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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
OUTER DIAMETER CLEANING AND SANDING DRILL ATTACHMENT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2020/086565
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An attachment for a drill comprises a shank with a chuck configured to mount the attachment to the drill. A housing on the shank comprises a threaded end and a hollow chamber. A compression bladder having a tubular opening through it is configured to be inserted into the hollow chamber. A tube comprising a sanding or cleaning surface located on the inner surface of the tube is configured to be insertable into the tubular opening of the compression bladder. A threaded lid having a circular opening that is at least the same diameter as the inner diameter of the tube is configured to mount onto the housing at the threaded end and compress the compression bladder thereby reducing the diameter of the tubular opening and compressing the compression bladder against the tube to secure the tube within the housing.

Inventors:
GROVE LAWRENCE (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US2019/057417
Publication Date:
April 30, 2020
Filing Date:
October 22, 2019
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
GROVE LAWRENCE W (US)
International Classes:
B24D7/02; B23B51/00; B24B3/00; B24B9/00; B24B21/00; B24D7/00; B24D7/06
Foreign References:
US3188674A1965-06-15
US5167527A1992-12-01
US5419087A1995-05-30
US8032970B22011-10-11
US5791005A1998-08-11
US8613642B22013-12-24
Other References:
"Dremel 432 ½-lnch 120 Grit Sanding Bands, 6 Pack", POWER & HAND TOOLS, 27 June 2017 (2017-06-27), Retrieved from the Internet [retrieved on 20191126]
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
D'SILVA, Jonathan, M. (US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

What is claimed is:

1. An attachment for a drill that comprises:

a shank with a chuck configured to mount the attachment to the drill;

a housing on the shank;

said housing comprising a threaded end and a hollow chamber;

a compression bladder having a tubular opening through said compression bladder; said compression bladder configured to be inserted into said hollow chamber;

a tube comprising a sanding or cleaning surface located on the inner surface of said tube;

said tube is configured to be insertable into said tubular opening of said compression bladder;

a threaded lid having a circular opening, said circular opening is at least the same diameter as the inner diameter of said tube, said lid is configured to mount onto said housing at said threaded end and compress said compression bladder thereby reducing the diameter of the tubular opening and compressing said compression bladder against said tube to secure said tube within said housing.

2. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising said compression bladder comprises a series of compression bladders that extend through said hollow chamber.

3. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising at least one non-compressible ring in line with said compression bladder.

4. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising said lid further comprises a

non-compressible ring mounted between said lid and said compression bladder.

5. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising said compression bladder is an elastomeric material.

6. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising said tube is made of paper, plastic, or metal.

7. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising said sanding or cleaning surface

comprises one of emery cloth, sandpaper, and glass paper.

8. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising said tube has an inner diameter in the range of ¼-inch to 5-inches.

9. The attachment of claim 1 further comprising said circular opening has a diameter of in the range of ¼-inch to 5-inches.

10. A tube comprising a sanding or cleaning surface located on the inner surface of the tube.

11. The tube of claim 10 in which said tube is made of paper, plastic, or metal.

12. The tube of claim 10 in which said sanding or cleaning surface comprises one of emery cloth, sandpaper, and glass paper.

13. The tube of claim 10 in which the tube has an inner diameter in the range of ¼-inch and 5-inches.

Description:
Outer Diameter Cleaning and Sanding Drill Attachment

Background

There is a need to sand the outer diameter of the end of pipes, fittings, and other tubes. This is done to ensure better insertion of parts or for the better adhesion of glue, or other such purpose. Sometimes the ends of pipe may just have to be cleaned. This is done primarily by hand as prior art mechanical means to sand or clean the outer diameter of a pipes are complicated and bulky. What is presented is an attachment that can be mounted to a standard drill for sanding and/or cleaning the outer diameter of pipes and other tubes. Summary

What is presented is an attachment for a drill that comprises a shank with a chuck configured to mount the attachment to the drill. A housing on the shank comprises a threaded end and a hollow chamber. A compression bladder having a tubular opening through it is configured to be inserted into the hollow chamber. A tube comprising a sanding or cleaning surface located on the inner surface of the tube is configured to be insertable into the tubular opening of the compression bladder. A threaded lid having a circular opening that is at least the same diameter as the inner diameter of the tube is configured to mount onto the housing at the threaded end and compress the compression bladder thereby reducing the diameter of the tubular opening and compressing the compression bladder against the tube to secure the tube within the housing.

