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Title:
SULFONAMIDOMETHYL PHOSPHONATE INHIBITORS OF $g(b)-LACTAMASE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2001/002411
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The intention relates to bacterial antibiotic resistance and, in particular, to compositions and methods for overcoming bacterial antibiotic resistance. The invention provides novel $g(b)-lactamase inhibitors, which are structurally unrelated to the natural product and semi-synthetic $g(b)-lactamase inhibitors presently available, and which do not require a $g(b)-lactam pharmacophore. The invention also provides pharmaceutical compositions and methods for inhibiting bacterial growth.

Inventors:
BESTERMAN JEFFREY M (CA)
DELORME DANIEL (CA)
RAHIL JUBRAIL (CA)
Application Number:
PCT/US2000/018344
Publication Date:
January 11, 2001
Filing Date:
July 05, 2000
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
METHYLGENE INC (CA)
BESTERMAN JEFFREY M (CA)
DELORME DANIEL (CA)
RAHIL JUBRAIL (CA)
International Classes:
A61K45/00; A61K31/662; A61K31/664; A61P31/00; A61P31/04; A61P43/00; C07F9/24; C07F9/38; C07F9/40; C07F9/42; C07F9/44; C07F9/572; C07F9/58; C07F9/60; C07F9/6503; C07F9/6506; C07F9/653; C07F9/6539; C07F9/6541; C07F9/655; C07F9/6553; (IPC1-7): C07F9/40; C07F9/42; C07F9/38; C07F9/44; C07F9/24; A61K31/66; A61P31/00; C07F9/58; C07F9/60; C07F9/6553; C07F9/655; C07F9/6539; C07F9/572; C07F9/6541
Domestic Patent References:
WO1999033850A11999-07-08
WO2000004030A12000-01-27
Foreign References:
Other References:
DRYJANSKI M.: "Inactivation of the ente- robacter cloacae P99 beta-lactamase by a fluorescent phosphonate: direct detection of ligand binding at the second site", BIOCHEMISTRY., vol. 34, no. 11, 1995, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. EASTON, PA., US, pages 3569 - 3575, XP002148551, ISSN: 0006-2960
LI N ET AL: "Structure-activity studies of the inhibition of serine beta- lactamases by phosphonate monoesters", BIOORGANIC & MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY,GB,ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, vol. 5, no. 9, 1997, pages 1783 - 1788, XP002100230, ISSN: 0968-0896
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Klunder, Janice M. (60 State Street Boston, MA, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A compound of Formula (I) : or a prodrug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; n is 0,1, or 2; R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; R3 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, any of which groups may be optionally substituted; R4 is selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR7, and N (R7) 2; and Rs is selected from the group consisting of F, OR6, SR7, and N (R7) 2, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R at each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and R5 are not both F, and further provided that R'is not 5dimethylamino 1naphthyl when R2 and R3 are both H, R4 is OH, and R5 is 4nitrophenoxy.
2. The compound of claim 1, wherein R4 is OH.
3. The compound of claim 2, wherein R5 is OR.
4. The compound of claim 3, wherein R6 is aryl or heteroaryl.
5. The compound of claim 4, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group is substituted with one or more substituents independently selected from the group consisting of Cl, NO2, and F.
6. The compound of claim 4, wherein the heteroaryl group is pyridyl, quinolyl, or isoquinolyl, any of which may be optionally substituted.
7. The compound of claim 1, which is a salt.
8. The compound of claim 1, wherein R2 is H.
9. The compound of claim 1, wherein n is 2.
10. The compound of claim 1, wherein R'is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, thienyl, furyl, benzothienyl, dibenzofuryl, naphthyl, quinolyl, isoquinolyl, pyridyl, and biphenyl, any of which groups may be optionally substituted.
11. The compound of claim 1, wherein R3 is selected from the group consisting of H, C, 6alkyl, (C6, 0) ar (C, 6) alkyl, and C6ioaryl, any of which may be optionally substituted.
12. The compound of claim 1, having a log P value that is <0. 6 or 2 O.
13. A compound of Formula (1): or a prodrug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein Rl is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; n is 0, 1, or 2; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl, wherein the aryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; R3 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; R is oR8, where R8 is selected from the group consisting of phenyl substituted with at least one chloro, nitro, or fluoro substituent; heteroaryl; and substituted heteroaryl; and R5 is OR6, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of H, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted.
14. The compound of claim 13, which is a salt.
15. The compound of claim 13, wherein R2 is H.
16. The compound of claim 13, wherein n is 2.
17. The compound of claim 13, wherein Rl is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, thienyl, furyl, benzothienyl, dibenzofuryl, naphthyl, quinolyl, isoquinolyl, pyridyl, and biphenyl, any of which groups may be optionally substituted.
18. The compound of claim 13, wherein R3 is selected from the group consisting of H, C, 6alkyl, (C6, 0) ar (C,6) alkyl, and C6, 0aryl, any of which may be optionally substituted.
19. A compound of Formula (In: or a prodrug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; n is 0,1, or 2; YisO, NR7, orS; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; R4 and R5 are independently selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR', N (R) 2, and OR, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R at each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and R5 are not both F or both OH.
20. The compound of claim 19, wherein Y is NR.
21. The compound of claim 20, wherein Y is NH.
22. A pharmaceutical composition comprising a compound of any one of claims 1,13, or 19, and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or diluent.
23. The pharmaceutical composition according to claim 22, further comprising an antibiotic agent.
24. A method for inhibiting bacterial growth, such method comprising administering a compound of any one of claims 1,13, or 19.
25. The method according to claim 24, further comprising the step of administering an antibiotic agent.
26. The method according to claim 25, wherein the antibiotic agent is a Plactam antibiotic.
Description:
SULFONAMIDOMETHYL PHOSPHONATE INHIBITORS OF BETA-LACTAMASE

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention The invention relates to bacterial antibiotic resistance. More particularly, the invention relates to compositions and methods for overcoming bacterial antibiotic resistance.

Brief Summary of the Related Art Bacterial antibiotic resistance has become one of the most important threats to modern health care. Cohen, Science 257: 1051-1055 (1992) discloses that infections caused by resistant bacteria frequently result in longer hospital stays, higher mortality and increased cost of treatment. Neu, Science 257: 1064-1073 (1992) discloses that the need for new antibiotics will continue to escalate because bacteria have a remarkable ability to develop resistance to new agents rendering them quickly ineffective.

The present crisis has prompted various efforts to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for bacterial resistance. Coulton et al., Progress in Medicinal Chemistry 31: 297- 349 (1994) teaches that the widespread use of penicillins and cephalosporins has resulted in the emergence of P-lactamases, a family of bacterial enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the P-lactam ring common to numerous presently used antibiotics. More recently, Dudley, Pharmacotherapy 15: 9S-14S (1995) has disclosed that resistance mediated by p-lactamases is a critical aspect at the core of the development of bacterial antibiotic resistance.

Attempts to address this problem through the development of P-lactamase inhibitors have had limited success. Sutherland, Trends Pharmacol. Sci. 12: 227-232 (1991) discusses the development of the first clinically useful P-lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid, which is a metabolite of Streptomyces clavuligerus. Coulton et al (supra) discloses two semi-synthetic inhibitors, sulbactam and tazobactam, presently available. Coulton et al. (supra) also teaches that in combination with ß-lactamase-susceptible antibiotics, p-lactamase inhibitors prevent antibiotic inactivation by P-lactamase enzymes, thereby producing a synergistic effect against p-lactamase producing bacteria.

Li et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 5 (9): 1783-1788 (1997), discloses that (3-lactamase enzymes are inhibited by phosphonate monoesters. Li et al. teaches that better inhibitory activity is achieved by compounds with amido side-chains, but that such compounds suffer the disadvantage of hydrolytic instability. Li et al. discloses that benzylsulfonamidomethyl phosphonate monoesters exhibit better hydrolytic stability, but also significantly weaker potency against P-lactamase enzymes, than do the corresponding benzylamidomethyl phosphonate monoesters. Dryjanski and Pratt, Biochemistry 34: 3569-3575 (1995) teaches thatp-nitrophenyl [(dansylamido) methyl] phosphonate irreversibly inactivates the P99 P- lactamase enzyme, and describes its use as a mechanistic probe for studying the interaction of ligands with a second binding site of the enzyme.

The availability of only a few p-lactamase inhibitors, however, is insufficient to counter the constantly increasing diversity of P-lactamases, for which a variety of novel and distinct inhibitors has become a necessity. There is, therefore, a need for the ability to identify new P-lactamase inhibitors. The development of fully synthetic inhibitors would greatly facilitate meeting this need.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention provides novel p-lactamase inhibitors, which are structurally unrelated to the natural product and semi-synthetic p-lactamase inhibitors presently available, and which do not require a P-lactam pharmacophore.

In a first aspect, therefore, the invention provides novel p-lactamase inhibitors. In one embodiment of the invention, the novel P-lactamase inhibitor is a compound of Formula (1):

or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein Rl is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; nis0, l, or2; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl;

R3 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, any of which groups may be optionally substituted; R4 is selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR7, and N (R7) 2; and R5 is selected from the group consisting of F, OR, SR, and N (R) 2, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R7 at each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and R are not both F, and further provided that R1 is not 5-dimethylamino- 1-naphthyl when R2 and R3 are both H, R4 is OH, and R5 is 4-nitrophenoxy.

In another embodiment, the novel P-lactamase inhibitor is a compound of Formula or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; nis0, l, or2; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl, wherein the aryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; R3 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; R4 OR, where R is selected from the group consisting of phenyl substituted with at least one chloro, nitro, or fluoro substituent; heteroaryl; and

substituted heteroaryl; and R is OR, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of H, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted.

In yet another embodiment, the novel p-lactamase inhibitor is a compound of Formula (Il): or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> n is 0, 1, or 2;<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> Y is 0, NR, or S; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; R4 and R are independently selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR, N (R7) 2, OR, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R7 at each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and Rus are not both F or both OH.

In a second aspect, the invention provides pharmaceutical compositions comprising a compound of Formula (I) or Formula (II), or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or diluent.

In a third aspect, the invention provides methods for inhibiting bacterial growth, such methods comprising administering to a bacterial cell culture, or to a bacterially infected cell culture, tissue, or organism, a (3-lactamase inhibitor of Formula (I) or Formula (II).

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES Figure 1 is a graphical plot of the synergistic effect of P-lactamase inhibitors as a function of log P. Synergy is defined and methods for its determination are provided in the Examples.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The invention relates to bacterial antibiotic resistance. More particularly, the invention relates to compositions and methods for overcoming bacterial antibiotic resistance.

The patents and publications identified in this specification indicate the knowledge in this field and are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety. In the case of inconsistencies, the present disclosure will prevail.

