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Title:
QUICK ADJUSTMENT AND STRAP LOCKING SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/135209
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A quick adjustment and strap locking system for a head-mounted display device is provided. The system incorporates a one-touch actuation mechanism to adjust a position of a strap relative to a fixed portion of the head-mounted display device. This adjustment resizes the head opening defined by the strap to custom fit to the head shape and size of a user. Upon depressing an adjustment actuation button, a strap locking member in the system is pivoted from a strap-locked position to a strap-unlocked position. In the strap-unlocked position, the strap may be moved and adjusted, under spring force, to resize the head opening for the head-mounted display device. Releasing the adjustment actuation button pivotally returns the strap locking member into the strap-locked position and the strap is locked in place at the adjusted head opening size.

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Inventors:
AVNER SADOT AVNER (IL)
ORI JACOBI ORI (IL)
ROTEM PERETS ROTEM (IL)
RAZ ELIAS RAZ (IL)
XINYUE TANG XINYUE (CN)
ZHANG YUNQI ZHANG (CN)
HOU YUXI HOU (CN)
Application Number:
PCT/IL2018/050026
Publication Date:
July 11, 2019
Filing Date:
January 08, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
FLEX LTD (SG)
AVNER SADOT AVNER (IL)
International Classes:
A42B3/14; A42B1/22; A44B11/20; G02B27/01; H04N5/64
Foreign References:
US20060070168A12006-04-06
US20060053532A12006-03-16
US4292692A1981-10-06
US3992720A1976-11-23
US5276471A1994-01-04
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
VOLMAN, Gail (IL)
Download PDF:
Claims:
What Is Claimed Is:

1. A strap adjustment system for a head-mounted display device, comprising:

an elongate strap locking member extending a length from a first end to a second end, the strap locking member including a locking feature disposed along the length, the locking feature configured to selectively engage with a mating locking feature disposed on a strap;

a mechanism housing including at least one internal volume containing the strap locking member, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the mechanism housing at a pivot axis running the length of the strap locking member; and

a lock actuation member disposed at least partially within the mechanism housing, the lock actuation member translatable along an axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis between first and second positions, the lock actuation member pivotally connected to the strap locking member at a rotation axis offset from the pivot axis by a non-zero distance, the rotation axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis,

wherein in the first position the strap locking member is in a strap-locked position, and wherein in the second position the strap locking member is pivoted from the strap-locked position into a strap-unlocked position.

2. The strap adjustment system of claim 1, wherein the locking feature includes a plurality of apertures disposed in a linear array along the length of the strap locking member.

3. The strap adjustment system of claim 2, further comprising:

a strap having a first end disposed within a portion of the mechanism housing, wherein the strap includes a locking key feature disposed adjacent to the first end of the strap and protruding in a direction perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein the locking key feature engages with at least one aperture of the plurality of apertures when the strap locking member is in the strap-locked position, and wherein the strap locking member is pivoted in a direction away from the strap and the locking key feature in the strap-unlocked position and the locking key feature is disengaged from the at least one aperture.

4. The strap adjustment system of claim 3, further comprising:

a strap tension device attached to the mechanism housing at an attachment point, wherein the strap tension device is operatively interconnected to the strap adjacent to the first end of the strap, wherein the strap tension device applies a tension force to the strap pulling the first end of the strap toward the attachment point.

5. The strap adjustment system of claim 4, wherein the strap tension device further comprises:

a torsion spring having a first end and a second end disposed opposite the first end, wherein the torsion spring includes a coiled section of spring material disposed between the first and second ends of the torsion spring, wherein the first end of the torsion spring is fixed relative to the mechanical housing;

a retractable band having a first and second end, wherein the first end of the retractable band is connected to the second end of the torsion spring, and wherein the second end of the retractable band is connected to the first end of the strap.

6. The strap adjustment system of claim 5, wherein the lock actuation member includes an interface contact portion exposed from the mechanism housing, and wherein the lock actuation member is biased in the first position via a compression spring disposed between the lock actuation member and a fixed point associated with the mechanism housing.

7. The strap adjustment system of claim 6, wherein the lock actuation member includes a slot disposed in a thickness of the lock actuation member, the slot running along the axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein a pin is disposed in the slot along the rotation axis, and wherein the strap locking member is pivotally connected to the pin via a hole or slot disposed in a protrusion formed in a portion of the strap locking member.

8. The strap adjustment system of claim 7, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the mechanism housing via a pin disposed at the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member, the pin extending into a receiving portion of the mechanism housing adjacent to the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member.

9. The strap adjustment system of claim 8, wherein the locking key feature is substantially rectangular in shape, and wherein each of the plurality of apertures is substantially rectangular in shape and sized to receive the locking key feature.

10. The strap adjustment system of claim 9, wherein the strap is adjustable relative to the mechanism housing along an axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis.

11. A head-mounted display device, comprising:

a frame comprising a first temple portion disposed on a first side of the frame and a second temple portion disposed on an opposite second side of the frame;

a forehead contact pad operatively connected to the frame and disposed at least partially between the first and second temple portions;

at least one display device disposed between the first and second temple portions;

a strap having a first end disposed adjacent to the first temple portion and a second end disposed adjacent to the second temple portion forming a closed loop defining a head size perimeter; and

a strap adjustment system disposed within a housing portion of the first and/or second temple portion of the frame, the strap adjustment system comprising:

an elongate strap locking member extending a length from a first end to a second end, the strap locking member including a locking feature disposed along the length, the locking feature configured to selectively engage with a mating locking feature disposed on a strap, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the housing portion at a pivot axis running the length of the strap locking member; and

a lock actuation member disposed at least partially within the housing portion, the lock actuation member translatable along an axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis between first and second positions, the lock actuation member pivotally connected to the strap locking member at a rotation axis offset from the pivot axis by a non-zero distance, the rotation axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis, wherein in the first position the strap locking member is in a strap-locked position, and wherein in the second position the strap locking member is pivoted from the strap-locked position into a strap-unlocked position.

12. The head-mounted display device of claim 11 , wherein the strap includes at least one locking key feature disposed adjacent to the first and/or second end of the strap and protruding in a direction perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein the locking key feature engages with at least one aperture of the plurality of apertures when the strap locking member is in the strap-locked position, and wherein the strap locking member is pivoted in a direction away from the strap and the locking key feature in the strap-unlocked position and the locking key feature is disengaged from the at least one aperture.

13. The head-mounted display device of claim 12, further comprising:

a strap tension device attached to the mechanism housing at an attachment point, wherein the strap tension device is operatively interconnected to the strap adjacent to the first end of the strap, wherein the strap tension device applies a tension force to the strap pulling the first end of the strap toward the attachment point.

14. The head-mounted display device of claim 13, wherein the strap tension device further comprises:

a torsion spring having a first end and a second end disposed opposite the first end, wherein the torsion spring includes a coiled section of spring material disposed between the first and second ends of the torsion spring, wherein the first end of the torsion spring is fixed relative to the housing portion;

a retractable band having a first and second end, wherein the first end of the retractable band is connected to the second end of the torsion spring, and wherein the second end of the retractable band is connected to the first end of the strap.

15. The head-mounted display device of claim 14, wherein the lock actuation member includes an interface contact portion exposed from the housing portion, and wherein the lock actuation member is biased in the first position via a compression spring disposed between the lock actuation member and a fixed point associated with the housing portion or frame.

16. The head-mounted display device of claim 15, wherein the lock actuation member includes a slot disposed in a thickness of the lock actuation member, the slot running along the axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein a pin is disposed in the slot along the rotation axis, and wherein the strap locking member is pivotally connected to the pin via a hole or slot disposed in a protrusion formed in a portion of the strap locking member.

17. The head-mounted display device of claim 16, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the housing portion or frame via a pin disposed at the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member, the pin extending into a receiving portion of the housing portion or frame adjacent to the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member.

18. The head-mounted display device of claim 17, wherein the strap is adjustable relative to the mechanism housing along an axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis, wherein displacing the lock actuation member along the axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis causes the strap tension device to move the first end of the strap toward the first temple portion and/or the second end of the strap toward the second temple portion reducing the head size perimeter.

19. The head-mounted display device of claim 18, wherein the locking key feature is substantially rectangular in shape, and wherein each of the plurality of apertures is substantially rectangular in shape and sized to receive the locking key feature.

