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Title:
ROOF MOUNTING SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2022/157600
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention relates to a roof mounting system with a locating and waterproofing device (100) which is formed from a water impermeable medium. The device has a short edge (104) which is dimensioned to rest against and be secured to a batten (121) and a long edge (106), whose upper portion rests on an upper surface of the batten (121). A lower portion of the locating and waterproofing device rests on a lower slate or stone (10A) and is sandwiched between the lower slate or stone (10A) and an upper slate or stone (10B) so that a continuous barrier (102) is formed along the long edge (106) to provide a water resistant barrier and to create a void (116) between the lower slate or stone (10A) and the upper slate or stone (10B).

More Like This:
WO/2009/095272A LINK BATTEN
Inventors:
MAKIN REECE (GB)
Application Number:
PCT/IB2022/050198
Publication Date:
July 28, 2022
Filing Date:
January 12, 2022
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
ADVERGE LTD (GB)
International Classes:
E04D12/00; E04D1/36
Domestic Patent References:
WO2000066853A12000-11-09
WO2000022256A12000-04-20
WO1995016085A11995-06-15
Foreign References:
GB2513379A2014-10-29
AU2015249111A12015-11-19
GB2513379A2014-10-29
JPH04327636A1992-11-17
US5794396A1998-08-18
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WALKER, Neville (GB)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1 . A locating and waterproofing device (100) is formed from a water impermeable medium, the device has a short edge (104) which is dimensioned to rest against, and be secured to a batten (121 ); and a long edge (106), whose upper portion rests on an upper surface of the batten (121 ) and whose lower portion rests on a lower slate or stone (10A) and is sandwiched between the lower slate or stone (10A) and an upper slate or stone (10B), wherein a continuous barrier (102) is formed along the long edge (106) to provide a water resistant barrier and to create a void (116) between the lower slate or stone (10A) and the upper slate or stone (10B).

2. A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to claim 1 wherein the continuous barrier (102) is formed as a curved corner between the short edge (104) and the long edge (106).

3. A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to claim 1 wherein the continuous barrier (102) is formed as a bead which is bonded to the long edge (106).

4. A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to claim 1 when used with thin slates wherein the upstanding short edge (104) with the planar member (10) beyond the continuous barrier (102) for fixing in the close boarded configuration.

5. A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim wherein a raised portion (108) is provided on the long edge (106) between the continuous barrier (102) and a tip (1 12) of the long edge (106).

6. A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to claim 5 wherein the raised portion (108) is an undulation formed integrally with the long edge (106). A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to claim 5 wherein the raised portion (108) is formed as a bead which is bonded to the long edge (106). A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim wherein a strip (15) is provided on the long edge (106). A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim is formed from a synthetic plastics material. A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to claim 9 wherein the synthetic plastics material is polypropylene and/or glass reinforced polymers (GRP). A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim wherein the device is provided in a length less than 6.0 m, preferably less than 4.0 m and most preferably less than 2.0 m. A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim wherein the thickness of the device is between 0.5 mm and 1 .5 mm, preferably 1 mm A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim wherein the length of the short edge (104) is between 1.0 cm and 3.5 cm, preferably between 2.0 cm and 3.5 cm and most preferably between 2.5 cm . A locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim wherein the length of the long edge (106) is between 20 cm and 60 cm, preferably according to the corresponding variable size of slates being used A roof mounting system includes the locating and waterproofing device (100) according to any preceding claim and further comprises at least one foam member (15) which is located on a lower surface of the lower slate or stone (10A) member. A method of installing a locating and waterproofing device (100), resting a short edge (104) of the device (100) against a batten (121 ) and securing the device to the batten (121 ) using a securement means so that a long edge (106) of the device rests on an upper surface of the batten (121 ) and so that a lower portion of the device (100) rests on a lower slate or stone (10A); placing an upper slate or stone (10B) on the locating and waterproofing device (100), so that the locating and waterproofing device (100) is sandwiched between the lower slate or stone (10A) and thereby forming a continuous barrier (102) along the long edge (106) to provide a water resistant barrier; and creating a void (1 16) between the lower slate or stone (10A) and the upper slate or stone (10B). A method of installing a locating and waterproofing device (100) according to claim 16 and securing the upper slate or stone (10B) with a slate hook 300.

Description:
ROOF MOUNTING SYSTEM

FIELD

The present invention relates to a roof mounting system for use with traditional as well as reconstituted stone roofing slates for improving traditional mounting and waterproofing methods.