The invention provides novel p-lactamase inhibitors, which are structurally unrelated to the natural product and semi-synthetic P-lactamase inhibitors presently available, and which do not require a p-lactam pharmacophore. Certain embodiments of these new inhibitors may also bind bacterial DD-peptidases, and thus may potentially act both as ß- lactamase inhibitors and as antibiotic agents.

Li et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 5 (9): 1783-1788 (1997), and Dryjanski and Pratt, Biochemistry 34: 3569-3575 (1995), teach that P-lactamase enzymes are inactivated by 4- nitrophenyl N- (phenylmethylsulfonyl) aminomethylphosphonate and p-nitro-phenyl [(dansylamido) methyl] phosphonate, respectively. Despite the enzyme inhibitory activity of these compounds, however, neither compound is effective in producing a synergistic effect when co-administered with an antibiotic agent to a bacterially infected cell culture (see Table 1, compounds 1 and 72). By contrast, the present inventors have surprisingly discovered that aryl-and (heteroaryl)-sulfonamidomethylphosphonate monoesters both inhibit enzymatic activity in vitro and enhance the potency of antibiotic agents in cell culture.

For purposes of the present invention, the following definitions will be used: As used herein, the term"P-lactamase inhibitor"is used to identify a compound having a structure as defined herein, which is capable of inhibiting P-lactamase activity.

Inhibiting p-lactamase activity means inhibiting the activity of a class A, B, C, or D - lactamase. Preferably, for antimicrobial applications such inhibition should be at a 50% inhibitory concentration below 100 micrograms/mL, more preferably below 30 micrograms/mL and most preferably below 10 micrograms/mL. The terms"class A","class B","class C", and"class D"ß-lactamases are understood by those skilled in the art and can be found described in Waley, The Chemistry of ß-Lactamase, Page Ed., Chapman & Hall, London, (1992) 198-228.

In some embodiments of the invention, the p-lactamase inhibitor may also be capable of acting as an antibiotic agent by inhibiting bacterial cell-wall cross-linking enzymes. Thus, the term p-lactamase inhibitor is intended to encompass such dual-acting inhibitors. In certain preferred embodiments, the p-lactamase inhibitor may be capable of inhibiting D- alanyl-D-alanine-carboxypeptidases/transpeptidases (hereinafter DD-peptidases). The term "DD-peptidase"is used in its usual sense to denote penicillin-binding proteins involved in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis (see, e. g., Ghysen, Prospect. Biotechnol. 128: 67-95 (1987)).

In certain particularly preferred embodiments, the D-alanyl-D-alanine- carboxypeptidase/transpeptidase, which may be inhibited is the Streptomyces R61 DD- peptidase. This enzyme has conservation of active site mechanism with bacterial signal peptidases (see, e. g., Black et al., Current Pharmaceutical Design 4: 133-154 (1998); Dalbey et al., Protein Science 6: 1129-1138 (1997)). It is, therefore, possible that the p-lactamase inhibitors of the invention may also be capable of inhibition of bacterial signal peptidases.

As used herein, the term"ß-lactamase"denotes a protein capable of inactivating a ß- lactam antibiotic. In one preferred embodiment, the p-lactamase is an enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of the p-lactam ring of a p-lactam antibiotic. In certain preferred embodiments, the p-lactamase is microbial. In certain other preferred embodiments, the p- lactamase is a serine p-lactamase. Examples of such preferred p-lactamases are well known and are disclosed in, e. g., Waley, The Chemistry of ß-Lactamase, Page Ed., Chapman & Hall, London, (1992) 198-228. In particularly preferred embodiments, the p-lactamase is a class C p-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae P99 (hereinafter P99 p-lactamase), or a class A ß- lactamase of the TEM-2 plasmid (hereinafter TEM p-lactamase).

As used herein, the term"organism"refers to any multicellular organism. Preferably, the organism is an animal, more preferably a mammal, and most preferably a human.

The term"alkyl"as employed herein refers to straight and branched chain aliphatic groups having from 1 to 12 carbon atoms, preferably l-8 carbon atoms, more preferably 1-6 carbon atoms, which may be optionally substituted with one, two or three substituents.

Unless otherwise specified, the alkyl group may be saturated, unsaturated, or partially unsaturated. As used herein, therefore, the term"alkyl"is specifically intended to include alkenyl and alkynyl groups, as well as saturated alkyl groups. Preferred alkyl groups include, without limitation, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, tert-butyl, isobutyl, pentyl, hexyl, vinyl, allyl, isobutenyl, ethynyl, and propynyl.

As employed herein, a"substituted"alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, or heterocyclic group is one having between one and about four, preferably between one and about three, more preferably one or two, non-hydrogen substituents. Suitable substituents include, without limitation, halo, hydroxy, nitro, haloalkyl, alkyl, alkaryl, aryl, aralkyl, alkoxy, aryloxy, amino, acylamino, alkylcarbamoyl, arylcarbamoyl, aminoalkyl, alkoxycarbonyl, carboxy, hydroxyalkyl, alkanesulfonyl, arenesulfonyl, alkanesulfonamido, arenesulfonamido, aralkylsulfonamido, alkylcarbonyl, acyloxy, cyano, and ureido groups.

The term"cycloalkyl"as employed herein includes saturated and partially unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbon groups having 3 to 12, preferably 3 to 8 carbons, wherein the cycloalkyl group additionally may be optionally substituted. Preferred cycloalkyl groups include, without limitation, cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, cyclopentenyl, cyclohexyl, cyclohexenyl, cycloheptyl, and cyclooctyl.

An"aryl"group is a C6-CI4 aromatic moiety comprising one to three aromatic rings, which may be optionally substituted. Preferably, the aryl group is a C6-CI0 aryl group.

Preferred aryl groups include, without limitation, phenyl, naphthyl, anthracenyl, and fluorenyl. An"aralkyl"or"arylalkyl"group comprises an aryl group covalently linked to an alkyl group, either of which may independently be optionally substituted or unsubstituted.

Preferably, the aralkyl group is C,. 6alk (C6-lo) aryl, including, without limitation, benzyl, phenethyl, and naphthylmethyl. An"alkaryl"or"alkylaryl"group is an aryl group having one or more alkyl substituents. Examples of alkaryl groups include, without limitation, tolyl, xylyl, mesityl, ethylphenyl, tert-butylphenyl, and methylnaphthyl.

A"heterocyclic"group is a ring structure having from about 3 to about 8 atoms, wherein one or more atoms are selected from the group consisting of N, O, and S. The heterocyclic group may be optionally substituted on carbon with oxo or with one of the

substituents listed above. The heterocyclic group may also independently be substituted on nitrogen with alkyl, aryl, aralkyl, alkylcarbonyl, alkylsulfonyl, arylcarbonyl, arylsulfonyl, alkoxycarbonyl, aralkoxycarbonyl, or on sulfur with oxo or lower alkyl. Preferred heterocyclic groups include, without limitation, epoxy, aziridinyl, tetrahydrofuranyl, pyrrolidinyl, piperidinyl, piperazinyl, thiazolidinyl, oxazolidinyl, oxazolidinonyl, and morpholino.

In certain preferred embodiments, the heterocyclic group is a heteroaryl group. As used herein, the term"heteroaryl"refers to groups having 5 to 14 ring atoms, preferably 5,6, 9, or 10 ring atoms; having 6,10, or 14 n electrons shared in a cyclic array; and having, in addition to carbon atoms, between one and about three heteroatoms selected from the group consisting of N, O, and S. Preferred heteroaryl groups include, without limitation, thienyl, benzothienyl, furyl, benzofuryl, dibenzofuryl, pyrrolyl, imidazolyl, pyrazolyl, pyridyl, pyrazinyl, pyrimidinyl, indolyl, quinolyl, isoquinolyl, quinoxalinyl, tetrazolyl, oxazolyl, thiazolyl, and isoxazolyl.

In certain other preferred embodiments, the heterocyclic group is fused to an aryl or heteroaryl group. Examples of such fused heterocyles include, without limitation, tetrahydroquinoline and dihydrobenzofuran.

The term"halogen"or"halo"as employed herein refers to chlorine, bromine, fluorine, or iodine.

As herein employed, the term"acyl"refers to an alkylcarbonyl or arylcarbonyl substituent.

The term"acylamino"refers to an amide group attached at the nitrogen atom. The term"carbamoyl"refers to an amide group attached at the carbonyl carbon atom. The nitrogen atom of an acylamino or carbamoyl substituent may be additionally substituted.

The term"sulfonamido"refers to a sulfonamide substituent attached by either the sulfur or the nitrogen atom. The term"amino"is meant to include NH2, alkylamino, arylamino, and cyclic amino groups.

The term"ureido"as employed herein refers to a substituted or unsubstituted urea moiety.

Compounds In a first aspect, the invention provides novel P-lactamase inhibitors. In one embodiment of the invention, the novel p-lactamase inhibitor is a compound of Formula (1):

or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; n is 0,1, or 2; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; R 3 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, any of which groups may be optionally substituted; is selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR7, and N (R7) 2; and R5 is selected from the group consisting of F, OR, SR, and N (R) 2, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R7 at each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and R5 are not both F, and further provided that Rl is not 5-dimethylamino- 1-naphthyl when R and R3 are both H, R4 is OH, and R5 is 4-nitrophenoxy.

In another embodiment, the novel P-lactamase inhibitor is a compound of Formula (1):

or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; n is 0,1, or 2; R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl, wherein the aryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; Ri is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; R4 is OR, where R is selected from the group consisting of phenyl substituted with at least one chloro, nitro, or fluoro substituent; heteroaryl; and substituted heteroaryl; and R5 is OR, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of H, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted.

In yet another embodiment, the novel P-lactamase inhibitor is a compound of Formula (7/): or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; n is 0,1, or 2; Y is O, NR, or S; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl,

aralkyl, and aryl; R4and R are independently selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR7, N (R7) 2, and OR, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R7 at each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and R5 are not both F or both OH.