20. A method for donning an adjustable head-mounted display device, comprising: providing a head-mounted display device, comprising:

a frame comprising a first temple portion disposed on a first side of the frame and a second temple portion disposed on an opposite second side of the frame; a forehead contact pad operatively connected to the frame and disposed at least partially between the first and second temple portions;

at least one display device disposed between the first and second temple portions; a strap having a first end disposed adjacent to the first temple portion and a second end disposed adjacent to the second temple portion forming a closed loop defining a head size perimeter, the strap including an occipital contact point disposed at a center of the closed loop; and

a strap adjustment system disposed within a housing portion of the first and/or second temple portion of the frame, the strap adjustment system comprising:

an elongate strap locking member extending a length from a first end to a second end, the strap locking member including a locking feature disposed along the length, the locking feature configured to selectively engage with a mating locking feature disposed on a strap, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the housing portion at a pivot axis running the length of the strap locking member; and

a lock actuation member disposed at least partially within the housing portion, the lock actuation member translatable along an axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis between first and second positions, the lock actuation member pivotally connected to the strap locking member at a rotation axis offset from the pivot axis by a non-zero distance, the rotation axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis, wherein in the first position the strap locking member is in a strap-locked position, and wherein in the second position the strap locking member is pivoted from the strap-locked position into a strap -unlocked position;

translating the lock actuation member from the first position to the second position; positioning the occipital contact point of the strap adjacent to an occipital bone or protuberance of a user’s head;

pulling the frame of the head-mounted display device in a direction toward a frontal bone of the user’s head while maintaining the lock actuation member in the second position;

seating the forehead contact pad against the frontal bone of the user’s head while maintaining the lock actuation member in the second position; and translating the lock actuation member from the second position to the first position, locking the strap and head-mounted display device in place on the user’s head.

Description:
QUICK ADJUSTMENT AND STRAP LOCKING SYSTEM

FIELD

[0001] The present disclosure is generally directed to display devices and, in particular, toward head-mounted displays.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Head-mounted displays (HMDs) have become popular for virtual reality (VR) and/or augmented reality (AR) applications, for example, VR games. The HMDs generally include optics positioned in front of the eyes that can provide a user interface that is totally or nearly totally immersive. The HMDs generally include a device, which includes the optics, that is positioned in front of the eyes and held onto the head with a strap or other implement that mates the HMD to the user’s head. In many configurations, the HMD includes a strap that is placed around the user’s head and can be tightened to head to keep the HMD in position.

[0003] Unfortunately, existing HMDs have distinct disadvantages. First, the HMDs do not always securely mate with the user’s face and/or head. The looseness of the HMD causes the HMD to move around on the user’s face and, in some extreme circumstances, causes chaffing. Second, the HMDs can be weighty. Many of the current HMDs have the HMD rest on the bridge of the user’s nose. Having the weighty HMD resting on the nose for significant periods of time causes pain and irritation. Third, the HMDs do not always register to the same spot on the user’s head and thus may misalign the optics from a user’s field of vision. The misalignment causes an unpleasant experience with the HMD optics and operation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0004] Fig. 1 A is a perspective view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0005] Fig. 1B is another perspective view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0006] Fig. 2 A is a plan view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure; [0007] Fig. 2B is an elevation view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0008] Fig. 2C is another plan view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0009] Fig. 2D is another elevation view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0010] Fig. 2E is another elevation view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0011] Fig. 2F is another elevation view of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0012] Fig. 3A shows a perspective view of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head- mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0013] Fig. 3B shows a perspective view of a frame of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0014] Fig. 3C shows a perspective view of a contact pad of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0015] Fig. 3D is a plan view of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0016] Fig. 3E is an elevation view of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0017] Fig. 3F is another plan view of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0018] Fig. 3G is another elevation view of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head- mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0019] Fig. 3H is another elevation view of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head- mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0020] Fig. 31 is another elevation view of an ergonomic smart leaf component of a head- mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure; [0021] Fig. 4 A shows a top view of an exemplary head of a user in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0022] Fig. 4B shows a side view of an exemplary head of a user in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0023] Fig. 5 shows a hardware diagram for the HMD and/or other computer systems associated with or in communication with the HMD in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0024] Fig. 6 A shows a broken perspective view of a quick adjustment strap locking system in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0025] Fig. 6B shows a broken perspective view of a quick adjustment strap locking system in a first state in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0026] Fig. 6C shows a broken perspective view of a quick adjustment strap locking system in a second state in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0027] Fig. 7A shows schematic views of a quick adjustment strap locking system in a first state in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0028] Fig. 7B shows schematic views of a quick adjustment strap locking system in a second state in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0029] Fig. 7C shows schematic views of a quick adjustment strap locking system in a third state in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0030] Fig. 7D shows schematic views of a quick adjustment strap locking system in a fourth state in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure;

[0031] Fig. 8 A is a flow diagram of a method for donning a head-mounted display in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure; and

[0032] Fig. 8B is a graphical illustration of steps of the method described in conjunction with Fig. 8A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0033] It is with respect to the above issues and other problems that the embodiments presented herein were contemplated. In general, embodiments of the present disclosure provide methods, devices, and systems for donning a head-mounted display (HMD). To guarantee that the HMD can fit all or most users, the HMD includes a harness that has a special shape design referred to as a smart leaf. The location between the suborbital ridge, relative to the location of the eyes and other facial features, is little different between users. This location may be at or proximal to the glabella between the superciliary arches, which is a cephalometric landmark that is just superior to the nasion. This location between the suborbital ridges can function as a standard reference position for the HMD. A component of the harness, referred to as the smart leaf, is designed to contact the head of the user using the location between the suborbital ridge as a reference point to ensure proper location of the optics of the HMD over the eyes of the user.

[0034] However, the shape of each user’s forehead and head in general may be different. Thus, the smart leaf can have an extended flexible structure to compensate for the differences in shape of each user’s head. Further, the smart leaf can include a soft material, referred to as a contact pad, as part of the flexible structure, to absorb further differences and provide for the comfort of the users.

[0035] To ensure the best fit and comfort for the HMD, the harness can include a head strap that has an adjustable strap portion and the flexible smart leaf. The harness structure can have good weight balance. A least a part of the weight of the HMD can be supported by the forehead, where the smart leaf rests on the user’s head. The head strap can also be adjustable to further customize the fit of the HMD to the user. In use, the smart leaf can keep the device in the right position. When the strap is tightened, the position is maintained.

[0036] Further, the head strap can be adjustable. To ensure the HMD user can quickly put on and put off the HMD, and that the HMD can fit all or most of the users well, the head band or head strap can have a certain distance adjustment to allow the HMD to fit around the heads of the different users. The harness can include control buttons to control a rack that may be engaged or disengaged, with the head strap, at one side or both sides of the HMD.

[0037] To don the HMD, a user can put the head strap around the back side of the head (placing a back of the strap over or in proximity to the external occipital protuberance of the skull as a reference point), and then press the both control buttons together; the rack will be disengaged. Then, the user can pull the front part of the HMD, by hand, to position the smart leaf onto or near the glabella. A torsional spring, or strap tension device, in the HMD and coupled to the head strap can be pulled out a certain distance when moving the HMD over the forehead. With the user holding the pull force of the torsional spring, the user can adjust the amount of strap provided and then can release the control button. The rack will then be engaged, and the position of the HMD is then fixed to allow the user to use the HMD with a proper alignment of the optics.

[0038] Head-Mounted Display:

[0039] Figs. 1 A through 2F show views of a HMD 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. The configuration of the HMD 100 shown in Figs. 1 A-2F is not limiting and may be modified as appropriate to accomplish providing an image to a user through optics provided with the HMD 100. Herein, the HMD 100 will be described with reference to the coordinate system 101, where the“X” direction is across the HMD 100, where the“Y” direction is from bottom to top of the HMD 100, and where the“Z” direction is from front to back of the HMD 100.

[0040] The HMD 100 can include a housing 102. The housing 102 can include a back portion 106, a front portion 114, a top portion 110, and a bottom portion 118. The various components described herein and associated with the HMD 100 can be coupled to the HMD 100 at one or more of the back portion 106, the front portion 114, the top portion 110, and/or the bottom portion 118 of the housing 102. Throughout this description, the terms“coupling” or“couple” can refer to any type of mechanical attachment, adherence by a glue or other component, forming two components together, movably joined, etc.

[0041] The housing 102 may be made from a rigid material, for example, plastic, metal, etc. The housing 102 has enough rigidity to secure the components attached thereto without racking, sagging, deforming, etc. The housing 102 can have a temple housing 124A, 124B (also referred to as a temple) configured at each side of the housing 102. The temple housing 124 can include the adjustment mechanism to adjust the fit of the HMD 100, as explained hereinafter.

[0042] At the back portion 106 of housing 102, a smart leaf 104 may be coupled to the housing 102. The smart leaf 104 may be as described in conjunction with Figs. 3A-3C. The smart leaf 104 can be coupled to the housing 102 at a predetermined position. The predetermined position of the smart leaf 104 ensures that, when a bottom portion the smart leaf 104 is registered to a reference point on a user’s forehead (for example, the glabella 412 of the user 400, as shown in Figs. 4A and 4B), the optics 112 of the HMD 100 are be positioned in an orientation that allows the optics 112 to provide an image to at least one eye of the user. Further, the predetermined position of the smart leaf 104 ensures this correct alignment regardless of the shape of the user’s forehead 420 because the reference point 412 generally has a common position relative to the user’s other features, especially the eyes.

[0043] The optics 112 can be coupled to the housing 102 at a bottom portion 118 of the housing 102. The optics can include a surface, whether clear plastic, glass, or other material, that can provide an image through integrated electronics, by a projection from a light emitting source, or by other configurations. Importantly, the optics 112 have a predetermined position relative to the smart leaf 104 and relative to the eyes of the user. There may be an optic 112 A, 112B for each eye. These separate optics 112A, 112B can provide the same image for binocular vision (can provide three dimensional images) or different images. An image can be any user interface, picture, video, etc.