In particular, the present invention relates to a roof mounting system which enables roofing materials, such as tiles or slates, to be mounted using a single lap format thereby reducing the weight, cost and installation time involved whilst also improving the performance of the resultant roof covering.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Stone has been used in roofing for many years. Stone slates are usually sedimentary shale that can be split and then shaped into relatively flat layers that can be laid onto timber supports to form a resilient roof covering. The modern embodiment of stone roofing has the stone more consistently cut. In the past 30 or so years, reconstituted (concrete) stone versions have become established and those have taken the most popular sizes and established a more regimented installation method. There are many different sizes of stone, but in essence and for simplification, twelve different sizes are commonly used and consist of (height x width): eaves tiles 17” x 20” (43.18 cm x 50.8 cm); top tiles 12” x 12” (30.48cm x 30.48 cm) and 12” x 18” (30,48 cm x 45.72 cm) and a combination of nine other tiles 22”, 26” and 30” high by 12”, 18” and 24” wide.

Special order lengths of tiles or slates also exist. The in situ loading weight of these tiles is approximately 120 to 140 kg/m 2 . The method of installation, shown in Figures 1 and 2, is called random widths (AR) and diminishing lengths (AD) taking account of the various widths and gradually decreasing lengths of the slates. This method can also be described as discontinuous roofing.

The method of installation shown in Figures 1 and 2, is predominantly for domestic dwelling applications and is used after a timber frame roof has been constructed using rafters (R) and covered in a roofing membrane (M) and then overlaid in an opposite direction using timber spas known as ‘battens’ (T). In specific situations, roofs subject to extreme weather events have rafters additionally directly covered with boarding or plywood. This roofing technique is known as close boarding.

Battens are specifically positioned up the roof and over the roof at a set distance which is called the ‘gauge’ (G). Battens are often nail fixed into position through the membrane and into the rafters.

Stones traditionally had holes bored through their top portion and sticks or pegs (P) were dropped through the holes. Slates are laid on top of the battens (T) so that pegs hook over the top upper edge of the batten and the stone, using gravity, is held in place. Modern roofs use aluminium or copper pegs with a large head rather like a wide nail without a point.

Starting by using the longest stones from the selection available to a person who constructs the roof, known as a roofer, these stones are laid on the roof in a line transversely across the roof called a course (as shown in Figure 2), using a random selection of the widths (AR) available for that length (AD) (or height or gauge) along a particular course.

The first course or ‘eaves course’ is a shorter slate for example at 17” (43.18 cm) long and this is the start of installing the slates and usually overhangs into the gutter. This first course is then fully overlaid by the second course of a longer 30” (76.2 cm) slate and thus the slates move up the roof some 13” (33.02 cm) which is obtained by subtracting the height of a second course 30 from the first course. This is the course layout and is the method by which the batten gauge is set. The third course of another line of 13” (33.02 cm) slates is then installed and this is laid over the top half of the second slate by around 17” (43.18 cm) which means that the third course also covers the top 4” (10.16 cm) of first course in what is referred to as a “double lap” (as shown in Figures 1 and 2). This slate also has a 13” (33.02 cm) batten gauge.

Where the slates abut each other (or sit side by side) in each course there is an obvious gap or open vertical abutment joint (VJ), this joint is called the perpendicular joint or ’perp join’.

The double lap (DL) method as described herein, and illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, is important to prevent any wind driven rain that enters a perp join (formed between adjacent tiles) from being forced over the top of the tile and entering the roof space and damaging its structure, causing failure in the waterproof requirement of the roof covering.

When the second course of slates is installed, it is critical that the perp join of the course above is positioned above the centre of the tile below by at least 4” (10.16 cm) to either side. This is achieved by using the correct selection of one the different widths that are available and thus this method continues up the roof alternating for each course in an application called ‘broken bond’.

Each course is pre-planned to use the correct amount for the width of building per project. The height of the stones is reduced as the roofer ascends a roof, although the 4” (10.16 cm) double lap of slates below, must be maintained. This installation method of varying widths (AR, BR) getting smaller in height (AD, BD) ascending up the roof is the random and diminishing style.

Another traditional roof construction style of double lap uses regularised and uniform thin units of stone known as roofing slates. These are installed using the same method of waterproofing as the stone with the difference being that they offer a uniform and regularised alternative appearance when installed. Thin slates can also be fixed directly to close boarding as an alternative to batten fixing. A primary function of the roof is to remain watertight. Therefore, the primary weakness or primary point of water ingress in double lap roof coverings is through the vertical ‘perp’ joins (VJ) that are part of the double lap stone roofing described above.

It is therefore necessary to overlay joins in the double lap format so that water entering the join will land on the slate below and this water, using the angle or pitch of the roof, will then descend down the slate below and exits on the surface margin or outer area of the slate.