With respect to the compounds of Formula (I) or Formula (II), the following preferred values are applicable: In certain preferred embodiments, R1 is C6 4aryl, more preferably C6-10aryl, most preferably phenyl or naphthyl, any of which may be substituted. In certain other preferred embodiments, R'is heteroaryl or substituted heteroaryl. Preferably, the heteroaryl group is selected from the group consisting of thienyl, benzothienyl, furyl, benzofuryl, quinolyl, isoquinolyl, and thiazolyl. In certain particularly preferred embodiments, the heteroaryl group is thienyl or benzothienyl Substituted aryl or heteroaryl groups have one or more, preferably between one and about three, more preferably one or two substituents, which are preferably selected from the group consisting of C, 6alkyl, preferably Cl4alkyl; halo, preferably Cl, Br, or F; haloalkyl, preferably (halo) _5 (C1-6) alkyl, more preferably (halo) i. (C, _ 3) alkyl, and most preferably CF3; Cl 6alkoxy, preferably methoxy, ethoxy, or benzyloxy; C6-10aryloxy, preferably phenoxy; C 6alkoxycarbonyl, preferably CI 3alkoxycarbonyl, most preferably carbomethoxy or carboethoxy; C6-10aryl, preferably phenyl; (C6-10) ar (C, 6) alkyl, preferably (C6-10) ar (CI-3) alkyl, more preferably benzyl, naphthylmethyl or phenethyl; hydroxy (CI-6) alkyl, preferably hydroxy (C, 3) alkyl, more preferably hydroxymethyl; amino (C,-6) alkyl, preferably amino (C1- 3) alkyl, more preferably aminomethyl; (C1-6)alkylamino, preferably methylamino, ethylamino, or propylamino; di- (Cf-6) alkylamino, preferably dimethylamino or diethylamino; (Ci-6) alkylcarbamoyl, preferably methylcarbamoyl, dimethylcarbamoyl, or benzylcarbamoyl; (C6-10)arylcarbamoyl, preferably phenylcarbamoyl; (C,-6) alkaneacylamino, preferably acetylamino; (C6-lo) areneacylamino, preferably benzoylamino; (C1-6) alkanesulfonyl,

preferably methanesulfonyl; (Cl 6) alkanesulfonamido, preferably methanesulfonamido; (C6-, o) arenesulfonyl, preferably benzenesulfonyl or toluenesulfonyl; (C6-10)arenesulfonamido, preferably benzenesulfonyl or toluenesulfonyl; (C6-io) ar (C1-6) alkylsulfonamido, preferably benzylsulfonamido; C1-6-alkylcarobnyl, preferably C, _3alkylcarbonyl, more preferably acetyl; (Cl 6) acyloxy, preferably acetoxy; cyano; amino; carboxy; hydroxy; ureido; and nitro.

Preferably, n is 1 or 2. More preferably n is 2.

R is preferably selected from the group consisting of H; C1-8alkyl, preferably Cl 6alkyl, more preferably Cl4alkyl; C3-8cycloalkyl, preferably cyclopropyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl; (C6-10) ar (CI-6) alkyl, preferably (C6-10) ar (CI-3) alkyl, more preferably benzyl; and C610aryl, preferably phenyl; any of which groups may be optionally substituted. More preferably, R2 is one of H, methyl, ethyl, propyl, cyclopropyl or benzyl. Most preferably, R2 is H.

R is preferably selected from the group consisting of H; C1-8alkyl, preferably Cl 6alkyl, more preferably C1-4alkyl; C3-8cycloalkyl, preferably cyclopropyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl; (C6-1o) ar (Ci-6) alkyl, preferably (C6-lo) ar (C1-3)alkyl, more preferably benzyl; heterocyclic having one or more, preferably between one and about three, more preferably one or two, ring atoms independently selected from the group consisting of N,O, and S; heterocyclic (C,-6) alkyl, preferably heterocyclic (Cl- 3) alkyl; and C6, 0aryl, preferably phenyl; any of which groups may be optionally substituted. More preferably, R3 is one of H, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, isobutyl, butyl, phenyl, or benzyl.

In certain other preferred embodiments, R2 and R are taken together with the carbon and nitrogen atoms to which they are attached to form a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic ring. Preferably, the heterocyclic ring is a 4-to 7-membered ring, more preferably a 5-or 6- membered ring.

In certain preferred embodiments, R4 is preferably OH. In certain other preferred embodiments, R4 is preferably OR8, wherein R8 is preferably selected from the group consisting of phenyl or heteroaryl, either of which may be optionally substituted. Where R8 is phenyl, the phenyl group is preferably substituted with at least one ester, amide, chloro, nitro, or fluoro substituent; more preferably with at least one chloro, nitro, or fluoro substituent; and most preferably with at least one nitro substituent.

R is preferably selected from the group consisting of F, OR6, SR', and N (R7)2, where R6 and R7 are as defined below. More preferably, R is F or OR. In certain particularly

preferred embodiments, R is a good leaving group. Leaving group ability is understood by those skilled in the art, and is generally described in March, Advanced Organic Chemistry, Third Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 1985, pp 310-316. Compounds according to this embodiment of the invention are subject to attack by a nucleophilic residue such as serine on the enzyme, resulting in irreversible inactivation of the enzyme.

R6 is preferably selected from the group consisting of C, 8alkyl, preferably CI-6alkyl, more preferably C1-4alkyl ; C3-8cycloalkyl, preferably cyclopropyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl; (C6-io) ar (CI-6) alkyl, preferably (C6-io) ar (Ci-3) alkyl, more preferably benzyl; heterocyclic having one or more, preferably between one and about three, more preferably one or two, ring atoms independently selected from the group consisting of N, O, and S; heterocyclic (C1- 6) alkyl, preferably heterocyclic (CI-3) alkyl; and C6 l0aryl, preferably phenyl; any of which groups may be optionally substituted. Preferably, the heterocyclic group is heteroaryl.

More preferably, R6 is C6, 0aryl or heteroaryl, either of which may be optionally substituted with between one and about three, more preferably one or two substituents, which are preferably selected from the group consisting of C, 6alkyl, preferably C1-4alkyl ; halo, preferably Cl, Br, or F; haloalkyl, preferably (halo) 5 (Cl 6) alkyl, more preferably (halo) 1-5(C1- 3) alkyl, and most preferably CF3; Cl 6alkoxy, preferably methoxy, ethoxy, or benzyloxy; C6- loaryloxy, preferably phenoxy; C1-6alkoxycarbonyl, preferably Cl 3alkoxycarbonyl, most preferably carbomethoxy or carboethoxy; C6-loaryl, preferably phenyl; (C6-lo) ar (Cl 6) alkyl, preferably (C6-10) ar (CI-3) alkyl, more preferably benzyl, naphthylmethyl or phenethyl; hydroxy (C1-6) alkyl, preferably hydroxy (CI-3) alkyl, more preferably hydroxymethyl; amino (C1-6) alkyl, preferably amino (C1-3)alkyl, more preferably aminomethyl; (C1.

6) alkanesulfonyl, preferably methanesulfonyl; (Ci-6) alkanesulfonamido, preferably methanesulfonamido; (C6-10) arenesulfonyl, preferably benzenesulfonyl or toluenesulfonyl; (C6-io) arenesulfonamido, preferably benzenesulfonyl or toluenesulfonyl; (C6, 0) ar (C1.

6) alkylsulfonamido, preferably benzylsulfonamido; C1-6alkylcawrboamoyl, preferably methylcarbamoyl, dimethylcarbamoyl, or benzylcarbamoyl; C6-loarylcarbamoyl, preferably benzylcarbamoyl; (Ci-6) alkane-acylamino, preferably acetylamino; (C6-10) areneacylamino, preferably benzyolamino; C1-6alkylcarbonyl, preferably C, 3alkylcarbonyl, more preferably acetyl; cyano; amino; carboxy; hydroxy; and nitro.

Most preferably, R6 is an aryl or heteroaryl group substituted with one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, preferably chloro or fluoro; haloalkyl, preferably trifluoromethyl; nitro; cyano; acyl; carboxy; and alkoxycarbonyl. More

preferably, the aryl or heteroaryl group has one or more chloro, fluoro, or nitro substituents.

Most preferably, R6 is selected from the group consisting of nitrophenyl, pentafluorophenyl, trilluorophenyl, pyridyl, chloropyridyl, isoquinolyl, and quinolyl.

R is preferably selected from the group consisting of H; C, _8alkyl, preferably Cl- 6alkyl, more preferably C, 4alkyl; C38cycloalkyl, preferably cyclopropyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl; (C6, 0) ar (C, 6) alkyl, preferably (C6, 0) ar (C1-30 alkyl, more preferably benzyl; and C6, 0aryl, preferably phenyl; any of which groups may be optionally substituted.

With respect to the compounds of Formula (II), Y is O, NR, or S. Preferably, Y is NR, where R is as defined above. In certain particularly preferred embodiments, Y is NH.

The present inventors have discovered a correlation between hydrophilicity of ß- lactamase inhibitors (as measured by log P) and their biological efficacy (expressed as synergy as described in the Examples). The correlation (see Figure 1) is described by a V- shaped curve, with its point intercepting the x-axis at a log P value of about-0.4 and its arms extending from-. 4 to +0.6. Based on this observed trend in structure-activity relationships, the P-lactamase inhibitors of the invention preferably have high negative or high positive log P values. Preferably, the log P for the inhibitor is <-0.6 or 0, more preferably <-1 or 2 0.2, still more preferably <-1.2 or > 0.4, and mostpreferably <-1.4 or > 0.6. Nikaido and Vaara, Microbiological Reviews 49,1-32 (1985), and Livermore, Scad. J. Infect. Dis., Suppl. 74,15- 22 (1991), teach that hydrophilicity and cell permeability govern the behavior of antimicrobial agents.

The compounds of Formula (I) are preferably monoacids (R4 = OH). In certain preferred embodiments, the P-lactamase inhibitor is a salt of the compound of Formula (1), the salt preferably being formed by treating the compound of Formula (o) with a base so as to remove the phosphonate hydrogen atom. Non-limiting examples of bases which may be used to deprotonate the compound of Formula (I) include sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, ammonium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, and potassium carbonate. Preferably, the counterion thereby introduced is a pharmaceutically acceptable counterion, including without limitation sodium, magnesium, calcium, or ammonium.

The compounds of Formula (/) wherein R 3= H can be prepared in certain preferred embodiments according to the general synthetic route depicted in Scheme 1. Thus, Arbusov reaction of bromomethylphthalimide with a phosphite such as triethylphosphite is preferably

conducted at elevated temperature, e. g., 145 °C, in a solvent such as xylenes to afford the phthalimidomethylphosphonate III. Treatment of III with a hydrazine such as methylhydrazine in an alcoholic solvent such as methanol effects phthalimide cleavage to afford the aminomethylphosphonate IV. Treatment of IV with a sulfonyl chloride, sulfinyl chloride, or sulfenyl chloride of the general formula V in an organic solvent such as methylene chloride, and in the presence of a base such as triethylamine, provides the N- sulfonyl-, N-sulfinyl-, or N-sulfenyl-aminomethylphosphonate VI. Treatment of VI with a silyl halide such as trimethylsilyl bromide at room temperature in a solvent such as methylene chloride effects cleavage of the phosphonate ester to provide the phosphonic acid VII. In situ activation of VII with trichloroacetonitrile in pyridine, followed by treatment at 100° C with an aryl or heteroaryl alcohol, such as phenol or substituted phenol, affords an aryl or heteroaryl phosphonate. Treatment with an aqueous base such as sodium bicarbonate then provides the sodium salt VIII, which correpsonds to the compound of Formula (I), wherein R2=H.R3 Scheme 1 In certain other preferred embodiments, (sulfonamido) methylphosphonates of formula XIV may be prepared according to the procedures illustrated in Scheme 2. Thus, the sulfonyl chloride of formula IX is treated with ammonium hydroxide to produce the corresponding sulfonamide of formula X. Treatment of X with paraformaldehyde in the presence of a phosphite such as trimethyl phosphite affords the phosphonate diester of formula XI.