[0044] An optional nose piece 108 may allow the HMD 100 to be further oriented in proximity to or at the nasion or nose of the user. Some or none of the weight of the HMD 100 may be borne by the nose piece 108 resting on the bridge of the nose. The nose piece 108 can be made from various rigid or semirigid materials, such as plastics, rubber, etc. The nose piece 108 can further align the optics 112 with the eyes.

[0045] An optional visor 116 may be coupled to the front portion 114 of the housing 102 to protect the optics 112 and face of the user. The visor 116 can be made from any rigid, transparent material, for example, glass, clear plastics, etc. In some configurations, the visor 116 may not be transparent.

[0046] The housing 102 can also be coupled to a rear strap 132 (also referred to simply as the strap) that goes around the head of the user. The strap 132 can be any material, for example, a fabric, webbing, etc., that can comfortably secure the HMD 100 to the user’s head and wrap around the head to maintain the position of the HMD 100 on the user.

[0047] The strap 132 can include a support unit 136 arranged at the rear of the strap 132 that can register to the occipital protuberance at the back of a user’s head. The support unit 136 can be shaped to comfortably fit over the back of the user’s head, and thus, may be curvilinear or arcuate to conform to the curvature of the rear of a user’s head. The support unit 136 can be made from a rigid or semirigid material, for example, metals, plastics, etc., and may have a pad or soft material that contacts the user’s head formed interior of the support unit 136. [0048] The support unit 136 may also have coupled thereto a counterweight or weight 140 that counterbalances the weight of the housing 102 and the components connected thereto. The weight 140 can be made from various heavier materials, such as metals, and may be shaped to conform to the shape of the support unit 136.

[0049] The strap 132 may be adjustable using a mechanism 600 contained within or mounted to a temple housing 124. The mechanism 600 may be as described hereinafter in conjunction with Figs. 6A-8B. To engage the mechanism 600, one or more harness lock/unlock control buttons 120A, 120B, or lock actuation member 604, may be engaged or disengaged by the user. The positioning and operation of the harness lock/unlock control buttons 120A, 120B, or lock actuation member 604, can be as described hereinafter.

[0050] The housing unit 102 can contain, house, or comprise various electrical or electronic componentry that allows the HMD 100 to provide an image to a user on the optics 112. This componentry can be as described hereinafter in conjunction with Fig. 5. To allow for user input into these components, the housing 102 can also include a brightness adjustment button 144 to control the brightness of the optics 112, a volume button 148 to control the volume of speakers associated with the HMD 100, and/or a power button 152 to turn the power on or off to the HMD 100. Other various buttons or interfaces are possibly included with the housing 102.

[0051] Smart Leaf:

[0052] Figs. 3 A through 31 show views of a smart leaf 104 in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. The smart leaf 104 may be formed from two components, a frame 304 and a contact pad 308. The frame 304 and contact pad 308 can be coupled together. The smart leaf 104 can correctly position the HMD 100 on the head of the user and allow the head of the user to hold all or at least a majority of the weight of the HMD 100.

[0053] A connection interface 312 can couple the smart leaf 104 to the housing 102 of the HMD 100. Further, the connection interface 312 is formed opposite a bottom portion 314 on the contact pad 308 that can be registered to a reference point 412 (for example, the glabella) of a user’s forehead 420. The bottom portion 314 and position relative to the connection interface 312 ensures that when the HMD 100 is donned and positioned on a user’s head 420, the optics 112 will be positioned correctly in front of the user’s eyes. Thus, the frame 304 can be positioned over, on, or within proximity to the glabella 412 of the user to register the HMD 100 to the head 420 of the user, in other words, the bottom portion 314, which registers to the reference point 412 on or near the glabella on the forehead 420 of the user, places the optics at a predetermined position in front of the eye of the user, regardless of the shape of the head 420 of the user.

[0054] The frame 304 can have a first arcuate shape 396 in a first plane (the XZ-plane).

Further, the frame 304 can have a second arcuate shape 398 in a second plane (the YZ-plane). Thus, the two arcuate shapes 396, 398 form a“bowl-like” shape that fits over at least partially the forehead 420 and at least partially the top 422 of the head of the user. The two arcuate shapes 396, 398 allow at least some of the weight of the HMD 100 to be carried by and/or transferred to the head of the user, that is, the first arcuate shape 396 and the second arcuate shape 398 allow the smart leaf 104 to be placed on a forehead 420 of the user and allow the HMD 100 to be held by the smart leaf 104.

[0055] The frame 304 can be made from various materials that are flexible or semi-rigid. Thus, the frame 304 can be made from a metal, a plastic, a composite, and/or a combination of two or more of a metal, a plastic, and/or a composite. As such, the curvilinear form of the first arcuate shape 396 can change to fit the curve 404 of a user’s forehead 420. Thus, the radius of the arcuate shape 396 lengthens when placed on the user’s head to produce a lesser curve in the frame 304. The arcuate shape 396 is adjusted, due to the flexibility or compliant-nature of the frame material, to more closely match the curve 404 of the user’s forehead.

[0056] Likewise, the curvilinear form of the second arcuate shape 398 can change to fit the curve 408 of a user’s forehead 420 in the YZ-plane. Thus, the radius of the arcuate shape 398 lengthens when placed on the user’s head to produce a lesser curve in the frame 304 in the YZ- plane. The arcuate shape 398 is adjusted, due to the flexibility or compliant-nature of the frame material, to more closely match the curve 408 of the user’s forehead. The frame 304 flexes to conform to a shape of the forehead 420 of the user in two planes, e.g., the XZ-plane and the YZ- plane. This adjustment allows the smart leaf 104 to be used on several different users without needing to custom-fit each smart leaf 104 or HMD 100. Using the reference point 412, which is similarly positioned in all or most users relative to a user’s eyes, to mount the smart leaf 104, the smart leaf 104 can be used on several different users without needing to custom-fit each smart leaf 104 or modifying the placement of the optics 112 on the HMD 100. [0057] A particular configuration of the frame 304 is shown in Figs. 3A-3I, but the frame 304 is not limited to this configuration. The frame 304 and the frame’s constituent components may be of varied in thickness based on the material used. For example, the thickness of the frame 304 (generally in the Z-axis direction) can be from 1 to 100 millimeters. The frame 304 can include a substrate 316 formed at a bottom of the frame 304. The substrate 316 can have a top portion 364, a bottom portion 360, a first side 368, and a second side 370, a front 352 and a back 356. A mounting area 336 formed on or into the front 352 of the substrate 316 can receive or couple the substrate 316 to the connection interface 312. With the connection interface 312, the substrate 316 can be coupled to the housing 102 of the HMD 100. The substrate 316 can have the first arcuate shape 396. The substrate 316 can also have form at least a portion of the second arcuate shape 398. The substrate 316 can be of varying heights (in the Y-axis direction) depending on the material used. For example, the substrate 316 can be from 1 to 300 millimeters wide. Further, the substrate 316 can have varying lengths (in the X-axis direction), for example, longer than 10 centimeters and shorter than 30 centimeters.

[0058] In at least some configurations, two or more ribs 320A, 320B, 320C, 320D, 320E, and/or 320F may extend from a top portion 364 of the substrate 316 to or toward a distal top portion 326 of the frame 304. There can be more or fewer ribs 320 than those shown in Figs. 3A, 3B, and 3D-3I. The ribs 320 can have the second arcuate shape 398, but may also form at least a portion of the first arcuate shape 396. The ribs 320 can be formed with a rectangular or square- like cross sections. Thus, each rib 320 can have a front 344, a back 348, and two sides 340A, 340B. Further, the ribs 320 can be tapered from a front 340 of the rib 320 to a back 348 of the rib 320. The tapering further reduces weight but maintains the strength of the rib 320. The ribs 320 can be of varying widths (in the X-axis direction) depending on the material used. For example, each rib 320 can be from 1 to 100 millimeters wide. Further, the ribs 320 can have varying lengths (in the Y-axis direction), for example, longer than 2 centimeters and shorter than 10 centimeters.

[0059] Voids 328A, 328B may be formed between the ribs 320. Further, a connector 324A, 324B, and/or 324C can connect the distal portion of two or more of the ribs 320. These connectors 324 can also form voids 332A, 332B, and/or 332C between the ribs 320, connectors 324, and substrate 316. [0060] The frame 304 may be formed with the ribs 320 to reduce the weight of the frame 304 without compromising or only slightly lessening the strength of the frame 304. The connectors 324 provide further strength and rigidity (in the XY-plane) for the ribs 320. In some

configurations, the substrate 316 may project past the ribs 320 A, 320F to form flanges 368.