The compression bladder is an elastomeric material but can be any compressible material. The tube is made of paper, plastic, or metal and the sanding or cleaning surface comprises one of emery cloth, sandpaper, glass paper, or other cleaning or abrasion system.

The tube has an inner diameter to match the range of pipe outer diameters that are to be sanded or cleaned but typically the tube would be in the range of ¼-inch to 5-inches for small handheld drills but could be made of larger sizes for commercial and industrial applications. The circular opening of the attachment limits the size of pipe that may be sanded or cleaned by the attachment, but it would typically have a diameter of in the range of ¼-inch to 5-inches for small handheld drills but could be made of larger sizes for commercial and industrial applications.

In some embodiments, the compression bladder could comprise a series of compression bladders that extend through the hollow chamber. In this instance one or more of the compression bladders could be replaced by a non-compressible ring. The lid could also be modified to have a non-compressible ring mounted between the lid and the compression bladder. This non-compressible ring could be formed into the lid, attached to the lid, or free floating between the lid and the compression bladder.

Those skilled in the art will realize that this invention is capable of embodiments that are different from those shown and that details of the apparatus and methods can be changed in various manners without departing from the scope of this invention.

Accordingly, the drawings and descriptions are to be regarded as including such equivalent embodiments as do not depart from the spirit and scope of this invention.

Brief Description of Drawings

For a more complete understanding and appreciation of this invention, and its many advantages, reference will be made to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an outer diameter cleaning and sanding drill attachment mounted to a drill indicating a pipe about to be inserted into the attachment for sanding or cleaning; FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the outer diameter cleaning and sanding drill attachment shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the outer diameter cleaning and sanding drill attachment shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 shows how a tube is formed from a sheet of sanding paper;

FIG. 4A shows a completely formed tube;

FIG. 5 is a view of a portion of another tube having a different wall thickness;

FIG. 6 is a view of a portion of another tube having a different wall thickness;

FIG. 7 is an exploded view of another embodiment of outer diameter cleaning and sanding drill attachment in which the compression bladder comprises a series of compression bladders; and

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of lid that has a non-compressible ring mounted to it.

Detailed Description

Referring to the drawings, some of the reference numerals are used to designate the same or corresponding parts through several of the embodiments and figures shown and described. Corresponding parts are denoted in different embodiments with the addition of lowercase letters. Variations of corresponding parts in form or function that are depicted in the figures are described. It will be understood that variations in the embodiments can generally be interchanged without deviating from the invention.

As best understood by comparing FIGs. 1 and 2, what is presented is an attachment 10 for a drill 12 that can be used to sand or clean the outer diameter of a pipe 14 that is inserted into the attachment 10. The attachment 10 comprises a shank 16 with a chuck 18 that is configured to mount the attachment 10 into a standard handheld drill 12. A housing 20 on the shank 16 comprises a threaded end 22 and a hollow chamber 24. A compression bladder 26 having a tubular opening 28 through it is configured to be inserted into the hollow chamber 24. A tube 30 comprising a sanding or cleaning surface located on the inner surface of the tube 30 is configured to be insertable into the tubular opening 28 of the compression bladder 26. A threaded lid 32 having a circular opening 34 that is at least the same diameter as the inner diameter of the tube 30 is configured to mount onto the housing 20 at the threaded end 22.

As best understood by comparing FIGs. 2 and 3, as the lid 32 is screwed onto the threaded end 22 of the housing 20, the lid 32 compresses the compression bladder 26 thereby reducing the diameter of the tubular opening 28 and compressing the compression bladder 26 against the tube 30 to secure the tube 30 within the housing 20. This allows the tube 30 to be firmly held in place when the drill 12 is operated and a pipe 14 is inserted into the attachment 10. This allows the sanding surface of the tube 30 to sand or clean the outer diameter of the inserted pipe 14.

The housing 20, the tubular opening 28, and the tube 30 are of a length that limits the length of the end of the inserted pipe 16 that is able to be sanded/cleaned as it is inserted into the attachment 10. The compression bladder 26 is made of any compressible material that when compressed will reduce the diameter of the tubular opening 28. It is preferred that the compression bladder 26 is an elastomeric material such as rubber or a polymer plastic or a foam material.