Deprotection is effected by treatment of XI with a silyl halide such as trimethylsilyl bromide to produce XII, which may be converted to XIV by treatment with trichloroacetonitrile in pyridine, followed by treatment with an aryl or heteroaryl alcohol, as described above.

Alternatively, treatment of XII with a chlorinating agent such as sulfuryl chloride or thionyl chloride, followed by treatment with an aryl or heteroaryl alcohol, affords the diester XIII, which is mono-deprotected by treatment with base to afford VIII.

Scheme 2

Compounds of Formula (1), wherein R3 is not hydrogen, are synthesized according to the synthetic route depicted in Scheme 3. Thus, treatment of a sulfonamide X with an aldehyde in the presence of acetyl chloride and a phosphite such as diethylphosphite affords the a-substituted (sulfonamido) methylphosphonate ester XV. The remaining steps are performed analogously to those described for the methods according to Schemes 1 and 2 above to afford the salt XVII, which corresponds to the compound of Formula (I), wherein R3 is not hydrogen.

Scheme 3

The compounds of Formula (I), wherein R4 is F, are prepared according to the synthetic route outlined in Scheme 4. Thus, the phosphonic acid VII is treated with a chlorinating agent such as sulfuryl chloride or thionyl chloride to produce the dichlorophosphine oxide XIX, which, without isolation, is then treated with tetrabutylammonium fluoride. Treatment with base then affords the salt XX, which corresponds to the compound of Formula (I), wherein R4 is F.

Scheme 4 The compounds of Formula (I), wherein R2 is not hydrogen, may be prepared according to the synthetic route depicted in Scheme 5. Thus, the N-sulfonyl-, N-sulfinyl-, or N-sulfenyl-aminomethylphosphonate VI is treated with an alkyl halide in the presence of a base such as cesium carbonate to afford the N-alkylated derivative XXI. Deprotection and monoesterification as described above then provide the N, N-disubstituted compound XXIII.

Scheme 5

Pharmaceutical Contpositions In a second aspect, the invention provides pharmaceutical compositions comprising a P-lactamase inhibitor of the invention and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or diluent. In one embodiment of the invention, the pharmaceutical composition comprises a P-lactamase inhibitor of Formula (1):

or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; nis0, l, or2; R2 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, any of which groups may be optionally substituted;

R4 is selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR7, and N (R7) 2; and R is selected from the group consisting of F, OR, SR, and N (R) 2, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R7 al each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and R5 are not both F, and further provided that R'is not 5-dimethylamino-I-naphthyl when R2 and R3 are both H, R4 is OH, and R5 is 4-nitrophenoxy; and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or diluent.

In another embodiment, the pharmaceutical composition comprises a P-lactamase inhibitor of Formula (1): or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; n is 0,1, or 2; R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl, wherein the aryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; R3 is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, and (heteroaryl) alkyl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; R4 is OR, where Rg is selected from the group consisting of phenyl substituted with at least one chloro, nitro, or fluoro substituent; heteroaryl; and substituted heteroaryl; and

R5 is OR, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of H, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteraryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted; and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or diluent.

In yet another embodiment, the pharmaceutical composition comprises a P-lactamase inhibitor of Formula (II) : or a pro-drug or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R'is aryl or heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl group may be optionally substituted; <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> nis0, l, or2;<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> Y is O, NR7, or S; * is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; R4 and Rs are independently selected from the group consisting of OH, F, SR, N (R) 2, OR, where R6 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, (heteroaryl) alkyl, and heteroaryl, wherein the aryl or heteroaryl portion of any such group may be optionally substituted, and where R7 at each occurrence is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aralkyl, and aryl; provided that R4 and R5 are not both F or both OH; and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or diluent.

Preferred values for R'-R8 are as set forth above for the first aspect of the invention.

As employed herein, the term"pro-drug"refers to pharmacologically acceptable derivatives, e. g., esters and amides, such that the resulting biotransformation product of the derivative is

the active drug. Pro-drugs are known in the art and are described generally in, e. g., Goodman and Gilmans,"Biotransformation of Drugs", In The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th Ed., McGraw Hill, Int. Ed. 1992, p. 13-15, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Compounds of the invention may be formulated by any method well known in the art and may be prepared for administration by any route, including, without limitation, parenteral, oral, sublingual, transdermal, topical, intranasal, intratracheal, or intrarectal. In certain particularly preferred embodiments, compounds of the invention are administered intravenously in a hospital setting. In certain other embodiments, administration may be preferably by the oral route.

The characteristics of the carrier will depend on the route of administration. As used herein, the term"pharmaceutically acceptable"means a non-toxic material that does not interfere with the effectiveness of the biological activity of the active ingredient (s). The term "physiologically acceptable"refers to a non-toxic material that is compatible with a biological system such as a cell, cell culture, tissue, or organism. Thus, compositions and methods according to the invention, may contain, in addition to the inhibitor, diluents, filles, salts, buffers, stabilizers, solubilizers, and other materials well known in the art. The pharmaceutical composition of the invention may also contain other active factors and/or agents which enhance the inhibition of P-lactamases and/or DD-peptidases.

Inhibition of Bacterial Growth In a third aspect, the invention provides methods for inhibiting bacterial growth, such methods comprising administering to a bacterial cell culture, or to a bacterially infected cell culture, tissue, or organism, a P-lactamase inhibitor of Formula (I) or Formula (II) as defined for the first aspect of the invention.

Preferably, the bacteria to be inhibited by administration of a P-lactamase inhibitor of the invention are bacteria that are resistant to P-lactam antibiotics. More preferably, the bacteria to be inhibited are p-lactamase positive strains that are highly resistant to P-lactam antibiotics. The terms"resistant"and"highly resistant"are well-understood by those of ordinary skill in the art (see, e. g., Payne et al., Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 38: 767-772 (1994); Hanaki et al., Antimicrobial Agents and Cheemotherapy 30: 1120-1126 (1995)). Preferably,"highly resistant"bacterial strains are those against which the MIC of methicillin is > 100 pg/mL. Preferably,"slightly resistant"bacterial strains are those against which the MIC of methicillin is > 25 pg/mL.

The methods according to this aspect of the invention are useful for inhibiting bacterial growth in a variety of contexts. In certain preferred embodiments, the compound of the invention is administered to an experimental cell culture in vitro to prevent the growth of P-lactam resistant bacteria. In certain other preferred embodiments the compound of the invention is administered to an animal, including a human, to prevent the growth of P-lactam resistant bacteria in vivo. The method according to this embodiment of the invention comprises administering a therapeutically effective amount of a P-lactamase inhibitor according to the invention for a therapeutically effective period of time to an animal, including a human. Preferably, the p-lactamase inhibitor is administered in the form of a pharmaceutical composition according to the second aspect of the invention.

The terms"therapeutically effective amount"and"therapeutically effective period of time"are used to denote known treatments at dosages and for periods of time effective to show a meaningful patient benefit, i. e., healing of conditions associated with bacterial infection, and/or bacterial drug resistance. Preferably, such administration should be parenteral, oral, sublingual, transdermal, topical, intranasal, intratracheal, or intrarectal.

When administered systemically, the therapeutic composition is preferably administered at a sufficient dosage to attain a blood level of inhibitor of at least about 100 micrograms/mL, more preferably about 1 milligrams/mL, and still more preferably about 10 milligrams/mL.

For localized administration, much lower concentrations than this may be effective, and much higher concentrations may be tolerated.

In certain preferred embodiments of the method according to this aspect of the invention, a (3-lactamase inhibitor according to the invention is co-administered with an antibiotic. Preferably, such co-administration produces a synergistic effect. As employed herein, the terms"synergy"and"synergistic effect"indicate that the effect produced when two or more drugs are co-administered is greater than would be predicted based on the effect produced when the compounds are administered individually. While not wishing to be bound by theory, the present inventors believe that the P-lactamase inhibitors according to the invention act to prevent degradation of P-lactam antibiotics, thereby enhancing their efficacy and producing a synergistic effect. In particularly preferred embodiments of the invention, therefore, the co-administered antibiotic is a P-lactam antibiotic. For purposes of this invention, the term"co-administered"is used to denote simultaneous or sequential administration.

Synergy may be expressed as a ratio of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic tested in the absence of a P-lactamase inhibitor to the MIC of the same antibiotic tested in the presence of the P-lactamase inhibitor. A ratio of one (1) indicates that the P-lactamase inhibitor has no effect on antibiotic potency. A ratio greater than one (1) indicates that the P-lactamase inhibitor produces a synergistic effect when co-administered with the antibiotic agent. Preferably the P-lactamase inhibitor produces a synergy ratio of at least about 2, more preferably about 4, and still more preferably about 8. Most preferably, the P-lactamase inhibitor produces a synergy ratio of at least about 16.

In certain other preferred embodiments, the (3-lactamase inhibitor according to the invention may itself have antibiotic activity, and thus potentially can be administered alone or can be co-administered with a P-lactam antibiotic or any other type of antibiotic.

The term"antibiotic"is used herein to describe a compound or composition which decreases the viability of a microorganism, or which inhibits the growth or reproduction of a microorganism."Inhibits the growth or reproduction"means increasing the generation cycle time by at least 2-fold, preferably at least 10-fold, more preferably at least 100-fold, and most preferably indefinitely, as in total cell death. As used in this disclosure, an antibiotic is further intended to include an antimicrobial, bacteriostatic, or bactericidal agent. Non- limiting examples of antibiotics useful according to this aspect of the invention include penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, sulfonamides, macrolides, tetracyclins, lincosides, quinolones, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, metronidazole, rifampin, isoniazid, spectinomycin, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and others. The term" (3-lactam antibiotic" is used to designate compounds with antibiotic properties containing a p-lactam functionality.

Non-limiting examples of p-lactam antibiotics useful according to this aspect of the invention include penicillins, cephalosporins, penems, carbapenems, and monobactams.

The following examples are intended to further illustrate certain preferred embodiments of the invention, and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.

Example 1: [(4-fluorobenzensulfonylamino)methyl]-phenosphonic acid mono-(2- chloropyridin-3-yl) ester sodiuni salt. (30) 0 0 (Me0) 3P I \ N NH H2N/POMe --\ xylene MEOH ll'-OMe O O ° Meg OMe CI souci SOzC! NMM, CH2CI2 ' F (0) 2 (0) 2 H Me3SiBr bl--, 1-11 OMe N H OH CH2CI2 H rome k 0 p 0 (fiv) 35 35 1. CC13CN, pyridine 2. NaHCO3 HO N (0) 2 ci N 0 + Nu r 30

Step 1. dimethy (phthalimidomethyl) phosphonate (ii).