[0061] At the rear 356 of the frame 304, the frame 304 can be coupled to a contact pad 308. The contact pad 308 contacts the forehead 420 of the user and cushions the frame 304 from the user’s head. The contact pad 308 can be made of a soft material, or, at least, a material softer than that of the frame 304. Thus, the contact pad 308 may be made from a foam ( e.g ., a polyurethane foam), an inflated product, a paper product, a loose- fill product, a fiberboard product, etc. In some configurations, the contact pad 308 can have a uniform thickness (in the Z- axis direction), for example, between 1 and 100 millimeters.

[0062] When coupled to the frame 304, the contact pad 308 can assume or also have the first arcuate shape 396 in the first plane (the XZ-plane) and the second arcuate shape 398 in the second plane (the XY-plane). In other configurations, the contact pad 308 is formed with the first arcuate shape 396 in the first plane (the XZ-plane) and the second arcuate shape 398 in the second plane (the XY-plane). Like the frame 304, the first arcuate shape 396 and the second arcuate shape 398 allow the contact pad 308 to be placed and held on a forehead 420 of the user and to compensate for variations (e.g., skull bone differences, skin differences, muscle or fat differences, etc.) in the forehead 420 of the user.

[0063] The contact pad 308 can have a front 372 coupled to the frame 304, a back 376 that, when the HMD 100 is donned, is in contact with the user’s forehead 420, a first side 380A, a second side 380B, a top 388, and a bottom 384. In some configurations, the contact pad 308 is larger, in the XY-plane, than the frame 304. Thus, the extents of the contact pad 308 from the top 388 to the bottom 384 and between the sides 380 is a greater surface area than the frame 304.

The contact pad 308 can be coupled to the frame 304 either totally or partially on a front surface 372. The coupling may be mechanical, may be by adherence using a glue or other substance, or may be by another attachment means or mechanism.

[0064] The contact pad 308 can also include a registration shape 392, which can be a protrusion or indentation the registration shape 392 may be formed at a bottom portion 384 of the contact pad 308. This registration shape 392 may be registered to the reference point 412 on the user’s forehead 420. In this way, the user can feel when the contact pad 308 is placed in the proper position on the forehead 420 (as the user will be unable to see if the position is correct without a mirror).

[0065] Fig. 5 illustrates one embodiment of a computer system 500 upon which the HMD 100, or other systems or components described above, may be deployed or executed. The computer system 500 is shown comprising hardware elements that may be electrically coupled via a bus(ses) 504. Some hardware elements, represented by dashed boxes, may be optional or specific to one of the devices, e.g., the HMD 100. The hardware elements may include one or more central processing units (CPUs) 508; one or more input devices 512 (e.g., a mouse, a keyboard, etc.); and one or more output devices 516 (e.g., a display device, a printer, etc.). The computer system 500 may also include one or more storage devices 520. By way of example, storage device(s) 520 may be disk drives, optical storage devices, solid-state storage devices such as a random access memory (“RAM”) and/or a read-only memory (“ROM”), which can be programmable, flash-updateable and/or the like.

[0066] The computer system 500 may additionally include a computer-readable storage media reader 524; a communications system 528 (e.g., a modem, a network card (wireless or wired), an infra-red communication device, etc.); and working memory 536, which may include RAM and ROM devices as described above. The computer system 500 may also include a processing acceleration unit 532, which can include a DSP, a special-purpose processor, and/or the like.

[0067] The computer-readable storage media reader 524 can further be connected to a computer-readable storage medium, together (and, optionally, in combination with storage device(s) 520) comprehensively representing remote, local, fixed, and/or removable storage devices plus storage media for temporarily and/or more permanently containing computer- readable information. The communications system 528 may permit data to be exchanged with a network and/or any other computer described above with respect to the computer environments described herein. Moreover, as disclosed herein, the term“storage medium” may represent one or more devices for storing data, including read only memory (ROM), random access memory (RAM), magnetic RAM, core memory, magnetic disk storage mediums, optical storage mediums, flash memory devices and/or other machine readable mediums for storing information. [0068] The computer system 500 may also comprise software elements, shown as being currently located within a working memory 536, including an operating system 540 and/or other code 544. It should be appreciated that alternate embodiments of a computer system 500 may have numerous variations from that described above. For example, customized hardware might also be used and/or particular elements might be implemented in hardware, software (including portable software, such as applets), or both. Further, connection to other computing devices such as network input/output devices may be employed.

[0069] Examples of the processors 508 as described herein may include, but are not limited to, at least one of Qualcomm® Snapdragon® 800 and 801, Qualcomm® Snapdragon® 620 and 615 with 4G LTE Integration and 64-bit computing, Apple® A7 processor with 64-bit architecture, Apple® M7 motion coprocessors, Samsung® Exynos® series, the Intel® Core™ family of processors, the Intel® Xeon® family of processors, the Intel® Atom™ family of processors, the Intel Itanium® family of processors, Intel® Core® i5-4670K and i7-4770K 22nm Haswell, Intel® Core® i5-3570K 22nm Ivy Bridge, the AMD® FX™ family of processors, AMD® FX- 4300, FX-6300, and FX-8350 32nm Vishera, AMD® Kaveri processors, Texas Instruments® Jacinto C6000™ automotive infotainment processors, Texas Instruments® OMAP™

automotive-grade mobile processors, ARM® Cortex™-M processors, ARM® Cortex-A and ARM926EJ-S™ processors, other industry-equivalent processors, and may perform

computational functions using any known or future-developed standard, instruction set, libraries, and/or architecture.

[0070] The communications subsystem 528 can be connected to one or more different communication media ( e.g ., a cellular communication system, a BlueTooth® or BlueTooth® Low Energy (BLE) communication system, a WiFi® communication system, etc.), a positioning system (e.g., a global positioning satellite (GPS) system), one or more antenna, a battery, and/or a charging port. These associated components may be electrically and/or communicatively coupled to one another via at least one bus 504 to distribute power and/or communication signals.

[0071] In accordance with at least some embodiments of the present disclosure, the communication system 528 may utilize or communication using any type of known

communication medium or collection of communication media and may use any type of protocols, such as SIP, TCP/IP, SNA, IPX, AppleTalk, and the like, to transport messages between endpoints. The communication system 528 may use wired and/or wireless

communication technologies to communicate over communication network. The Internet is an example of the communication network that constitutes an Internet Protocol (IP) network consisting of many computers, computing networks, and other communication devices located all over the world, which are connected through many telephone systems and other means. Other examples of the communication network include, without limitation, a standard Plain Old Telephone System (POTS), an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), a Local Area Network (LAN), such as an Ethernet network, a Token-Ring network and/or the like, a Wide Area Network (WAN), a virtual network, including without limitation a virtual private network (“VPN”); the Internet, an intranet, an extranet, a cellular network, an infra-red network; a wireless network (e.g., a network operating under any of the IEEE 802.11 suite of protocols, the Bluetooth® protocol known in the art, and/or any other wireless protocol), and any other type of packet-switched or circuit-switched network known in the art and/or any combination of these and/or other networks. In addition, it can be appreciated that the communication network need not be limited to any one network type, and instead may be comprised of a number of different networks and/or network types. The communication network may comprise a number of different communication media such as coaxial cable, copper cable/wire, fiber-optic cable, antennas for transmitting/receiving wireless messages, and combinations thereof.

[0072] The communication system 528 can utilize one or more communication subsystems to communicate over the communication network. For example, the cellular system can be used to communicate through an antenna to a cellular system. The BLE system can be used to communicate to over a Bluetooth® connection, and the WiFi® system can be used to communicate over the WiFi® communication system 116.

[0073] The communications componentry can include one or more wired or wireless devices such as a transceiver(s) and/or modem that allows communications not only between the various systems disclosed herein but also with other devices, such as devices on a network, and/or on a distributed network such as the Internet and/or in the cloud. The communications subsystem 528 can also include inter- and intra- communications capabilities such as hotspot and/or access point connectivity.

[0074] Additionally, and while not specifically illustrated, the communications subsystem can include one or more communications links (that can be wired or wireless) and/or

communications busses 504, including one or more of CANbus, OBD-II, ARCINC 429, Byteflight, CAN (Controller Area Network), D2B (Domestic Digital Bus), FlexRay, DC-BUS, IDB-1394, IEBus, I2C, ISO 9141-1/-2, J1708, J1587, J1850, J1939, ISO 11783, Keyword Protocol 2000, LIN (Local Interconnect Network), MOST (Media Oriended Systems Transport), Multifunction Vehicle Bus, SMART wireX, SPI, VAN (Vehicle Area Network), and the like or in general any communications protocol and/or standard. The various protocols and

communications can be communicated one or more of wirelessly and/or over transmission media (sometimes when physically connected to a port in the HMD 100) such as single wire, twisted pair, fibre optic, IEEE 1394, MIL-STD-1553, MIL-STD-1773, power-line communication, or the like. (All of the above standards and protocols are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety)

[0075] As discussed, the communications subsystem 528 enables communications between any if the inter- systems and subsystems as well as communications with non-collocated resources, such as those reachable over a network such as the Internet. The communications subsystem 528, in addition to well-known componentry (which has been omitted for clarity), can include interconnected elements including one or more of, but not limited to: one or more antennas, an interleaver/deinterleaver, an analog front end (AFE), memory/storage/cache, MAC circuitry, modulator/demodulator, encoder/decoder, a plurality of connectivity managers, GPU/ accelerator, a multiplexer/demultiplexer, transmitter , receiver and wireless radio components such as a Wi-Fi PHY/Bluetooth® module, a Wi-Fi/BT MAC module, transmitter and receiver. The various elements in the computer system 500 are connected by one or more links/busses 504 (not shown, again for sake of clarity).