The secondary weakness on the roof occurs at the front edge of the slates as they lap (L), externally onto the slate below, rainwater runs down the open plain or surface margin of the slate and over the front edge of the bottom of the slate. As the water drips onto the slate below, wind can drive or push this back under the slate above and between the slate below. Depending on the pitch of the roof the rain being pushed between the slates is rarely if ever pushed more than a few centimetres and it is this distance that sets the double lap installation requirement of 4” (10.16 cm) when installing the roof. Any water that is driven or enters between the layer of the slate will often find the predrilled holes that were created to accommodate the pegs (P) or nails when fixing the slates.

It is often that these holes represent the point of ingress should a waterproofing system fail. Because this method, through the traditionally large amount of slates required, is heavy and quite inefficient in both method and performance, then the angle that the roof is framed (PI) should often exceed 40°. This angle is called the angle of pitch (OPI) and is an integral part of the waterproofing of this type of roof.

Furthermore as the angle of pitch reduces there is a risk that a greater sideways or lateral component force from wind is able to lift tiles or slates or cause them to vibrate. This phenomenon is known as chatter and can give rise to rattling of slates in higher winds. The problem is exacerbated when roofs face into a prevailing wind. In wet or rainy weather, as mentioned above, there is the risk that rainwater or snow is pushed between slates or tiles, with the risk of water ingress which can lead to damp or rotting of joists or timbers, which in extremes cases has led to a roof failing.

PRIOR ART

Australian patent application AU 20152491 1 1 (SCG Building Materials Co ltd) discloses a weatherproof enhanced roofing system which comprises a plurality of elongated roofing material support battens arranged to be secured to a roof structure in spaced-apart, parallel relationship, whereby a plurality of roofing material pieces are arranged in rows having an upper-end portion supported by one batten and a lower- end portion supported by the next lower batten. A plurality of spaced-apart, parallel weather strips are engaged with the roofing material pieces and are secured onto the battens.

UK patent application GB 2 513 379 (Makin) discloses a device which retains the aesthetic appearance of a roof when installed and which permits the pitch of the roof to be reduced to a desired angle.

Japanese patent application JPH 04327636 (Gantan Beauty Kogyo KK) discloses a roof construction method wherein levelling boards are made light weight which makes handling roofing materials easier but ensures that the roofing materials are not liable to be lifted in strong winds. United States patent US 5 794 396 (Gibbs) discloses a roof mounting assembly that includes rows of pans mounted to an under structure of a roof by hooking the pans around support tracks. Rows of roofing panels are mounted over the respective rows of pans with adjacent roofing panels generally abutting each other to create a joint located above the central area of an underlying pan so that the pan acts as a barrier to prevent rainwater and the like from flowing through the joint.

International patent application WO-A-0022256 (Jeeves) roofing system comprises a plurality of tiles and a plurality of securing and waterproofing means for securing tiles to a roof structure. The tile comprises a first portion for mounting to an upper batten of a roof structure, a second portion to extend between the upper batten and a lower batten of the roof structure, and a receiving means.

International patent application WO 9516085 (Marley Building Materials ltd) discloses a weathering member which is positioned between two adjacent tiles on a roof to catch water passing between them and feed it onto a tile in the row below. The weathering member has upstands which engage in recesses in the under surfaces of tiles.

The installation of roof materials using double lap installation involves a large amount of roof materials, and is therefore heavy, time intensive and costly. There is therefore a need for a roof mounting system which can be assembled using less roof materials and is therefore lighter whilst also providing improved performance.

There is a need for a roof mounting system which can be assembled in a single lap format, thereby requiring less roof materials.

The invention addresses these needs, reduces the amount of loading on a roof by using less weight of stone or slate and ensures that the roof mounting system is watertight and weatherproof as well as presenting an aesthetically pleasing and natural appearance.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

According to a first aspect of the present invention, there is provided a locating and waterproofing device is formed from a water impermeable medium, the device has a short edge which is dimensioned to rest against, and be secured to a batten; and a long edge, whose upper portion rests on an upper surface of the batten and whose lower portion rests on a lower slate or stone and is sandwiched between the lower slate or stone and an upper slate or stone, wherein a continuous barrier is formed along the long edge to provide a water resistant barrier and to create a void between the lower slate or stone and the upper slate or stone.

Optionally the batten can be extended inline to fix directly to a flat board.

An advantage of the void is that is creates a space for air to flow laterally along a horizontal line of a roof and importantly acts as a barrier to moisture which may be wicked upwards between slates or tiles under capillary action which is sometimes referred to as creep. This barrier results in any moisture that may ingress being arrested locally and thereby prevents moisture from entering a roof space or contacting a batten.

Preferably the continuous barrier is formed as a curved corner between the short edge and the long edge.

In some embodiments the continuous barrier is formed as a bead which is bonded to the long edge.

The device may be extruded with the bead formed at the same time.

In some embodiments a raised portion is provided on the long edge between the continuous barrier and a tip of the long edge. Ideally the raised portion is an undulation formed integrally with the long edge. Optionally this raised portion may also be formed during extrusion.