A mixture of N- (bromomethyl) phthalimide (i) (10.43 g, 43.46 mmol) and trimethyl phosphite (5.93 g, 47.80 mmol) was heated at reflux in xylene (20 mL) for 6 h. The reaction mixture was then cooled to room temperature and concentrated. Crystallization from CHCl3_hexane gave (ii) (7.60 g, 65%) as a white solid:'H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) 8ut 3.84 (d, JH, p = 10.8 Hz, 6 H), 4.12 (d, J = 11.4 Hz, 2 h), 7.76 (m, 2 H), 7.87 (m, 2 H).

Step 2. [( (4-fluorobenzensulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphonic acid dimethyl ester (35).

A solution of phthalimide (ii) (1.50 g, 5.66 mmol) in anhydrous CH30H (15mL) was treated with hydrazide monohydrate (0.29 mL, 6.0mmol) and stirred at room temperature for 3.5 days. The white phthalyl hydrazide precipitate was filtered off and the filtrate was concentrated at temperature below 20 °C to give dimethyl aminomethyl phosphonate (iii) as a pale yellow oil. Without purification, compound (iii) was dissolved in CH2C12 (20 mL), cooled to 0 °C, and treated with N-methylmorpholine (0.84 mL, 7.36 mmol) and p- fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride (1.43 g, 7.36 mmol). The mixture was warmed to room temperature over 2 hours, and stirred for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was then diluted with CH2C12, (50 mL) washed with 1 N HC1 (2 x 25mL), dried (MgS04), filtered, and concentrated. Purification by flash chromotography (silica gel; elution with 4% CH30H in EtOAc) gave 35 (0.58 g, 35%) as a white solid:'H NMR (300 MHz, CDC13) AH 3.29 (d, J= 13.2 Hz 2 H), Hz, 6 H), 6.50 (br s, 1 H), 7.20 (m, 2 H), 7.90 (m, 2 H).

Step. 3. f (4-fluorobenzenesulfonylamino) methyll-phosphonic acid (iv).

A solution of diester 35 (0.58 g, 1.95 mmol) in dry CH2C12 (10 mL) and bromotrimethylsilane (1.5 mL, 11.7 mmol) was stirred at room temperature for 5 hours and then concentrated. The resulting residue was dissolved in anhydrous CH30H (10 mL) and stirred at room temperature for 20 minutes. Insolubles were filtered, and the filtrate was concentrated. Purification by trituration with CH2C12 gave the phosphonic acid (iv) (0. SIg, 97%) as a white solid : 1H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) #H 3.17 (d, J= 13.5 Hz, 2 H), 7.35 (m, 2 H), 7.97 (m, 2 H).

Step 4. [ 4-fluorobenzenesulfonylamino) methyll-phosphonic acid mono-(2-chloropyridin-3- yl) ester sodium salt (30).

A mixture of compound (iv) (52.6 mg, 0.20mmol), 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine (28.5 mg, 0.22 mmol), and CC13CN (100 1ll, 1. OOmmol) was heated at 105 °C in pyridine. After 6 h, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature and then concentrated. The residue was dissolved in H20 (10 mL) containing 1 N NaHC03 (0.6 mL), washed with EtOAc (5 mL x 2) and the water layer was lyophilized. Purification by reverse-phase preparative TLC (C, 8-silica gel, 20% CH3CN in H20) gave sodium monophosphonate salt 30 (30 mg, 38%) as a white fluffy solid : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 8H 3.17 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 2 H), 7.16 (m, 2 H), 7.24 (dd, J = 4.8,8.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.57 (m, 1 H), 7.77 (m, 2 H), 7.98 (m, 1 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, CD30D) 6p 13.4.

Example acidmono-(4-nitrophenyl)ester[(Benzylsulfonylamino)methyl]-p hosponic sodium salt (1).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting benzylsulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20), #H 3. 23 (d, J = 11. 7 Hz, 2 H), 4.40 (s, 2 H), 7.18 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 7.31 (m, 5 H), 8.13 (d, J = 9. 3 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D20) bp 14.8.

Example 3: ( (4-Fluorobenzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (2).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) #H 3.15 (d, J = 13.5 Hz, 2 H), 7.31 (m, 2 H), 7.40 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 7.95 (m, 2 H), 8.21 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, CD30D) bp 12.4 ; 13C NMR (75.4 MHz, CD30D) 8c 40.8 (d, Jc, P =153 HZ), 117.2 (d, J = 22. 69 Hz), 122.4 (d, J = 4.6 Hz), 126.2,131.2 (d, J = 9.4 Hz), 137.1 (d, J = 3.2 Hz), 144.8,159.4 (d, J = 7.7 Hz), 166.5 (d, JC, F = 252 Hz).

Example 4 : [ (4-Chlorobenzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (3).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- chlorobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8H 8.06 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 7.66 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.40 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.04 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 3.14 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 2 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 8p 14.1.

Example 5: ( (2-naphthylsulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid naono- (4-nitro phenyl) ester sodium salt (4).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- naphthylsulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 611 8. 19 (br. s, 1 H), 7.61 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 7.41-7.82 (m, 6 H), 6.73 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 3.22 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 2 H) ; 31P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 6P 13.4.

Example 6 : [(4Methoxybenzenesulfonylamino) ntethyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (5).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- methoxybenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: l H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8H 8.0 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.6 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.0 (d, J =9Hz, 2H, Ar-H), 6.8 (d, J=9Hz, 2H, Ar-H), 3.8 (s, 3H, CH3), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H, CH2).

[(4-Toluylsulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphonicacidmono-(4-nit rophenyl)Example7: ester sodium salt (6).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- toluysulfonyl chloride for 4-tluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2- chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, D20) #H 8.1 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.6 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.2 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar- H), 7.0 (d, J=9Hz, 2H, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H, CH2); 2.2 (s, 3H, CH3).

Example 8: (Benzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitro-phenyl) ester sodium salt (7).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting benzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8H 8.1 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.4-7.8 (m, 5 H, Ar-H), 7.0 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H, CH2). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 9 : [ (4-Fluorobenzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (3-pyridyl)<BR> <BR> <BR> ester sodium salt (8).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 3- hydroxypyridine for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: 'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) SH 7. 10-8.18 (m, 8 H), 3.08 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 2 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 6P 14.7.

Example 10: [ (3, 4-Dichlorobenzenesulfonylamino) methyl)-phosphonic acid niono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (9).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 3,4- dichlorobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-lluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) #H 8.24 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 8.01 (d, J = 2.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.74 (d, J = 2.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.69 (s, 1 H), 7.21 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 3.39 (d, J = 12.3 Hz, 2 H) ; 31P NMR (121 MHz, D2O) 8p 14.2.

Example II: mono-(4-nitrophenyl)acid ester sodium salt (10).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 1- napthylsulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, DzO) 8H 8.4 (d, 1 H, Ar-H), 8.2 (d, 1 H, Ar-H), 8.1 (d, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.8 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar- (m,3H,Ar-H),6.6(d,J=9Hz,2H,Ar-H),3.2(d,J=13Hz,2H,CH2);31PH), 7.4-7.6 NMR (121 MHz, D20) 8P 16.5 (t, 1 P).

Example 12: [(4-Fluorobenzenesulfonylamino)mehtyl]-phosphonic acid mono-(8- quinolinyl) ester sodium salt (11).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 8- hydroxyquinoline for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> lu NMR (300 MHz, D20) 6H 8.69 (m, I H), 8.22 (m, 1 H), 6.90-7.89 (m, 8 H), 3.10 (d, J = 13.8 Hz, 2 H).

Example 13 : [ (4-Nitrobenzenesulfonylamino) niethyl)-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (12).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- nitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 8H 8.6 (d, 2 H, Ar-H), 8.4 (d, J =9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 8.0 (d, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.4 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H, CH2); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 8p, 17.5 (t, 1 P).

Example 14: [ (2-Nitrobenzenesulfonylamino) methyll-phosphonic acid niono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (13).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- nitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesull~onyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 6H 8.0 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-ht), 7.8 (s, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.6 (s, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.6 (d, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.1 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D20) P, 17.5 (t, 1 P).

Example 15 : [ (2, 5-Dichlorobenzenesulfonylanzino) niethylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (14).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2,5- dichlorobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 6H 8.1 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.8 (s, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.4 (s, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.1 (d, J = 9 Hz, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H, CH2); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 8p 17.5 (t, 1 P).

Example 16 : [ (Thiophene-2-sulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (15).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 6H 8. 09 (d, J = 9.6 hz, 2 H), 7.69 (dd, J = 5. 1; 1.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.57 (dd, J = 3. 6; 1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.12 (d, J = 9.6 Hz, 2 H), 7.05 (dd, J = 5. 1; 3.6 Hz, 1 H), 3.16 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H).

Example 17 : [ (4-tert-Butylbenzenesulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (16).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4-tert- butylbenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-tluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8n 8.2 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.8 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.6 (m, 2 H, Ar- H), 7.1 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J= 13Hz, 2H, CH2), 1.2 (s, 9 H, t-Bu); 3'PNMR (121 MHz, D20) 6P 18 (t, 1P).

Example 18 : [ (4-Trifluoromethylbenzenesulfonylamino) methylj-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (17).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- trifluoromethylbenzenesulfonyl for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) #H 8. 2 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.8 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.6 (m, 2 H, Ar- H), 7.1 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H, CH2); 3iP NMR (121 MHz, D20) 6P 18 (t, IP). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 19 : [ (2, 4-Dinitrobenzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono-<BR> <BR> <BR> (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (18).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2,4- dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8H 8.61 (m, 1 H); 8.35 (m, 1 H), 8.15 (m, 1 H), 7.98 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H); 7.02 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 3.41 (d, J = 11.4 Hz, 2 H).

Example 20. [ (8-Quinolylsulfonylamino) methyll-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (19).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 8- quinolylsulfonyl chloride for 4-tluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 6H 6.68-8.78 (m, 10 H), 3.13 (d, J= 12.9 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D20) Sp 13.4.

Example 21 : [2, 4, 6-triniethylbenzenesulfonylaniino) methylJ-phosphonic acid noono- (4- nitrophenol) ester sodium salt (21).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2,4,6- trimethylbenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR D2O)#H8.2(d,J=9Hz,2H,Ar-H),6.8(s,2H,Ar-H,3.2(d,J=13hz,MHz, 2H, CH2), 2.3 (s, 6H, CH3), 2. 1 (s, 3H, CH3) ; 3'PNMR (121 MHz, D20) 6p 18 (t, 1P).