[0076] The computer system 500 can have one more antennas, for use in wireless

communications such as multi-input multi-output (MDVIO) communications, multi-user multi input multi-output (MU-MIMO) communications Bluetooth®, LTE, 4G, 5G, Near-Field Communication (NFC), etc. The antenna(s) can include, but are not limited to one or more of directional antennas, omnidirectional antennas, monopoles, patch antennas, loop antennas, microstrip antennas, dipoles, and any other antenna(s) suitable for communication

transmission/reception. In an exemplary embodiment, transmission/reception using MIMO may require particular antenna spacing. In another exemplary embodiment, MIMO

transmission/reception can enable spatial diversity allowing for different channel characteristics at each of the antennas.

[0077] The controller/microprocessor 508 may comprise a general purpose programmable processor or controller for executing application programming or instructions related to the computer system 500. Furthermore, the controller/microprocessor 508 can perform operations for configuring and transmitting/receiving information as described herein. The

controller/microprocessor 508 may include multiple processor cores, and/or implement multiple virtual processors. Optionally, the controller/microprocessor 508 may include multiple physical processors. By way of example, the controller/microprocessor 508 may comprise a specially configured Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) or other integrated circuit, a digital signal processor(s), a controller, a hardwired electronic or logic circuit, a programmable logic device or gate array, a special purpose computer, or the like.

[0078] The computer system 500 can further include a transmitter and receiver which can transmit and receive signals, respectively, to and from other devices, subsystems and/or other destinations using the one or more antennas and/or links/busses. Included in the communication system 528 circuitry is the medium access control or MAC Circuitry. MAC circuitry provides for controlling access to the wireless medium. In an exemplary embodiment, the MAC circuitry may be arranged to contend for the wireless medium and configure frames or packets for communicating over the wireless medium.

[0079] The computer system 500 can also optionally contain a security module (not shown). This security module can contain information regarding but not limited to, security parameters required to connect the device to one or more other devices or other available network(s), and can include WEP or WPA/WPA-2 (optionally + AES and/or TKIP) security access keys, network keys, etc. The WEP security access key is a security password used by Wi-Fi networks. Knowledge of this code can enable a wireless device to exchange information with an access point and/or another device. The information exchange can occur through encoded messages with the WEP access code often being chosen by the network administrator. WPA is an added security standard that is also used in conjunction with network connectivity with stronger encryption than WEP. The computer system 500 also includes a Wi-Fi/BT/BLE PHY module and a Wi-Fi/BT/BLE MAC module and wireless transmitter and receiver.

[0080] The HMD 100 may include a wireless network sensor. This sensor may be configured to detect one or more wireless network(s) around the HMD 100. Examples of wireless networks may include, but are not limited to, wireless communications utilizing Bluetooth®, Wi-Fi™, ZigBee, IEEE 802.11, and other wireless technology standards. For example, a mobile hotspot may be detected around the HMD 100 via the wireless network sensor. In this case, the HMD 100 may determine to utilize the mobile hotspot detected via/with one or more other devices and/or components associated with the HMD 100.

[0081] Quick Adjustment Strap Locking System:

[0082] Referring to Figs. 6A-C, various broken perspective views of a quick adjustment strap locking system 600 are shown in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. In some embodiments, the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 may be part of the HMD 100 and/or the temple housing 124 of the HMD 100. In any event, the broken perspective views may be taken through a section of the temple 124 and/or the strap 132. Although shown as including a section of the temple 124 and/or the strap 132, it should be appreciated that the strap 132 may extend from a first temple 124A to a second temple 124B. In combination with the housing 102 and/or frame of the HMD 100, the strap 132 may form or complete a closed head-strap loop that defines a head size perimeter and/or diameter for a user.

[0083] The quick adjustment strap locking system 600 may comprise a lock actuation member 604 that is pivotally connected to an elongate strap locking member 608. The lock actuation member may correspond to the harness lock/unlock control buttons 120A, 120B as described above. In some embodiments, the elongate strap locking member 608 may include a number of locking features 704 disposed along a length of the strap locking member 608. The locking features 704 may be configured as a plurality of receptacles that are configured to engage with and selectively lock onto a locking key feature 610 associated with the strap 132. In one embodiment, the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 may provide a strap-locked state and a strap-unlocked state that is based on a position of the lock actuation member 604 and the strap locking member 608.

[0084] Adjusting the strap position and/or the head size perimeter and/or diameter provided by the HMD 100 may include translating the lock actuation member 604 along a Y-axis direction 616 (see, e.g., coordinate system 602), or axis, from a first position to a second displaced position. The translation may be provided by a user pressing a contact surface of the lock actuation member 604 into or toward a portion of the housing 102. As the lock actuation member 604 is displaced along the Y-axis direction 616 toward the portion of the housing 102, the lock actuation member 604 may be linearly guided via one or more pins/protrusions 620 moving within at least one guide slot 624. The lock actuation member 604 may be biased in the first position via at least one spring element 626 (e.g., compression spring, etc.). Moving the lock actuation member 604 against the force provided by the at least one spring element 626 may cause the at least one spring element 626 to compress keeping a reaction force applied against the lock actuation member 604 even when in the second position. As can be appreciated, releasing an applied pressure from the contact surface of the lock actuation member 604 may cause the at least one spring element 626 to force and/or return the lock actuation member 604 to the first position.

[0085] The strap locking member 608 may be hingedly, or pivotally, coupled with the housing 102 and/or temple portion 132 via one or more pins 632 disposed on a pivot axis 636. The strap locking member 608 may rotate about the pivot axis 636 from a strap-locked position to a strap- unlocked position. For instance, the strap locking member 608 may be in the strap-locked position when the strap locking member 608 is disposed in the YZ-plane and be in a strap- unlocked position when the strap locking member 608 is rotated out of the YZ-plane about the pivot axis 636. In addition to being pivotally coupled with the housing 102 and/or temple portion 132, the strap locking member 608 may be pivotally connected to the lock actuation member 604 at a rotation axis 628. This rotation axis 628 may be offset (e.g., a non-zero distance) from, and parallel to, the pivot axis 636. In one embodiment, the rotation axis 628 may be associated with a pin disposed at least partially in the lock actuation member 604. As the lock actuation member 604 translates from the first position to the second position, the Y-axis translation of the lock actuation member 604 moves the position of the pin and, in turn, rotates the strap locking member 608 away from the strap 132 about the pivot axis 636 in an unlock rotation direction 640.

[0086] In some embodiments, the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 may include a strap tension device 612 configured to apply tension to the strap 132. The strap tension device 612 may be a retractable reel mechanism comprising a torsion spring and a retractable band. For instance, the torsion spring may include a first end and a second end disposed opposite the first end with a coiled section of spring material disposed therebetween. One end of the torsion spring (e.g., the first end, etc.) may be fixed relative to the housing 102 and the second end may be attached to a first end of the retractable band while the second end of the retractable band may be attached to the strap 132, providing the tension force. The strap 132 may be allowed to move within the housing 102 and/or temple portion 124 along the Z-axis and may be confined and/or limited in the X-axis and Y-axis via one or more channel features associated with the housing 102 and/or temple portion 124. It is an aspect of the present disclosure that the movement in the positive Z-axis direction would be resisted by the tension force provided by the strap tension device 612 (e.g., providing a pulling force in the negative Z-axis direction).

[0087] In some embodiments, the components making up the quick adjustment strap locking system 600, the smart leaf 104, and/or the HMD 100 may be made from plastic (e.g., polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyamide, polystyrene, polycarbonate, acrylic, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, etc.), metal (e.g., iron, steel, aluminum, titanium, brass, copper, etc., and/or alloys thereof), rubber (e.g., nitrile rubber, butyl rubber, ethylene propylene diene, fluorocarbon rubber, silicone rubber, polyurethane, chloroprene/neoprene, natural rubber, etc.), carbon fiber, composites, etc., and/or combinations thereof. In one embodiment, portions of the strap tension device 612 and/or the spring element 626 may be made from a spring material such as any class of spring steel, titanium, alloy steel, nickel titanium (e.g., Nitinol, etc.), stainless steel, copper alloys, etc., and/or combinations thereof.

[0088] In Fig. 6B, the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 is shown in a strap-locked state. For instance, the strap locking member 608 is disposed in the YZ-plane such that at least one locking key feature 610 of the strap 132 is engaged with a locking feature 704 of the strap locking member 608. In one embodiment, the locking key feature 610 may correspond to a substantially rectangular shaped protrusion that engages with a substantially rectangular shaped receptacle (e.g., the locking feature 704) of the strap locking member 608. In the strap-locked state, the strap 132 may be locked and restricted from moving along the Z-axis. Additionally or alternatively, in the strap-locked state, the strap 132 may be locked and/or restricted from moving along the X-axis and/or the Y-axis.