The tube 30 comprises a sanding or cleaning surface that may be one of emery cloth, sandpaper, glass paper, or any other kind of abrasive or cleaning material. The tube 30 is made of paper, plastic, or metal. As shown in FIGs 4A and 4B, the tube 30 may be made of a paper or paperboard material that is rolled and secured by glue or other method to form the complete tube 30. The tube 30 may instead be manufactured to be an extruded metal or plastic tube with the appropriate cleaning or abrasive surface added. The tube 30 is sized to accept the insertion of pipes 14 into the attachment 10. The limitations on the size of pipe 14 to be accepted into the attachment 10 is the size of the circular opening 34 of the lid 32. For practical purposes, the circular opening 34 could have a diameter in the range of ¼-inch to 5-inches. Larger diameters would be possible but would likely make the drill 12 and attachment 10 unwieldy to handle and operate for small handheld drills but could be made of larger sizes for commercial and industrial applications. Correspondingly, the tube 30 would also have to have an inner diameter to accommodate the outer diameter of the pipes 14 to be cleaned/sanded and for practical purposes, the tubes could be sized to have an inner diameter in the range of ¼-inch to 5-inches, for small handheld drills but could be made of larger sizes for commercial and industrial applications so long as the compression bladder 26 has a tubular opening 28 that can accommodate the tube 30.

As shown in FIGs. 5 and 6, it is also possible to manufacture tubes 30a, 30b that have varying thicknesses. As best understood by comparing FIGs. 2, 5, and 6, it can be understood that that a tubular opening 28 of one size can accommodate a variety of tubes 30, 30a, 30b with different inner diameters to accommodate pipes of varying outer diameter. In this way a single attachment could be used to sand or clean pipes of varying outer diameter by merely changing out the tube 30, 30a, 30b to one of the appropriate inner diameter.

Alternatively, a user would have to swap out compression bladders that have differently sized tubular openings 28 with a tube 30 of the appropriate size. The limiting factor in this scenario would be the size of the circular opening 34 of the lid 32. Otherwise, the used would have to use larger attachments 10 with larger housings 20 that are able to accommodate lids 32 with larger circular openings 34, compression bladders 26 with larger tubular openings 28 and tubes 30 with larger inner diameters.

FIG. 7 shows another embodiment of attachment 10c in which the attachment 10c comprises a shank 16c with a chuck 18c that is configured to mount the attachment 10c into a standard handheld drill. A housing 20c on the shank 16c comprises a threaded end 22c and a hollow chamber 24c. The compression bladder 26c in this embodiment is a series of compression bladders 26c that extend through said hollow chamber 24c. Each compression bladder 26c has a tubular opening 28c through it. The series of compression bladders 26c is configured to be inserted into the hollow chamber 24c and completely fills the attachment 10c. A tube 30c comprising a sanding or cleaning surface located on the inner surface of the tube 30c is configured to be insertable into the tubular openings 28c of the series of compression bladders 26c. A threaded lid 32c having a circular opening 34c that is at least the same diameter as the inner diameter of the tube 30c is configured to mount onto the housing 20c at the threaded end 22c.

The advantage to having a series of compression bladders 26c is that a user can use same compression bladders 26c in a variety of housings 20c of different length by the same diameter. So, if a longer length of tube needed to be sanded, an attachment 10c with a longer housing 20c could be used with the compression bladders 26c of different attachments.

In some embodiments, any one or more of the series of compression bladders 26c could be replaced with an incompressible ring in line with the compression bladders 26c. This could be done for costs reasons or to fill in empty space in a hollow chamber 24c for a housing 20c that maybe too long. FIG. 8 shows a cross section of an embodiment of lid 32d in which a non- compressible ring 36d is mounted to the lid 32d. The non-compressible ring 36d is located between the lid 32d and the compression bladder and assists in pushing the compression bladder into the housing of the attachment. The non-compressible ring 36d in this embodiment is formed into the lid 32d but it could be a separate piece that it free floating or attached to the lid with clips or other means. The non-compressible ring could also limit the size of the circular opening 34d if additional support were to be required to compress the compression bladder.

This invention has been described with reference to several preferred embodiments. Many modifications and alterations will occur to others upon reading and understanding the preceding specification. It is intended that the invention be construed as including all such alterations and modifications in so far as they come within the scope of the appended claims or the equivalents of these claims.