Example 22: ( (4-Chloro-3-nitrobenzenesulfonylamino) niethylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (22).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- chloro-3-nitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8H 8.4 (s, 1 H, Ar-H), 8.2 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.9 (d, 1 H, Ar- (d,1H,Ar-H),7.2(s,2H,Ar-H),3.2(d,=13Hz,2H,CH2);31PNMR(121H0, 7.7 MHz, D20) 8p 18 (t, 1 P).

Example 23: [2-Bromobenzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (23).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- bromobenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8 8.2 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 8.1 (s, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.6 (d, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.4 (m, H, Ar-H), 7.2 (s, 2 H, Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 13 Hz, 2 H, CH,) ;"P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 6P 17 (t, 1P).

Example 24 : [(3-Pyridinesulfonylamino) methyl7-phosphonic acid mono-(4nitrophenyl) ester sodiunz salt (24).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 3- pyridinesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 6H 8.80 (s, 1 H), 8.55 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1 H), 8.13 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 1 H), 8.03 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.46 (dd, J = 4.8,8.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.05 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 3.19 (d, J = 12.3 Hz, 2 H); 3tP NMR (121 MHz, D20) 8p 13.7.

Exmple 25: mono-(3-pyridinyl)acid ester sodium salt (25).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 3- pyridinesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 3- hydroxypyridine for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: tH NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) BH 3.17 (d, J = 13.2 Hz, 2 H), 7.37 (dd, J = 4.8,8.1 Hz, 1 H),

7.57-7.69 (m, 2 H), 8.23-8.29 (m, 2 H), 8.40 (br s, 1 H), 8.74 (dd, J = 1.2,4.8 Hz, 1 H), 9.00 (d, J= 1.5 Hz, 1 H); 31P NMR (121 MHz, CD30D) 8p 12.1. ; 13C NMR (75.4 MHz, CD30D) 8 c 40.6 (d, J = 152 Hz), 125.5,125.7,130.5 (d, J = 3. 8 Hz), 136.8,138.2,143.5 (d, J = 4. 3 Hz), 144.7,148.7,151.2 (d, J = 7.7 Hz), 153.8.

Example 26 : [ (3-Dibenzofuransulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (27).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 3- dibenzofuransulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, D20) 6H 8.2 (s, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.8 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.45 (m, 3 H, Ar- H), 7.2 (t, J=7. 5Hz, 2H, Ar-ht), 6.8 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H. Ar-H), 3.2 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H, CH2); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D2O) 6P 17.17 (t, J = 12.2 Hz, 1 P). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Exaniple 27 : ( (2-Thiophenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (2, 4, 6-<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> trifluorophenyl) ester sodium salt (28).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 2,4,6-trifuorophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20), AH 7.73 (dd, J = 5.0; 1.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.62 (dd, J = 3.6,1.5 Hz, I H), 7.10 (dd, J = 5. 0,3.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.77 (m, 2 H), 3.20 (d, J = 13_2 Hz, 2 H).

Example 28: (2-Pyridinesulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (31).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- pyridinesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D2O), 6H 8.49 (m, 1 H), 8.08 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.86-7.98 (m, 2 H), 7.52 (m, 1 H), 7.11 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 3.28 (d, J = 12.3 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D2O), 8p 13.7.

Example 29: (2-Pyridinesulfonylamino) niethylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (2-chloro- pyridine-3-yl) ester sodium salt (32).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- pyridinesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound

was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, D20), AH 8.48 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.83-7.98 (m, 3 H), 7.57 (d, J = 8. 1 Hz, I H), 7.51 (m, 1 H), 7.23 (dd, J = 4.8,8.1 Hz, 1 H), 3.30 (d, J = 12.0 Hz, 2 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, D20) #P 19.0.

Example 30 : [ (5-Isoquinolinesulfonylaniino) ntethyl)-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (33).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 5- isoquinolinesulfonyl chloride for 4-lluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 8H 8.92 (br s, 1 H), 8.31 (br s, 1 H), 8.21 (dd, J = 1.0,7.5 Hz, 1 H), 8.12 (d, J = 6. 3 Hz, 1 H), 7.98 (d, J=8. 1Hz, lH), 7.62 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.52 (m, I H), 6.53 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 3.18 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, D20) #P 12.5.

Example 31: ( (2-Pyridinesulfonylamino) methyl)-phosphonic acid (34).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, steps 2-3, substituting 2-pyridinesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 6H 8.53 (m, 1 H), 7.90-8.05 (m, 2 H), 7.58 (m, 1), 3.07 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 2 H);'P NMR (121 MHz, D2O) 6p 15.8.

Example 32: [(5-Isoquinolinesulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphonic acid mono-(2- chloropyridin-3-yl) ester sodium salt (36).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 5- isoquinolinesulfonyl chloride for 4-lluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, DzO) on 9.00 (s, 1 H), 8.36 (d, J = 6.0 Hz, 1 H), 8.29 (d, J=7. 2Hz, l H), 8.19 (d, J = 6. 0 Hz, 1 H), 8.06 (d, J=7. 5Hz, lH), 7.74 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.57 (m, 1 H), 7.07 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 1 H), 6.92 (dd, J = 4. 8,8.1 Hz, 1 H), 3.24 (d, J = 11.7 Hz, 2 H);"P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 8p 12.1.

Example 33: [ (4-Fluorobenzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (2- bromopyridin-3-yl) ester sodium salt (37).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- bromo-3-hydroxypyridine for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 8H 7.95 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 2 H), 7.76 (m, 2 H), 7.51 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 2 H), 7.25 (dd, J = 4. 8,8.1 Hz, I H), 7.16 (m, 2 H), 3.17 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H).

[(2-Thiophenesulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphonicacidmono-(2- Example34A: chloropyridin-3-yl) ester sodium salt (38).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example l, substituting 2- thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-tluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained: 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) #H 7. 99 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.70 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.58 (m, 2 H), 7.26 (dd, J = 8. 4; 5.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.06 (t, J=4. 8Hz, l H), 3.21 (d, J = 12. 9 Hz, 2 H).

[(4-phenylbenzenesulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphonicacidmono -Example35: (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (39).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- phenylbenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4- nitrophenol for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) ÇH 7.87 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.73 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 2 H), 7.59 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 2H), 7.49 (d, J=6. 6Hz, 2H), 7.35 (m, 3H), 6.91 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 3.16 (d, J=12.3 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D2O) 8p 12.6. <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 36 : [ (4-Phenylbenzenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (2-chloro- pyridine-3-yl) ester sodium salt (40).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 4- phenylbenzenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) #H 8. 04 (m, 1 H), 7.78 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2 H),. 7.65 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2 H), 7.54 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 2 H), 7.31-7.43 (m, 3 H), 7.16 (m, 1 H), 3.14 (d, J= 12.6 Hz, 2 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, D2O) bp 14.3. <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Exaniple 37 : ( 5-Bromo-2-thiophenesulfonylamino) niethylJ-phosphonic acid nzono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (41).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example l, substituting 5- bromo-2-thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) #H 8. 10 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2 H), 7.30 (d, J = 4.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.10 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2 H), 7.02 (d, 7= 4. 2 Hz, I H), 3.18 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H) ; 3P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 6P 13.3.

Exaniple 38 : [ (5-Bromo-2-thiophenesulfonylamino) methyl)-phosphonic acid mono- (2- chloropyridin-3-yl) ester sodium salt (42).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 5- bromo-2-thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained : 1H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) 8n 7.96 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, l H), 7.55 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.31 (d, J = 3.9 Hz, 1 H), 7.22 (dd, J = 4.8,8.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.01 (d, J = 3.9 Hz, 1 H), 3.21 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H) ; 31P NMR (121 MHz, CD30D) 8p 15. 1.

Example 39 : [ (2-Thiophenesulfonylamino) methylJ-phosphonic acid (43).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, steps 2-3, substituting 2-thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) 6H 7.79 (dd, J = 4.8,12.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.64 (dd, J = 3. 9,1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.17 (dd, J = 4. 8,3.9 Hz, 1 H), 3.16 (d, J = 13.2 Hz, 2 H).

Example 40: [ (5-Bromo-2-thiophenesulfonylamino) methyll-phosphonic acid (58).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, steps 2-3, substituting 5-bromo-2-thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained: IH NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) #H 7.47 (d, J= 3.9 Hz, 1 H), 7.25 (d, J = 3.9 Hz, 1 H), 3.23 (d, J = 13.5 Hz, 2 H); 3'P NMR (121 MHz, CD30D) bp 17.9; 13C NMR (75.4 MHz, CD30D) 8c 40.8 (d, J = 157 Hz), 120.3,132.1,133.7,143.0.

Example 41: [ (3- (N-Phenylcarbamoylamino)-sulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid (59).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, steps 2-3, substituting 3- (N-phenylcarbamoylamino)-sulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained: 1H NMR (300 MHz, #DMSO-d6) on 9.11 (s, 1 H), 8.18 (s, l H), 7.73 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.63 (d, J = 8. 7 Hz, 2 H), 7.56 (m, 1 H), 7.46 (d, 78Hz,2H),7.30(app.t,J=7.8Hz,2H),7.0(m,1H),2.80(d,J=13.5Hz,2H ),= 31p NMR (121 MHz, DMSO-d6) bp 17.0.

[(2-Thiophenesulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphonicacidmono-(4- Example42: chlorophenyl) ester ammonium salt (61).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 2- thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-tluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 4-chlorophenol

for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained: iH NMR (400 MHz, D2O) 8H 7.87 (dd, J = 1.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.73 (dd, J = 1.5,4 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.34- 7.37 (m, 2H, Ar-h'), 7.23 (dd, J = 4,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.06-7.08 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 3.26 (d, J = 27.0 Hz, 2 H, NCH2P) ; 3Ip NMR: (164 MHz, D20) 6P 14.4;'3C NMR (100 MHz, D2O) 8c 39.5 (d, J = 152 Hz), 123.0 (d, J=3. 5 Hz), 130.2,134.2,134.6,138.1,150.7. <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 43 : [ (3- (N-Phenylcarbamoylamino) benzenesulfonylamino) nzethyl)-phosphonic acid mono-(2-chloropyridin-3-yl) ester sodium salt (70).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting (N- phenylcarbamoylamino) sulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) 8H 8.08 (m, 1 H), 7.64-7.91 (m, 5 H), 7.49 (m, 2 H), 7.34 (m, 3 H), 7.08 (m, 1 H), 3.20 (d, J = 13. 8 Hz, 2 H) ;"P NMR (121 MHz, CD30D) 6p 13.2.

Example 44 : chloropyridin-3-yl) ester sodium salt (71).