[0089] In Fig. 6C, the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 is shown in a strap-unlocked state. As an unlock force is applied to a contact surface of the lock actuation member 604 (e.g., in the negative Y-axis direction 616), the translation of the lock actuation member 604 moves the strap locking member 608 out of a locked position. For instance, the strap locking member 608 is rotated out of the YZ-plane (e.g., in an unlock rotation direction 640 away from the strap 132) such that at least one locking key feature 610 of the strap 132 is disengaged from a locking feature 704 of the strap locking member 608. In one embodiment, the substantially rectangular shaped protrusion may be completely disengaged from the substantially rectangular shaped receptacle of the strap locking member 608 in the strap-unlocked state. In the strap-unlocked state, the strap 132 may be allowed to move along the Z-axis, with a tension, or pulling, force provided by the strap tension device 612. To increase the closed head-strap loop that defines the head size perimeter and/or diameter for a user, the strap 132 may be pulled in the positive Z-axis direction while the lock actuation member 604 is maintained in the second position (e.g., held down or depressed). Additionally or alternatively, to decrease the closed head-strap loop that defines the head size perimeter and/or diameter for the user, the strap 132 may be allowed to move in the negative Z-axis direction (e.g., under the pulling force provided by the strap tension device 612, etc.). In any event, while the strap-unlocked state, the strap 132 may still be locked and/or restricted from moving along the X-axis and/or the Y-axis. Once the desired head size perimeter and/or diameter for the user has been set, the lock actuation member 604 may be released (e.g., allowing the spring element 626 to return to an original uncompressed size) and moved back to the first position locking the strap locking member 608 into a locked engagement with the strap 132.

[0090] Figs. 7A-D show various two-dimensional schematic views 700A-D of the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 transitioning between locked and unlocked states in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. In particular, each schematic view 700A-D includes a simplified front elevation view of the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 in conjunction with a detail end elevation view showing the position of the locking elements (e.g., locking key feature 610 of the strap, locking feature 704 of the strap locking member 608, etc.) while in each state.

[0091] Fig. 7A shows a schematic view of the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 in a first, strap-locked, state 700A. As shown in Fig. 7A, the strap locking member 608 is disposed in the YZ-plane such that a locking key feature 610 of the strap 132 is engaged with a locking feature 704 of the strap locking member 608. The strap locking member 608 is shown including a plurality of locking features 704 disposed in a spaced apart linear array running along a length of the strap locking member 608. In Figs. 7A-D, the plurality of locking features 704 are shown as substantially rectangular slots, receptacles, or cuts. In some embodiments, these locking features 704 may extend a depth into a thickness of the strap locking member 608 and/or pass completely through the thickness of the strap locking member 608. The strap 132 is shown in a forwardmost position (e.g., closest to the visor 116 of the HMD 100, providing a minimum head size perimeter dimension adjustment) with the locking key feature 610 of the strap 132 engaged with a first locking feature 704 in the linear array of locking features 704.

[0092] Referring now to Fig. 7B, the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 is shown in a second, strap-unlocked, state 700B. In one embodiment, the strap locking member 608 may be moved from the engaged/locked position, as shown in Fig. 7A, to a disengaged/unlocked position by displacing the lock actuation member 604 in the negative Y-axis direction. As the lock actuation member 604 translates along the Y-axis, the pinned connection between the lock actuation member 604 and the strap locking member 608 pulls the strap locking member 608 out of the YZ-plane, rotating the strap locking member 608 about the pivot axis 636 in an unlock rotation direction 640. As described above, the pivot axis 636 may be defined by at least one pin 632 disposed in the strap locking member 608 and attached to a portion of the housing 102 and/or temple 124. Once the strap locking member 608 is disengaged from the locked position, the strap 132 may be allowed to move forward (e.g., toward the visor 116 and/or front of the HMD 100) under the pulling force, or tension, provided by the strap tension device 612. This movement is illustrated in Fig. 7B where the locking key feature 610 of the strap 132 is displaced in the Z-axis direction toward the front of the HMD 100. It should be noted that in Figs. 7A-D, the strap locking member 608 remains fixed along the Z-axis relative to the housing 102 and/or temple 124.

[0093] Fig. 7C shows a schematic view of the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 in a third, strap-adjusted, state 700C. In this state 700C, the strap 132 is pulled in a head size perimeter expanding direction 720, along the Z-axis, against the pulling force provided by the strap tension device 612. The strap 132 is pulled in this direction 720 while the lock actuation member 604 is maintained (e.g., held) in a displaced, or actuated, state keeping the strap locking member 608 rotated out of the locking position in the YZ-plane.

[0094] Fig. 7D shows a schematic view of the quick adjustment strap locking system 600 in a fourth, strap-locked and adjusted, state 700D. As shown in Fig. 7D, the strap 132 is shown in a rearwardmost position (e.g., closest to a rear section of the housing 102 of the HMD 100, providing a maximum head size perimeter dimension adjustment) with the locking key feature 610 of the strap 132 engaged with a last locking feature 704 in the linear array of locking features 704. Once the last locking feature 704 of the strap locking member 608 is aligned with the locking key feature 610 of the strap 132, the lock actuation member 604 may be released allowing the spring element 626 to move the lock actuation member 604 back to the original undisplaced, or locked, position, which in turn rotates the strap locking member 608 into the YZ- plane such that the last locking feature 704 in the linear array of locking features 704 engages with the locking key feature 610 of the strap 132. This engagement locks the strap 132 from moving in the Z-axis direction and fixes the head size perimeter to the adjusted size (e.g., fixing the strap relative to the housing 102 and/or temple 124 of the HMD 100, etc.).

[0095] Fig. 8 A is a flow diagram of a method 800 for donning an HMD 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. While a general order for the steps of the method 800 is shown in Fig. 8A, the method 800 can include more or fewer steps or can arrange the order of the steps differently than those shown in Fig. 8A. Generally, the method 800 starts with a start operation 804 and ends with an end operation 828. Hereinafter, the method 800 shall be explained with reference to the systems, components, assemblies, devices, environments, etc. described in conjunction with Figs. 1-7D and Fig. 8B.

[0096] The method 800 begins by providing an HMD 100 including a quick adjustment strap locking system 600 (step 804). Next, the method 800 proceeds by translating, or depressing, the lock actuation member 604 from a first position (e.g., a lock position) to a second position (e.g., an unlock position) (step 808). As provided above, this displacement or translation of the lock actuation member 604 rotates the strap locking member 608 out of the strap locking position in the YZ-plane and disengages the locking feature 704 of the strap locking member 608 from the locking key feature 610 of the strap 132.

[0097] Next, the method 800 may proceed by lifting the HMD 100 above the head of a user and positioning a rearmost portion of the strap 132 (e.g., an occipital contact point disposed at a center of the closed loop the strap 132) at, adjacent to, in contact with, and/or under the occipital bone or protuberance of the head of the user (step 812).

[0098] The method 800 continues by pulling the HMD 100 (e.g., by the frame, temples 124A- B, and/or housing 102) toward a front of the head of the user (e.g., opposite the occipital protuberance), while continuing to hold the lock actuation member 604 down (step 816). This step allows the strap 132 to move relative to the housing 102 and resize the head size perimeter to fit the head of the user. As the strap is unlocked, the tension force provided by the strap tension device 612 allows a user to move the HMD 100 while the strap 132 automatically adjusts in size. As such, the user may place the forehead contact pad 308, or smart leaf 104, in contact with the forehead area of the head, seating the HMD 100 in place (step 820). The bottom portion of the smart leaf 104 registers with a reference point on or near the glabella. The frame 304 may flex to conform to a user’s head shape. Additionally or alternatively, the contact pad 308 can also compress to compensate for variations in the user’s head shape.

[0099] At this point, the user may continue to make adjustments to the strap 132 size by moving the HMD 100 relative to the head of the user, while maintaining the lock actuation member 604 in the second, unlocked, position (e.g., allowing the strap 132 to move in and out of the temple 124 until a desired size of the closed loop is found). As described above, once the desired sizing of the closed loop is determined, the lock actuation member 604 may be released rotating the strap locking member 608 into a locked position (step 824). It is an aspect of the present disclosure that once locked, the force from the strap tension device 612 is prevented from translating to the head of the user via the locking key feature 610 engaging with the locking feature 704. This engagement allows the tension force provided by the strap tension device 612 to pull on the locking features rather than pulling on, or applying pressure to, the head of the user.

[0100] It should be appreciated that the HMD 100 may incorporate one or two quick adjustment strap locking systems 600. For instance, the HMD 100 may include a first quick adjustment strap locking system 600 disposed at the first temple 124A and a second quick adjustment strap locking system 600 disposed at the second temple 124B of the HMD 100. In some embodiments, the adjustments described herein may be made to only one or both quick adjustment strap locking systems 600 to meet a desired fit and size. As shown in Fig. 8B, the HMD 100 includes two quick adjustment strap locking systems 600, one disposed at each temple 124A-B.