In some embodiments the raised portion is formed as a bead which is bonded to the long edge.

Optionally a foam strip is provided on the long edge. This helps to reduce chatter

Preferably the locating and waterproofing device is formed from a synthetic plastics material. For example, the synthetic plastics material is polypropylene and/or glass reinforced polymers (GRP).

The locating and waterproofing device is ideally provided in a length less than 6.0 m, preferably less than 4.0 m and most preferably less than 2.0 m.

Ideally the thickness of the device is between 0.5 mm and 1 .5 mm, preferably 1 .0mm. Ideally the height of the curved corner bead is between 5mm and 50mm preferably 6mm when corresponding to thin slates and 20mm when corresponding to stone slates.

Ideally the length of the short edge is between 1 .0 cm and 3.5 cm, preferably between 2.0 cm and 3.5 cm and most preferably 2.5 cm .

Preferably the length of the long edge is between 20.0 cm and 60.0 cm, preferably according to the corresponding variable size of slates being used .

The invention is provided as part of a roof mounting system which optionally further comprises at least one foam member which is located on a lower surface of the lower slate or stone member.

According to another aspect of the invention there is provided a method of assembling a roof mounting system as described comprising the steps of: applying the locating and waterproofing device directly onto close boarding..

The locating and waterproofing device is preferably a single-lap format roof mounting system. The term “single-lap” is used herein to refer to a configuration in which only a front leading edge of a roof material in a second course rests on the rear trailing edge of the roof material in a first course located below the second course.

The roof mounting system of the present invention can be used to mount roof materials (such as for example roofing slates, stones or slabs) more efficiently in a single-lap format, thereby requiring a reduced amount of roof materials to cover a roofing structure. The roof mounting system of the present invention can therefore be used to assemble a roof more efficiently in a single-lap format and at a reduced overall weight and cost.

The installed roof has the same aesthetic appeal as roofs installed using the conventional double-lap format. However, due to the use of single-lap installation with the roof mounting system of the present invention, a much shorter length of roof material (tile, stone, slate or slab) is required (43% less) in order to cover the same roof structure. As a result, the use of the roof mounting system of the present invention provides a resultant roof which is significantly lighter than a corresponding roof formed using a double-lap format. As a result, use of the roof mounting system of the present invention requires less underlying supporting structure to support the roof. Use of the roof mounting system of the present invention therefore also reduces the costs, materials and time required to provide the roof covering as well as the underlying supporting structure. Use of the aforementioned roof mounting system improves the overall water and weatherproofing ability of the roof covering so that the overall performance is improved especially in regard to the minimum pitch of the roof onto which the locating and waterproofing device is installed.

Optionally an abutment feature is provided with the locating and waterproofing device. The abutment feature is dimensioned and arranged to engage with a slot or groove formed in an underside of a slab or slate, from below as herein described.

Preferably, the at least one abutment feature is an upstanding member extending at an angle to, preferably extending substantially perpendicular, to the plane defined by the planar member (for example the plane defined by the lower surface of the planar member). The upstanding member preferably provides an abutment surface for abutting a roof batten. The upstanding member may for example be a lip portion. The locating and waterproofing device may comprise a plurality of abutment features. The abutment features may be spaced apart from each other, for example uniformly spaced apart from each other along or adjacent the front end of the planar member. The abutment features may for example be a plurality of spaced apart (for example uniformly spaced apart) lip portions.

Alternatively, the locating and waterproofing device might also have one or more upstanding members extended in line with the planar member beyond the curved bead so that the locating and waterproofing device, in the alternative, might utilise additional fixings and may be used on a close boarded roof, whilst at the same time and in the same manner, retaining the required waterproofing requirements of the roof.

The locating and waterproofing device may be formed from one or more of: metal (for example aluminium), synthetic plastics and/or glass reinforced polymers (GRP). Preferably, however the locating and waterproofing device is formed from GRP.

The properties of GRP do not permit the formation of tight right angles that are required when an upstanding member is formed perpendicular to and from the same planar member. Therefore, the GRP can be formed into a specially adapted outward and downward curved portions. They can be used to allow a resilient and accurate fixing to a roofing batten. When this curve is applied in an outward and downward position, as is required with heavier stone slates, then it ensures that the weight of stone is appropriately transferred to the roof structure. The curve is then used in conjunction with the mounting rail that has a curve of same size and shape, that precisely engages the curve on the GRP and the two curves, are held together by way of gravity. Thus the stone is therefore also held in position on the roof structure. When the curve is used with the stone slates then it is positioned in an upwards and outwards manner that is used as a secondary barrier to prevent wind driven rain that is sometimes driven over the top of slates and so prevents water from entering the roof structure.