Following procedures analogous to those described in Example 1, substituting 5- bromo-2-thiophenesulfonyl chloride for 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl chloride in step 2 and 5- chloro-3-hydroxypyridine for 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in step 4, the title compound was obtained:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 8H 8. 20 (br. s. 1 H), 8.11 (br. s. 1 H), 7.54 (m, 1 H), 7.33 (d, J=4. 2Hz, 1 H), 7.05 (d, J = 4.2 Hz, 1 H), 3.20 (d, J = 12. 6 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D2O) bp 13.9.

Example 45: Phenylsulfonylhydrazinyl-mono- (4-nitrophenyl)-phosphonanaide (189).

Benzenesulfonyl hydrazide (0.5 g, 2.9 mmol) and pyridine (0.27 g, 3.2 mmol) in 50 mL of dry THF were added to a stirring solution of p-nitrophenylphosphoryl dichloride (0.75 g, 2.9 mmol) in 50 mL of dry THF at 0 °C. After addition was complete, the solution was brought to room temperature and stirring was continued for 4 more hours. Finally, 1 N NaOH (9 mL) was added with stirring. Volatiles were removed, and the remaining aqueous solution was freeze-dried. The resultant crude product was more than 85% pure, but final purification was accomplished by preparative HPLC on an SMT C18 column using water/acetonitrile gradient. Analytical HPLC under similar conditions showed the product to be one peak (>95% pure). 1H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) : 8n 8. 1 (d, 2 H, p-nitrophenyl), 7.4-7.65 (m, 5 H, Ar-H), 7. 1 (d, 2 H, p-nitrophenyl); 3'P NMR (162 MHz) 8p 0.08 (s).

Example 46 : [ (2-thiophenesulfonylanaino)-methylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (3- chlorophenyl) ester ammonium salt (48). H P--OME CI \ NHZ (CH2pn NP_Me NH4- s/ s'o P (OMe) 3, s 0 0 0 NaOMe. MeOH 0 (v) (vi) (vii) Me3SiBr ci S 0 0 OH p H OH E 2. s o \o Ho I \ ci s /43 (viii) pyridine 1. NaOH, H20 2. NH40H cl o fl r sCI NHQ+ 0 0 48

Step 1: 2-Thiophenesulfonamide (vi).

At 0 °C, a concentrated solution of ammonium hydroxide (50 mL, 1.35 mol) was added to a solution of 2-thiophenesulfonyl chloride (50 g, 0.27 mol) in methanol (300 mL).

The mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight, cooled in an ice bath, and a concentrated solution of HCl was added until the pH reached 7. The resultant solution was extracted with ethyl acetate, and the combined organic layers were dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and concentrated to afford 45 g of a brownish solid. Trituration with

methylene chloride-hexanes (1: 1) afforded the title compound:'H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) #H 7.73 (m, 1 H), 7.59 (m, 1 H), 7. 05 (m, 1 H).

Step 2 [ (2-Thiophenesultonylamino) methyphosphonic acid dimethyl ester (vii).

To a solution of 2-thiophenesulfonamide (vi) (1.0 g, 6.1 mmol) in methanol (5 mL) was added a catalytic amount of sodium methoxide and paraformaldehyde (200 mg, 6.7 mmol). The reaction was heated to 55 °C for 1 h, and then the homogeneous solution was cooled and trimethyl phosphite (0.8 mL, 6.8 mmol) was added. After heating the reaction mixture for an additional 1 h at 55 °C, the reaction mixture was cooled and concentrated. The residue was dissolved in dichloromethane (15 mL), washed with water (10 mL), dried (MgS04), filtered and concentrated. Purification by flash chromatography (elution with methanol-chloroform; 1: 19) yielded (vii) (600 mg, 34%) as a colorless solid: 3Ip NMR: (162 MHz, CDC13) 8p 23.7. Also isolated was the corresponding N-methylated compound, [ (2- thiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid dimethyl ester (234 mg, 13%) as a colorless solid: 3C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl30 8c 36.7,44.6 (d, J = 165 Hz), 53.2 (d, J = 6.5 Hz), 127.6,132.4,132.6,135.7.

Step 3 : (2-Thiophenesulfonylamino methyll-phosphonic acid (43).

The dimethyl ester (vii) was treated with bromotrimethylsilane according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 3, to afford the title compound:'H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) 5 H 7.79 (dd, J = 4.8,1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.64 (dd, J = 3.9,1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.17 (dd, J = 4.8, 3.9 Hz, 1 H), 3.16 (d, J= 13.2 Hz, 2 H).

Step 4: [(2-Thiophenesullonvlamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid di- (3-chlorophenyl) ester (viii).

To a solution of 3-chlorophenol (700 IIL, 6.6 mmol) in pyridine (8 mL) at-45 °C was added thionyl chloride (230 pL, 3.2 mmol). The reaction was stirred at-45 °C for 1 h, and then a solution of phosphonic acid (200 mg, 0.78 mmol) in pyridine (5 mL) was slowly added. The reaction mixture was warmed to ambient temperature overnight, and the solution was then concentrated. The residue was dissolved in dichloromethane (15 mL) and washed with water (10 mL). The organic extracts were dried (MgSO4) and concentrated, and the residue was purified by flash chromatography (elution with ethyl acetate-hexanes; 1 : 1) to yield the diester (viii) (86 mg, 23%) as a colorless solid: 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) AH 7.57-7.58 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.14-7.26 (m, 6 H, Ar-H), 7.04-7.09 (m, 3 H, Ar-h'), 6.46 (dt, J= 2.5,6. 5 Hz, 1 H, NH), 3.69 (dd, J = 6.5,12.5 Hz, 2 H, NCHP).

Step 5: f2-Thiophenesulfonylamino methyl]-phosphonic acid mono-(3-chlorophenyl) ester ammonium salt (48).

To a solution of diester (viii) (86 mg, 0.18 mmol) in dioxane (1.5 mL) was added 1 N sodium hydroxide solution (720 poil, 0.72 mmol) and water (4 mL). Aster 3 h, the solution was neutralized and concentrated. the residue was purified by flash chromatography (elution with chloroform: methanol: concentrated ammonium hydroxide; 8.2: 2: 0.25) to afford the title compound (28 mg, 40%) as a colorless solid:'H NMR (400 MHz, D2O) 8H 7.84 (d, J = 5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7. 71 (d, J=3. 5Hz, Ar-H), 7.30 (t, J = 8 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.15-7.21 (m, 3 H, Ar- H), 7.01-7.03 (m, 1 H, Ar-H), 3.23 (d, J = 14 Hz, 2 H, NCHP); 31p NMR: (164 MHz, D20) 6 p14.5.

[(2-Thiophenesulfonylamino)mehtyl]-phosphonicacidmono-(3- Example47: dimethylamino)phenyl) ester ammonium salt (78).

According to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, the phosphonic acid 43 was treated with 3- (dimethylamino) phenol. The ammonium salt was purified by flash chromatography (elution with chloroform: methanol: concentrated ammonium hydroxide; 8: 2: 0.25), followed by lyophilization, to afford the title compound:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) bEI 7.67 (m, 1 H), 7.54 (m, 1 H), 7.11 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 1 H), 7.04 (m, 1 H), 6.68 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 1 H), 6.64 (s, 1 H), 6.48 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 1 H), 3.07, d, J = 13.2 Hz, 2 H), 2.73 (s, 6 H); 31P NMR: (121 MHz, D20) 6P 14.6; X3C NMR (75 MHz, D20) 8c 147.69,144.91,132.66, 129.13,128.76,125.97,123.49,110.35,108.23,104.94,38.00,34.21 , (d, J = 150.0 Hz). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 48 : [(2-Thiophenesulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono-(benzyl) ester ammonium salt (79).

According to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, the phosphonic acid 43 was treated with benzyl alcohol. The ammonium salt was purified by flash chromatography (elution with chloroform: methanol: concentrated ammonium hydroxide; 8: 2: 0.25), followed by lyophilization, to afford the title compound:'H NMR (300 MHz, D2O) bl 7.71 (m, 1 H), 7.58 (m, 1 H), 7.29 (s, 5 H), 7.07 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.75 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 2 H), 2.93 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR: (121 MHz, D2O) 6P 16.65 ; ^13~C NMR (75 MHz, D2O) 8c 132.75; 123.47,123.13,62.55,34.40, (d, J = 147.4 Hz).

Exaniple 49 : [ (2-Thiophenesulfonylamino) nzethylj-phosphonic acid mono-ntethyl ester sodium salt (80).

The diester (vii) was treated with sodium hydroxide according to the procedure described in Example 46, step 5, to produce the title compound:'H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) #H 7.65 (dd, J = 4.8,1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.62 (dd, J = 3.6,1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.15 (dd, J = 4.8, 3.6 Hz, 1 H), 3.55 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 3 H), 3.04 (d, J = 13.8 Hz, 2 H); 31P NMR: (121 MHz, CD30D) 8p 17.60;'3C NMR (75 MHz, CD30D) 8 52.02, 40.11, (d, J = 147.2 Hz).

Example 50: [(3-thiophenesulfonylamino) methyll-phosphonic acid (ix).

Starting with 3-thiophenesulfonyl chloride, procedures analogous to those described in Example 46, steps 1-3, were followed to produce the title compound: IH NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) âH 8.15 (dd, J = 3,1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.66 (dd, J = 5.4,3.0 Hz, 1 H), 7.44 (dd, J = 5.4, 1.2 Hz, 1 H), 3.18 (d, J = 13.5 Hz, 2 H); 13C NMR (75.4 MHz, CD30D) 8c 140.8,131.8, 129.4,126.6,40.7 (d, J = 157 Hz). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 51 : [ (3-Thiophenesulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono (3-pyridyl) ester sodium salt (55).

Phosphonic acid compound (ix) was treated with 3-hydroxypyridine according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, to provide the title compound: 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) #H 8.15 (br s, 2 H), 8.03 (m, 1 H), 7.49 (m, 1 H), 7.44 (br d, J = 8.7 Hz, 1 H), 7.28 (m, 1 H), 7.25 (m, 1 H), 3.10 (d, J = 13.0 Hz, 2 H). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 52 : [(3-Thiophenesulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono-(2-chloro-3- pyridyl) ester sodium salt (56).

Phosphonic acid compound (ix) was treated with 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, to provide the title compound:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) #H 8.05 (dd, J = 3.0,1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.98 (br d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.57 (m, 1 H), 7.48 (dd, J = 5. 4,3.0 Hz, I H), 7.25 (m, 2 H), 3.18 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 2 H).

[(3Thiophesulfonylamino)mehtyl]-phosphonicacidmono-(4-nit rophenyl)Example53: ester (57).salt Phosphonic acid compound (ix) was treated with 4-nitrophenol according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, to provide the title compound:'H NMR (300

MHz, D2O) #H 8.10 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 8.04 (m, 1 H), 7.50 (dd, J = 5.1,3.0 Hz, 1 H), 7.26 (dd, J = 5. 1,1.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.14 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 3.11 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 54 : ( (3-Thiophenesulfonylanzino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (2-fluoro-4- nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (69).