[0101] The features of the various embodiments described herein are not intended to be mutually exclusive. Instead, features and aspects of one embodiment may be combined with features or aspects of another embodiment. Additionally, the description of a particular element with respect to one embodiment may apply to the use of that particular element in another embodiment, regardless of whether the description is repeated in connection with the use of the particular element in the other embodiment.

[0102] Examples provided herein are intended to be illustrative and non-limiting. Thus, any example or set of examples provided to illustrate one or more aspects of the present disclosure should not be considered to comprise the entire set of possible embodiments of the aspect in question. Examples may be identified by the use of such language as“for example,”“such as,” “by way of example,”“e.g.,” and other language commonly understood to indicate that what follows is an example.

[0103] A number of variations and modifications of the disclosure can be used. It would be possible to provide for some features of the disclosure without providing others.

[0104] The present disclosure, in various embodiments, configurations, and aspects, includes components, methods, processes, systems and/or apparatus substantially as depicted and described herein, including various embodiments, subcombinations, and subsets thereof. Those of skill in the art will understand how to make and use the systems and methods disclosed herein after understanding the present disclosure. The present disclosure, in various embodiments, configurations, and aspects, includes providing devices and processes in the absence of items not depicted and/or described herein or in various embodiments, configurations, or aspects hereof, including in the absence of such items as may have been used in previous devices or processes, e.g., for improving performance, achieving ease, and/or reducing cost of implementation.

[0105] The foregoing discussion of the disclosure has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. The foregoing is not intended to limit the disclosure to the form or forms disclosed herein. In the foregoing Detailed Description for example, various features of the disclosure are grouped together in one or more embodiments, configurations, or aspects for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure. The features of the embodiments, configurations, or aspects of the disclosure may be combined in alternate embodiments, configurations, or aspects other than those discussed above. This method of disclosure is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed disclosure requires more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive aspects lie in less than all features of a single foregoing disclosed embodiment, configuration, or aspect. Thus, the following claims are hereby incorporated into this Detailed Description, with each claim standing on its own as a separate preferred embodiment of the disclosure.

[0106] Embodiments include a strap adjustment system for a head-mounted display device, comprising: an elongate strap locking member extending a length from a first end to a second end, the strap locking member including a locking feature disposed along the length, the locking feature configured to selectively engage with a mating locking feature disposed on a strap; a mechanism housing including at least one internal volume containing the strap locking member, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the mechanism housing at a pivot axis running the length of the strap locking member; and a lock actuation member disposed at least partially within the mechanism housing, the lock actuation member translatable along an axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis between first and second positions, the lock actuation member pivotally connected to the strap locking member at a rotation axis offset from the pivot axis by a non-zero distance, the rotation axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis, wherein in the first position the strap locking member is in a strap-locked position, and wherein in the second position the strap locking member is pivoted from the strap-locked position into a strap-unlocked position. [0107] Aspects of the above strap adjustment system include wherein the locking feature includes a plurality of apertures disposed in a linear array along the length of the strap locking member. Aspects of the above strap adjustment system further comprising: a strap having a first end disposed within a portion of the mechanism housing, wherein the strap includes a locking key feature disposed adjacent to the first end of the strap and protruding in a direction perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein the locking key feature engages with at least one aperture of the plurality of apertures when the strap locking member is in the strap-locked position, and wherein the strap locking member is pivoted in a direction away from the strap and the locking key feature in the strap-unlocked position and the locking key feature is disengaged from the at least one aperture. Aspects of the above strap adjustment system further comprising: a strap tension device attached to the mechanism housing at an attachment point, wherein the strap tension device is operatively interconnected to the strap adjacent to the first end of the strap, wherein the strap tension device applies a tension force to the strap pulling the first end of the strap toward the attachment point. Aspects of the above strap adjustment system include wherein the strap tension device further comprises: a torsion spring having a first end and a second end disposed opposite the first end, wherein the torsion spring includes a coiled section of spring material disposed between the first and second ends of the torsion spring, wherein the first end of the torsion spring is fixed relative to the mechanical housing; a retractable band having a first and second end, wherein the first end of the retractable band is connected to the second end of the torsion spring, and wherein the second end of the retractable band is connected to the first end of the strap. Aspects of the above strap adjustment system include wherein the lock actuation member includes an interface contact portion exposed from the mechanism housing, and wherein the lock actuation member is biased in the first position via a compression spring disposed between the lock actuation member and a fixed point associated with the mechanism housing. Aspects of the above strap adjustment system include wherein the lock actuation member includes a slot disposed in a thickness of the lock actuation member, the slot running along the axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein a pin is disposed in the slot along the rotation axis, and wherein the strap locking member is pivotally connected to the pin via a hole or slot disposed in a protrusion formed in a portion of the strap locking member.

Aspects of the above strap adjustment system include wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the mechanism housing via a pin disposed at the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member, the pin extending into a receiving portion of the mechanism housing adjacent to the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member. Aspects of the above strap adjustment system include wherein the locking key feature is substantially rectangular in shape, and wherein each of the plurality of apertures is substantially rectangular in shape and sized to receive the locking key feature. Aspects of the above strap adjustment system include wherein the strap is adjustable relative to the mechanism housing along an axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis.

[0108] Embodiments include a head-mounted display device, comprising: a frame comprising a first temple portion disposed on a first side of the frame and a second temple portion disposed on an opposite second side of the frame; a forehead contact pad operatively connected to the frame and disposed at least partially between the first and second temple portions; at least one display device disposed between the first and second temple portions; a strap having a first end disposed adjacent to the first temple portion and a second end disposed adjacent to the second temple portion forming a closed loop defining a head size perimeter; and a strap adjustment system disposed within a housing portion of the first and/or second temple portion of the frame, the strap adjustment system comprising: an elongate strap locking member extending a length from a first end to a second end, the strap locking member including a locking feature disposed along the length, the locking feature configured to selectively engage with a mating locking feature disposed on a strap, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the housing portion at a pivot axis running the length of the strap locking member; and a lock actuation member disposed at least partially within the housing portion, the lock actuation member translatable along an axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis between first and second positions, the lock actuation member pivotally connected to the strap locking member at a rotation axis offset from the pivot axis by a non-zero distance, the rotation axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis, wherein in the first position the strap locking member is in a strap-locked position, and wherein in the second position the strap locking member is pivoted from the strap-locked position into a strap-unlocked position.

[0109] Aspects of the above head-mounted display device include wherein the strap includes at least one locking key feature disposed adjacent to the first and/or second end of the strap and protruding in a direction perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein the locking key feature engages with at least one aperture of the plurality of apertures when the strap locking member is in the strap-locked position, and wherein the strap locking member is pivoted in a direction away from the strap and the locking key feature in the strap-unlocked position and the locking key feature is disengaged from the at least one aperture. Aspects of the above head-mounted display device, further comprising: a strap tension device attached to the mechanism housing at an attachment point, wherein the strap tension device is operatively interconnected to the strap adjacent to the first end of the strap, wherein the strap tension device applies a tension force to the strap pulling the first end of the strap toward the attachment point. Aspects of the above head-mounted display device include wherein the strap tension device further comprises: a torsion spring having a first end and a second end disposed opposite the first end, wherein the torsion spring includes a coiled section of spring material disposed between the first and second ends of the torsion spring, wherein the first end of the torsion spring is fixed relative to the housing portion; a retractable band having a first and second end, wherein the first end of the retractable band is connected to the second end of the torsion spring, and wherein the second end of the retractable band is connected to the first end of the strap. Aspects of the above head-mounted display device include wherein the lock actuation member includes an interface contact portion exposed from the housing portion, and wherein the lock actuation member is biased in the first position via a compression spring disposed between the lock actuation member and a fixed point associated with the housing portion or frame. Aspects of the above head-mounted display device include wherein the lock actuation member includes a slot disposed in a thickness of the lock actuation member, the slot running along the axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis, wherein a pin is disposed in the slot along the rotation axis, and wherein the strap locking member is pivotally connected to the pin via a hole or slot disposed in a protrusion formed in a portion of the strap locking member. Aspects of the above head-mounted display device include wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the housing portion or frame via a pin disposed at the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member, the pin extending into a receiving portion of the housing portion or frame adjacent to the first and/or second ends of the strap locking member. Aspects of the above head-mounted display device include wherein the strap is adjustable relative to the mechanism housing along an axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis, wherein displacing the lock actuation member along the axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis causes the strap tension device to move the first end of the strap toward the first temple portion and/or the second end of the strap toward the second temple portion reducing the head size perimeter. Aspects of the above head-mounted display device include wherein the locking key feature is substantially rectangular in shape, and wherein each of the plurality of apertures is substantially rectangular in shape and sized to receive the locking key feature.