Stone slates allow the movement of air by a method known as fortuitous ventilation. The waterproofing properties have the adverse effect of restricting the free movement of moist air that can sometimes collect beneath the stone slates. This moist air will rise to the highest point of the roof apex (the ridge) and the system therefore incorporates a specially designed ridge ventilation device.

The waterproofing element preferably further comprises at least one foam member located on the lower surface of the planar member. The waterproofing element may comprise a plurality of spaced apart foam members located on the lower surface of the planar member. The foam member(s) are preferably located at or adjacent an opposed second end of the planar member.

The foam member may have any suitable shape and/or dimensions, such as between 10 mm and 40 mm wide and between 1 mm and 30 mm thick.

In one embodiment, the foam member is shaped and dimensioned to cover, and preferably engage, at least a portion of a join between adjacent roof materials. In one embodiment, the foam member is substantially wedge shaped. In one embodiment, the foam member is positioned such that an apex of the wedge-shape is configured to be received within and to engage at least a portion of the join formed between adjacent roof materials.

In one embodiment, the waterproofing element further comprises an adhesive portion. The adhesive portion may be located adjacent one or more edges of the waterproofing element to ensure overlaps are sealed.

Optionally a first engagement feature of the locating and waterproofing device comprises a first upstanding portion located at or adjacent a lower surface of the elongate body portion of the locating and waterproofing device and extending outwardly therefrom. The second engagement feature of the locating and waterproofing device preferably comprises a second upstanding portion located at or adjacent an upper surface of the elongate body portion of the locating and waterproofing device and extending outwardly therefrom.

The first and second upstanding portions preferably extend at an angle to a plane defined by the elongate body portion of the locating and waterproofing device . The first and second upstanding portions preferably extend substantially perpendicular to the plane defined by the elongate body portion and in opposite directions to each other.

In one embodiment, the first and second upstanding portions of the first and second engagement features of the locating and waterproofing device are axially aligned.

The first engagement feature of the locating and waterproofing device may be located at or adjacent a first side portion of the elongate body portion of the locating and waterproofing device. The second engagement feature of the locating and waterproofing device may be located at or adjacent a second opposed side portion of the elongate body portion of the locating and waterproofing device .

In one embodiment, the first engagement feature and an adjacent portion of the lower surface of the elongate body portion of the locating and waterproofing device define a hook portion configured to engage a roof batten. The hook portion provided by the first engagement feature and the adjacent portion of the lower surface of the locating and waterproofing device defines an abutment surface extending therebetween configured to abut surface(s) of an underlying roof batten.

At least one of the first and/or second engagement features of the locating and waterproofing device may comprise at least one projection extending outwardly away from an axis defined by the first and/or second upstanding portions. In one embodiment, at least one of the first and/or second engagement features comprises a plurality of spaced apart projections located along the length of and extending outwardly away from the axis defined by the first and/or second upstanding portions.

The locating and waterproofing device may further comprise at least one mounting portion comprising a mounting body portion configured to be mounted on at least one of the first and/or second upstanding portions of the first and/or second engagement features. For example, the at least on mounting body portion preferably comprises a slot or recess configured to receive and engage at least a portion of a corresponding first or second upstanding portion of the first or second engagement features.

In one embodiment, the at least one mounting portion comprises at least one projection extending outwardly away from an axis defined by the mounting body portion and/or an axis defined by the first and/or second upstanding portions. The at least one projection may for example be resiliently deformable. The at least one projection may be resiliently biased to extend outwardly away from the axis defined by the mounting body portion and/or an axis defined by the first and/or second upstanding portions.

The mounting body portion may be composed of plastic, for example extruded plastic.

In one embodiment, the at least one mounting portion comprises a plurality of spaced apart projections located along the length of and extending outwardly away from the axis defined by the mounting body portion.

The plurality of spaced apart projections may extend radially from the mounting body portion.

The plurality of spaced apart projections may be spaced apart from each other about the periphery of the mounting body portion.

The projection(s) may have any suitable shape and/or dimensions. In one embodiment, the projection(s) may be ribs.

The first engagement feature of the locating and waterproofing device may comprise at least one guide feature configured to locate at least one fixing member, for example a nail or a screw, for securement therethrough to a surface of an underlying roof batten. The guide feature may for example be a portion of reduced thickness of the first engagement feature.

The locating and waterproofing device is preferably composed of metal, for example aluminium.

The locating and waterproofing device may have any suitable transverse cross- sectional shape. For example, the locating and waterproofing device may have a substantially cross-shaped transverse cross-section. In one embodiment, the locating and waterproofing device has a substantially Z-shaped transverse cross-section.