[0110] Embodiments include a method for donning an adjustable head-mounted display device, comprising: providing a head-mounted display device, comprising: a frame comprising a first temple portion disposed on a first side of the frame and a second temple portion disposed on an opposite second side of the frame; a forehead contact pad operatively connected to the frame and disposed at least partially between the first and second temple portions; at least one display device disposed between the first and second temple portions; a strap having a first end disposed adjacent to the first temple portion and a second end disposed adjacent to the second temple portion forming a closed loop defining a head size perimeter, the strap including an occipital contact point disposed at a center of the closed loop; and a strap adjustment system disposed within a housing portion of the first and/or second temple portion of the frame, the strap adjustment system comprising: an elongate strap locking member extending a length from a first end to a second end, the strap locking member including a locking feature disposed along the length, the locking feature configured to selectively engage with a mating locking feature disposed on a strap, wherein the strap locking member is pivotally coupled to the housing portion at a pivot axis running the length of the strap locking member; and a lock actuation member disposed at least partially within the housing portion, the lock actuation member translatable along an axis running substantially perpendicular to the pivot axis between first and second positions, the lock actuation member pivotally connected to the strap locking member at a rotation axis offset from the pivot axis by a non-zero distance, the rotation axis running substantially parallel to the pivot axis, wherein in the first position the strap locking member is in a strap-locked position, and wherein in the second position the strap locking member is pivoted from the strap-locked position into a strap-unlocked position; translating the lock actuation member from the first position to the second position; positioning the occipital contact point of the strap adjacent to an occipital bone or protuberance of a user’s head; pulling the frame of the head-mounted display device in a direction toward a frontal bone of the user’s head while maintaining the lock actuation member in the second position; seating the forehead contact pad against the frontal bone of the user’s head while maintaining the lock actuation member in the second position; and translating the lock actuation member from the second position to the first position, locking the strap and head-mounted display device in place on the user’s head.

[0111] Embodiments include a smart leaf coupled to a head-mounted display (HMD) for holding the HMD on a head of a user, comprising: a frame, wherein the frame has a first arcuate shape in a first plane and a second arcuate shape in a second plane, wherein first arcuate shape and the second arcuate shape allow the HMD to be placed and held on a forehead of the user; and a contact pad coupled to the frame, wherein the contact pad contacts the forehead of the user and cushions the frame.

[0112] Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the frame is made of a flexible material. Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the frame is made of a semi-rigid material. Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the semi-rigid material is one of a metal, a plastic, a composite, and/or a combination of two or more of a metal, a plastic, and/or a composite. Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the frame flexes to conform to a shape of the forehead of the user. Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the frame is positioned on or within proximity to the glabella of the user to register the HMD to the head of the user. Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the contact pad is made of a soft material. Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the soft material is one of a foam, an inflated product, a paper product, a loose- fill product, and/or a fiberboard product. Aspects of the above smart leaf include wherein the contact pad also has the first arcuate shape in the first plane and the second arcuate shape in the second plane, wherein first arcuate shape and the second arcuate shape allow the contact to be placed and held on a forehead of the user and to compensate for variations in the forehead of the user. Aspects of the above smart leaf wherein the frame further comprises: a substrate formed at a bottom of the frame, wherein the substrate is coupled to a housing of the HMD; and two or more ribs extending upwards from the substrate. Aspects of the above smart leaf wherein the substrate has the first arcuate shape and the ribs have the second arcuate shape. Aspects of the above smart leaf wherein the frame further comprises a connector that connects two or more ribs at a distal portion of the ribs, wherein the two or more ribs and/or the connector forms at least one void between the ribs.

[0113] Embodiments include a head-mounted display (HMD), comprising: a housing; optics coupled to the housing, the optics provide an image to an eye of a user; a smart leaf coupled to the housing, wherein the smart leaf comprises: a first arcuate shape in a first plane; a second arcuate shape in a second plane, wherein first arcuate shape and the second arcuate shape allow the smart leaf to be placed on a forehead of the user and be held by the smart leaf; and a bottom portion that registers to a reference point on or near the glabella on the forehead of the user, wherein registering the bottom portion to the reference point places the optics at a predetermined position in front of the eye of the user regardless of a first shape of the head of the user.

[0114] Aspects of the above HMD include wherein the smart leaf comprises: a frame, wherein the frame has a first arcuate shape in a first plane and a second arcuate shape in a second plane, wherein first arcuate shape and the second arcuate shape allow the smart leaf to be placed and held on the forehead of the user; a contact pad coupled to the frame, wherein the frame also has the first arcuate shape and the second arcuate shape, wherein the contact pad contacts the forehead of the user, compensates for variations in the first shape of the head of the user, and cushions the frame. Aspects of the above HMD include wherein the frame is made from a flexible material and the contact pad is made from a soft material. Aspects of the above HMD include wherein the frame flexes to conform to a second shape of the forehead of the user. Aspects of the above HMD include wherein the frame further comprises: a substrate formed at a bottom of the frame, wherein the substrate is coupled to a housing of the HMD; and two or more ribs extending upwards from the substrate. Aspects of the above HMD include wherein the substrate has the first arcuate shape and the ribs have the second arcuate shape.

[0115] Embodiments include a method of donning a head-mounted display (HMD), the method comprising: placing a strap over a back of a head of a user; expanding the strap to allow a smart leaf to position over a forehead of the user; registering a bottom portion of the smart leaf at a reference point, on or near a glabella, of the forehead of the user, wherein registering the bottom portion of the smart leaf at the reference point places optics of the HMD in a

predetermined position in front of an eye of the user regardless of a first shape of a head of the user, wherein the smart leaf comprises a first arcuate shape in a first plane and a second arcuate shape in a second plane, wherein first arcuate shape and the second arcuate shape allow the smart leaf to be placed on the forehead of the user and allow the smart leaf transfer a weight of the HMD to the forehead of the user.

[0116] Aspects of the above method further comprising the frame flexing to adjust to a second shape of the forehead of the user. Aspects of the above method further comprising the contact pad compressing or expanding to compensate for a variation in the second shape of the forehead of the user.

[0117] Any one or more of the aspects/embodiments as substantially disclosed herein.

[0118] Any one or more of the aspects/embodiments as substantially disclosed herein optionally in combination with any one or more other aspects/embodiments as substantially disclosed herein.

[0119] One or means adapted to perform any one or more of the above aspects/embodiments as substantially disclosed herein.

[0120] The phrases“at least one,”“one or more,”“or,” and“and/or” are open-ended expressions that are both conjunctive and disjunctive in operation. For example, each of the expressions“at least one of A, B and C,”“at least one of A, B, or C,”“one or more of A, B, and C,”“one or more of A, B, or C,”“A, B, and/or C,” and“A, B, or C” means A alone, B alone, C alone, A and B together, A and C together, B and C together, or A, B and C together.

[0121] The term“a” or“an” entity refers to one or more of that entity. As such, the terms“a” (or“an”),“one or more,” and“at least one” can be used interchangeably herein. It is also to be noted that the terms“comprising,”“including,” and“having” can be used interchangeably.

[0122] The term“automatic” and variations thereof, as used herein, refers to any process or operation, which is typically continuous or semi-continuous, done without material human input when the process or operation is performed. However, a process or operation can be automatic, even though performance of the process or operation uses material or immaterial human input, if the input is received before performance of the process or operation. Human input is deemed to be material if such input influences how the process or operation will be performed. Human input that consents to the performance of the process or operation is not deemed to be“material.” [0123] Aspects of the present disclosure may take the form of an embodiment that is entirely hardware, an embodiment that is entirely software (including firmware, resident software, micro- code, etc.) or an embodiment combining software and hardware aspects that may all generally be referred to herein as a“circuit,”“module,” or“system.” Any combination of one or more computer-readable medium(s) may be utilized. The computer-readable medium may be a computer-readable signal medium or a computer-readable storage medium.

[0124] A computer-readable storage medium may be, for example, but not limited to, an electronic, magnetic, optical, electromagnetic, infrared, or semiconductor system, apparatus, or device, or any suitable combination of the foregoing. More specific examples (a non-exhaustive list) of the computer-readable storage medium would include the following: an electrical connection having one or more wires, a portable computer diskette, a hard disk, a random access memory (RAM), a read-only memory (ROM), an erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM or Flash memory), an optical fiber, a portable compact disc read-only memory (CD- ROM), an optical storage device, a magnetic storage device, or any suitable combination of the foregoing. In the context of this document, a computer-readable storage medium may be any tangible medium that can contain or store a program for use by or in connection with an instruction execution system, apparatus, or device.

[0125] A computer-readable signal medium may include a propagated data signal with computer-readable program code embodied therein, for example, in baseband or as part of a carrier wave. Such a propagated signal may take any of a variety of forms, including, but not limited to, electro-magnetic, optical, or any suitable combination thereof. A computer-readable signal medium may be any computer-readable medium that is not a computer-readable storage medium and that can communicate, propagate, or transport a program for use by or in connection with an instruction execution system, apparatus, or device. Program code embodied on a computer-readable medium may be transmitted using any appropriate medium, including, but not limited to, wireless, wireline, optical fiber cable, RF, etc., or any suitable combination of the foregoing.

[0126] The terms“determine,”“calculate,”“compute,” and variations thereof, as used herein, are used interchangeably and include any type of methodology, process, mathematical operation or technique.