According to a second aspect of the present invention there is provided a method of installing a locating and waterproofing device, resting a short edge of the device against a batten and securing the device to the batten using a securement means so that a long edge of the device rests on an upper surface of the batten and so that a lower portion of the device rests on a lower slate or stone; placing an upper slate or stone on the locating and waterproofing device, so that the locating and waterproofing device is sandwiched between the lower slate or stone and thereby forming a continuous barrier along the long edge to provide a water resistant barrier; and creating a void between the lower slate or stone and the upper slate or stone.

Optionally the upper slate or stone is secured with a slate hook and/or additional nonferrous screw fixings.

The method may further comprise: obtaining an locating and waterproofing device comprising: an elongate body portion, a first engagement feature, and a second engagement feature; placing the locating and waterproofing device in position adjacent the at least one abutment feature and an upper surface of the planar member of the waterproofing element such that the elongate body portion extends substantially parallel to an underlying roof batten, in which the first engagement feature of the locating and waterproofing device is positioned to engage the underlying roof batten, and in which the second engagement feature is positioned to be received within and to engage an opening provided in a lower surface of an overlaying roof material; and positioning a roof material such that a lower surface thereof is received on an upper surface of the planar member of the waterproofing element, and the second engagement feature of the waterproofing element is received within an opening provided in the lower surface of the roof material.

The method may further comprise securing the locating and waterproofing device in position by securing the first engagement feature to the underlying roof batten or directly onto close boarding using at least one fixing member.

The method may further comprise forming one or more openings, for example channels or recesses, within the lower surface of the roof material. Embodiments of the present invention will be now described in more detail with particular reference to Figure 13 and reference to the remaining Figures generally.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES

Figure 1 is a schematic illustration of a cross-sectional view of a traditional double lap roof;

Figure 2 is a schematic illustration of an exploded view of a traditional stone roof installed in the double lap format;

Figure 3 is a schematic illustration of a cross-sectional view of a stone roof using the roof mounting system according to one embodiment of the present invention to provide a single-lap format roof;

Figure 4 is a schematic illustration of an exploded view of a stone roof installed in the single lap format using the roof mounting system according to one embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 5 is a schematic illustration of a cross-sectional view of a stone roof using the roof mounting system according to one embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 6 is a schematic illustration of a cross-sectional view of the foam wedge in the perp join of the roof mounting system according to one embodiment of the present invention;

Figures 7 and 8 are schematic illustrations of a cross-sectional view and a perspective view of an locating and waterproofing device of the roof mounting system according to one embodiment of the present invention;

Figures 9 and 10 are schematic illustrations of a cross-sectional view and a perspective view of the locating and waterproofing device of the roof mounting system according to a further embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 1 1 is a schematic illustration of a cross-sectional view of the abutment feature of the roof mounting system according to one embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 12 is a schematic illustration of a cross-sectional view of a ridge system utilising a roof mounting system and ventilation rail according to one embodiment of the present invention; Figure 13 is a schematic illustration of a cross sectional view, when used with thin stone slates, and when incorporating the hook fixing method;

Figure 14 is a schematic illustration of a cross sectional view of ae valley junction of two rooves;

Figure 15 is a schematic illustration of a cross sectional view of the soaker embodiment required for a wall abutment; and

Figure 16 is a schematic illustration of a ridge vent system that utilises the rib engagement system as shown in Figure 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

With reference to Figures 3 to 6, a single-lap format roof covering is illustrated using the roof mounting system 1 according to embodiments of the present invention.

The timber roof is constructed using rafters (R) and covered in a roofing membrane M) and then overlaid in an opposite direction using timber spas known as ‘battens’ (T). Battens are specifically positioned up the roof and over roof at a set distance called the ‘gauge’ (G). Battens are often nail fixed into position through the membrane and into the rafters.

Starting by using the longest stones (or other suitable roof material such as slate, tiles or slabs) from the selection available to the roofer, these stones are laid on the roof in a line transversely across the roof called a course (Figure 4), using a random selection of the widths (BR) available for that length (BD) (or height or gauge) on that course.

The first course or ‘eaves course’ is a shorter stone for example at 17” (43.2 cm) long and this is the start of installing the slates and usually overhangs into the gutter.

A waterproofing element (F) composed of water-impermeable material is provided. The waterproofing element (F) is a permanently resilient front plate composed of glass reinforced polymer (GRP). It is however to be understood that in some embodiments, the waterproofing element may be composed of metal (for example aluminium) or other suitable plastics.

The waterproofing element (F) comprises a planar member 10 defining a lower surface 1 1 and further comprises at least one abutment feature 12 extending from the lower surface of the planar member 10, at or adjacent a first end thereof, configured for abutment with a roof batten. The abutment feature 12 has a first end 13 located adjacent the lower surface 11 of the planar member 10 and an opposed free end 14. A pre-adhered foam strip 15 is located adjacent the second opposed end of the planar member 10.

The waterproofing element (F) is shaped and dimensioned such that the lower surface 1 1 of the planar member 10 is to be positioned adjacent the upper surfaces 2 of a pair of adjacent roof materials 4 in the underlying first course and to extend across a join (VJ) provided therebetween to prevent water ingress therethrough.

The waterproofing element (F) is arranged to extend from adjacent or at the rear trailing edge 6 and towards the front leading edge 8 of the underlying roof materials 4.

For ease of installation the waterproofing element (F) may have a pre-determined length and in order to adequately cover the width of the whole roof the waterproofing element (F) can be easily lapped over each at the point that they abut each other. A strip of adhesive tape may be provided onto the sides of the lapped section so that this lap joined is permanently sealed during installation.

In one embodiment, the water proofing element (F) may be cut to size as required for a particular pair of adjacent roof materials and the join provided therebetween.

The abutment feature 12 of the waterproofing element (F) is provided in the form of a downwardly extending lip incorporating a locating curve 101 that is extending from the lower surface 1 1 of the planar member 10. The lip 12 has an inner surface 16 configured to abut an underlying roof batten (T) and an opposed outer surface 18. The inner surface 16 of the lip 12 together with an adjacent portion of the lower surface 11 of the planar member 10 and in conjunction with 101 form a hook portion. The lip (in particular the hook portion) of the waterproofing element is placed to hook over and abut a portion of the underlying roof batten (T). It is to be understood that the abutment feature 12 may extend at any suitable angle relative to the plane defined by the planar member. Preferably, the abutment feature 12 (e.g. lip) extends substantially perpendicular to the plane defined by the planar member.

Referring now to a preferred embodiment of the invention shown in Figure 13 is suitably adjusted for the installation of thin stone slates 1 a whereby the planar member 10 incorporates a locating and waterproofing device upwards curve 102, the curve, in conjunction with the capillary void 116 resists the further transfer of water and facilitates the use standard slate slates hooks 300.

Once in position between adjacent courses of roof materials, the foam strip 15 of the waterproofing element 10 prevents wind driven rain from penetrating underneath the leading edge of the roof material 4.

Figure 6 illustrates the system 1 further comprising foam wedges 34 which are shaped and dimensioned such that at least an apex of the wedge 34 can be received within a join formed between adjacent roof materials. The wedges 34 may be elongate in shape and extend along a length of the join between the adjacent roof materials. The system 1 may comprise a plurality of foam wedges, each wedge being configured to be received within a corresponding join formed between adjacent roof materials. The foam wedge 34 is configured to prevent rain from being driven between the join whilst also allowing water vapour to pass through the join and the wedge to prevent the buildup of moisture in the void created by the height of the battens.

Once the waterproofing element (F) is in position, an abutment feature 20, 120 as illustrated in any of Figures 7 to 1 1 is then selected.

The abutment feature 20, 120 has an elongate body portion 22, 122 configured to be located between an upper surface 9 of the planar member 10 of the waterproofing element (F), and lower surfaces 5 of overlaying roof materials; the curved internal profile of 20 at 202 having the same radius of curvature as the curved external profile of 10 at 101 a first engagement feature 24, 124 configured to engage a roof batten (T), and a second engagement feature 26, 126 configured to be received within and to engage an opening 28 provided in a lower surface of an overlaying roof material 4.

The roof material, for example stone, can be cut using for example circular diamond coating cutting wheels to provide a uniform slot in the underside of the covering 4 towards the rear trailing edge 6 of the covering 4. The second engagement feature 26, 126 of the abutment feature 20, 120 is shaped and dimensioned to be received within and to engage with this slot 28.

The abutment feature 20, 120 is positioned on top of the waterproofing element (F) at the rear trailing end 6 of the roof material 4 such that the first engagement feature 24, 124 abuts the outer surface 18 of the lip 12. The first engagement feature 24, 124, in some embodiments, is dimensioned to extend beyond the free end 14 of the lip 12 of the waterproofing element (F).

The first engagement feature 24, 124 of the abutment feature 20, 120 further provides a guide feature 30, 130 in the form of a portion of reduced thickness extending between the inner and outer surfaces thereof. The installer inserts a fixing member 32, 132, such as for example a screw, through the guide feature to engage the batten located behind the mounting element 20, 120.

The second engagement feature 26 may comprise a plurality of protrusions 23 (for example ribs) extending outwardly from the axis defined by the second engagement feature 26, as shown in Figures 7 and 8. The free end of the second engagement feature 126 may provide a hooked portion, as shown in Figures 9 and 10. The hooked portion may extend at any angle from the axis defined by the second engagement feature, for example extending at about 120°. In one embodiment, as illustrated in Figure 1 1 , the abutment feature 120 may further comprise a mounting portion 150 comprising a mounting body portion 152 configured to be mounted on the second engagement feature (in the form of an upstanding portion). The mounting portion 150 comprises a plurality of spaced apart protrusions 154 in the form of ribs extending outwardly away from an axis defined by the mounting body portion 152 and the axis defined by the second engagement feature 226.

The outwardly extending protrusions are resiliently deformable and help improve the grip between the opening or slot of the roof material located and the second engagement feature 26, 126, 226 in order to provide a more secure roof covering.

As illustrated in Figures 7 and 8, the inner surface of the first engagement feature 24 comprises a plurality of spaced apart protrusions 34 in the form of ribs extending outwardly from the axis defined by the first engagement feature 24. The protrusions 34 extend substantially parallel to each other and in a direction extending towards the elongate body 22 of the abutment feature 20. In use, these protrusions about the trailing rear edge of an adjacent roof material providing improved grip to help retain the mounting system 1 and overlaying roof materials in position on the structure.

The abutment feature 20 of Figures 7 and 8 has axially aligned first and second engagement features 24, 26 resulting in the element 20 having a substantially cross- shaped transverse cross-section. In contrast, the abutment feature 120 of Figures 9 and 10 has a substantially Z-shaped transverse cross-section.

With reference to Figures 9 and 10, the first engagement feature 124 is located at or adjacent a first side portion 140 of the elongate body portion 122 of the abutment feature 120. The second engagement feature 126 is located at or adjacent a second opposed side portion 142 of the elongate body portion 122 of the abutment feature 120.

It is to be understood that the configuration of the abutment feature 20, 120 may be selected depending on the particular requirements for the roof covering and underlying roof structure.

In some embodiments where thin roof materials are used, such as for example slate, the waterproofing element (F) of the present invention may be used in combination with a slate hook 300 rather than the locating and waterproofing device as described herein and as shown in Figure 13.

Once the roof mounting system 1 has been installed along the roof materials of the first course, the second course of roof materials are positioned along the upper surface 9 of the waterproofing element and the elongate body 22 of the abutment feature 20, 120. The second engagement feature 26, 126 is received within the corresponding slot 28 of the roof material 4 by pressing.

The process is then continued for a third and subsequent courses until the roof covering is complete as shown in Figure 12. When the installation of the stone reaches the apex of the roof then this upper section must be capped. Traditionally this is done with the uses of a stone ridge cap that is set in place using cement mortar. Modern construction methods require that apex of the roof is ventilated and therefore the use of a specialist ridge vent system is required.

So that the ridge is adequately ventilated a vent can be joined to the stone utilising a standard slot in the stone that having the same mounting method of 26 and 23 with the embodiment incorporating a vented strip that is used to remove the moist air that accumulates in the void below the GRP and above the membrane Figures 12, 16, 17.

The roof mounting system of the present invention therefore enables a roof covering to be provided in a single lap format thereby saving materials, time, labour and reducing the overall weight of the resultant roof covering whilst also improving the waterproofing properties of the roof covering.

The roof mounting system of the present invention prevents the ingress of water through the perp join provided between adjacent roof materials by the use of the waterproofing element (F) and as a result the roof covering does not require the use of a double lap format (DL).

The roof mounting system 1 of the present invention can be applied to various roof geometries as discussed below:

When two planes of a roof meet at an internal junction, a valley is formed, and it is necessary to form a waterproof join between the adjacent roof materials. In order to ensure that the traditional appearance of the roof is maintained, the waterproof element (F) is joined onto a waterproof under valley (V) (as shown in Figure 14) that is not visible and yet ensures that the water cannot enter the roof through the cut mitre (BV) in the stone valley join. So that the installer might ensure a straight join when installing this invisible junction on the roof, the valley incorporates a centre line (VC) that provides an accurate location for the cut and also acts to stop debris that might permeate through the open joint in the mitre from entering onto the water channels (VW) so as to ensure that the rain water might flow uninhibited down the valley.

By the design of the valley any excessive rain water flows down the upper surface of the mitre and does not have the chance to enter the valley through the gap in the stone mitred. The water channels (VW) have additional water stops (VS, VL) that further prevent the water in the valley from tracking into the roof. The valley also has a flat section that allows battens (T) and front plate to overlap the valley and ensure that water cannot enter through the valley.

When a roof abuts a wall then there must be a specific join made (Figure 15). The method of abutment is called a soaker (U), normally these soakers are from metals such as lead. Because the front plate is from GRP then metal cannot be used so a GRP soaker must therefore be used. These soakers incorporate an adhesive strip (US) to enable the weatherproof joining of the soaker onto the front plate. The soakers are bent perpendicular by way of an elongated ‘S’ and by this required shape the soaker can accommodate the lower sharp corner of the stone and return to close the gap at the top edge. The soakers are cut specifically to fit the specific size of each piece of stone.

It is appreciated that variation to the aforementioned embodiments may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined by the claims.