Phosphonic acid compound (ix) was treated with 2-fluoro-4-nitrophenol according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, to provide the title compound: 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) 6H 8.05 (m, 1 H), 7.99 (m, 1 H), 7.93 (m, 1 H), 7.49 (m, 1 H), 7.27 (m, 2 H), 3.18 (d, 12.6Hz,2H).= [(3-Furylsulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphonicacidmono-(4-nitroph enyl)Example55: ester sodium salt (74).

Step (x)3-Furylsulfonamide 3-Furylsulfonyl chloride was treated with ammonia according to the procedure described in Example 46, step 1, to produce the title compound.

Step 2 : (3-Furvlsulfonylamino) methyll phosphonic acid (73).

3-Furylsulfonamide (x) was treated with paraformaldehyde and trimethylphosphite, followed by treatment with bromotrimethylsilane, according to the procedure described in Example 46, steps 2 and 3, to produce the title compound: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CD30D) #H 8.13 (dd, J = 1.5,0. 6 Hz, 1 H), 7.71 (t, J = 1.8 Hz, 1 H), 6.78 (dd, J = 1. 8,0.6Hz, 1 H), 3.21 (d, J = 13.5 Hz, 2 H);'3C NMR (75 MHz, CD30D) 8c 147.2,146.4,128.0,109.3,40.7 (d, J = 158 Hz).

Step 3: [ (3-Furvlsulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (74).

Compound 73 was treated with 4-nitrophenol in the presence of CC13CN according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, to produce the title compound:'H NMR (300 MHz, D20) aH 8.11 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 7.80 (m, 1 H), 7.51 (m, 1 H), 7.16 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2 H), 6.61 (m, 1 H), 3.16 (d, J = 13.0 Hz, 2 H).

Exmaple acidmono-(2-fluoro-4-[(3-Furylsulfonylamino)methyl]-phosphon ic nitrophenyl) ester sodium salt (75).

Compound 73 was treated with 2-fluoro-4-nitrophenol in the presence of CC13CN according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, to produce the title compound : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) #H 8.00 (m, 3 H), 7.53 (m, I H), 7.35 (t, J = 8.4 Hz, 1 H), 6.63 (m, 1 H), 3.21 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H).

Example 57 : [ (3-Furylsulfonylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (2-chloropyridin-3- yl) ester sodium salt (76).

Compound 73 was treated with 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine in the presence of CC13CN according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4, to produce the title compound : 1H NMR (300 MHz, D20) SH 8.01 (m, 1 H), 7.99 (m, 1 H), 7.62 (dt, J = 8.1,1.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.51 (t, J = 2.0 Hz, 1 H), 7.27 (dd, J = 8.1,4.8 Hz, 1 H), 6.61 (dd, J = 2. 0,0.9 Hz, 1 H), 3.20 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 2 H).

Example 58 : [ (2-benzothiophenesulfonylamino) methyl)-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (77).

Step 1: 2-Benzothiophenesulfonamide Preparation of 2-benzothiophenesulfonamide was effected using the reported procedure (S. L. Graham et al., J. Med. Chem. 1989,32,2548).

Step 2: [ (2-Benzothiophenesulfonvlamino methyll-phosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (77).

2-Benzothiophenesulfonamide was treated with paraformaldehyde and trimethylphosphite, followed by treatment with bromotrimethylsilane, according to the procedure described in Example 46, steps 2 and 3. The crude product was purified by flash chromatography (elution with dichloromethane: methanol: concentrated ammonium hydroxide; 7: 3. 5: 0.5), followed by lyophilization, to afford the ammonium salt 77:'H NMR (300MHz, DMSO-d6) sH7.9 (m, 5 H, Ar-H), 7.4 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.2 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar- H), 2.8 (d, J = 12. 9 Hz, 2 H, CH2); 31P NMR (121 MHz, D20) 6P 12.08 (t, J = 12.2 Hz, 1 P).

[(2-Thiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino)methyl]-phosphonicaci dmono-(4-Example59: nitropVIenyl) esterammonium salt (47).

Step 1: [ (2-Thiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino) methyll-phosphonic acid (xi).

To a solution of [(2-thiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino) methyl]-phosphonic acid dimethyl ester (obtained as described in Example 46, step 2) (180 mg, 0.6 mmol) in dichloromethane (3 mL) at 0 °C was slowly added bromotrimethylsilane (190 PL, 1.4 mmol).

The reaction was gradually warmed to room temperature and allowed to stir overnight. The reaction mixture was concentrated, the residue was redissolved in dichloromethane, and the solution was again concentrated. Methanol (10 mL) was added to the residue, and the solution was stirred at room temperature for 30 min. The solution was then filtered and concentrated. The oily residue was triturated with 1: 1 ether-hexanes, and an orange solid was collected by filtration. The orange solid was boiled in dichloromethane (3 mL), cooled, and filtered to yield the title compound (120 mg, 74%) as a colorless solid: IH NMR (400 MHz, CD30D) 6H 7.87 (dd, J = 1.5,4 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.66 (dd, J = 1.5,3.5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.25 (dd, J-4,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 3.31 (d, J = 12. 5 Hz, 2 H, CH2P), 2.92 (s, 3 H, NCH3), Step 2: [ (2-Thiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino) methyLphosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (47).

Compound (xi) was treated with 4-nitrophenol according to the procedure described in Example 1, step 4. The crude product was purified by flash chromatography (elution with chloroform: methanol: concentrated ammonium hydroxide; 8: 2: 0.25) to afford the ammonium salt 47 (43%) as a colorless solid:'H NMR (400 MHz, CD30D) #H 8.19-8.23 (m, 2 H, Ar- H), 7.85 (dd, J = 1, 5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-f, 7.62 (dd, J = 1,4 Hz, 1 H , Ar-H), 7.44 (dd, J = 1,9.5 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.23 (dd, J = 4, 5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 3.30 (d, J-13.5 Hz, 2 H, NCH2P), 2.93 (s, 3 H, NCH3); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CD30D) 8c 37.1,47.4,122.4 (d, J = 4 Hz), 9, 133.7 (d, J = 7 Hz), 137.1,144.7,159.5; 31P NMR (162 MHz, CD30D) 8p 12.7; MS (neg.

FAB) m/z 391 (M-1,100%), 306 (15%), 153 (35%). Exan : ple 60 : [2-Phenyl-1- (thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-ethyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4-<BR> nitrophenyl) ester antntoniuni salt. (44) 0 PhCH2CHO TMSiBr 0 Ph oh AcC,""OH ''iii OEt S O H OH ACCU xii xiii pu 1. CCI3CN S O H P O N02 S, It I--. OIF- 44 pyridine 2. NH40H

Stepl: [2-Phenyl-1- (thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-ethyl]-phosphonic acid diethyl ester (xii).

To a suspension of sulfonamide (vi) (500 mg; 0.31 mmol) in acetyl chloride (5 mL) was slowly added diethyl phosphite (400 VL; 0.31 mmol). The reaction was cooled to 0°C and then phenylacetaldehyde (450 uL; 0.39 mmol) was added dropwise. The reaction was gradually warmed to ambient temperature and after 6 hrs the homogeneous solution was concentrated. The residue was diluted with dichloromethane (25 mL) then washed successively with water (10 mL), saturated sodium bicarbonate (10 mL) and brine (10 mL).

The combined organic extracts wre dried (MgSO4), evaporated and initially purified by flash chromatography (ethyl acetate-hexanes; 3: 2). A second purification by flash chromatography (acetone-hexanes; 3: 7) yielded diethyl phosphonate (xii) (437 mg, 35%) as a colorless solid; 'H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) BH 1.22 (t, J = 7 Hz, 3 H, OCH2CH3), 1.26 (t, J = 7 Hz, 3 H, OCH2CH3), 2.89 (dt, J = 8,14 Hz, 1 H, CHPh), 3.12 (dt, J = 6,14 Hz, 1 H, CHPh), 3.96-4.23 (m, 5 H, NCHP and OCHCH3), 6.38 (dd, J = 2,9.5 Hz, 1 H, NH), 6.92-6.93 (m, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.12-7.20 (m, 5 H, Ar-H), 7.33-7.34 (m, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.43-7.45 (m, 1 H, Ar-H).

Step 2: r2-Phenyl-1- (thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-ethyl-phosphonic acid (xiii).

To a solution of diethyl phosphonate (xii) (745 mg; 1.8 mmol) in dichloromethane (8 mL) at 0 °C was slowly added bromotrimethylsilane (2 mL; 15.2 mmol). The reaction was gradually warmed to room temperature and the following day the solution was evaporated.

The residue was redissolved in dichloromethane (10 mL), evaporated and the process

repeated once more. Methanol (10 mL) was added to the residue and the solution stirred at room temperature for 30 minutes, then the solution was filtered and concentrated. The oily residue was triturated with 1: 1 ether-hexanes and the orange solid collected by filtration.

Finally, the orange solid was boiled in dichloromethane (5 mL), cooled and filtered to yield pure phosphonic acid (xiii) (512 mg, 80%) as a colorless solid:'H NMR (400MHz, CD30D) BH 2.71 (dt, J = 14,10 Hz, l H, CHPh), 3.13 (ddd, J = 4,8,14 Hz, 1 H, CHPh), 3.89 (ddd, J = 4,10,14 Hz, NCHP), 6.86 (dd, J = 3.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.07-7.15 (m, 6 H, Ar-H), 7.53 (dd, J=1.5,5Hz, lH, Ar-H).

Step 3: [2-Phenyl-1-thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-ethyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl ! ester ammonium salt (44) To sealed tube containing phosphonic acid (xiii) (50 mg; 0.14 mmol) and sublimed 4- nitrophenol (24 mg; 0.17 mmol) was added pyridine (0.7 mL) and trichloroacetonitrile (100 pL; 1.0 mmol). The reaction was heated to 105 °C for 6 hrs then was cooled and concentrated. The residue was purified by flash chromatography (chloroform-methanol- concentrated ammonium hydroxide; 8: 2: 0.25) to yield the ammonium salt 44 (36.4 mg, 52%) as a colorless solid:'H NMR (400 MHz, CD30D) 8H 2.83 (td, J = 9,14 Hz, 1 H, CHPh), 3.23-3.29 (m, 1 H, CHPh), 3.95-4.02 (m, 1 H, NCHP), 6.85 (dd, J = 4,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.08-7.20 (m, 6 H, Ar-H), 7.27-7.31 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.52 (dd, J = 1.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 8.12-8.16 (m, 2 H, Ar-H); 3ip NMR: (162MHz, CD30D) 8p 16.7; 13C NMR: (100MHz, CD30D) 8p 38.1,122.0,125.9,127.3,128.3,129.2,130.6,132.2,132.3,144.4,1 44.5.

Example 61: [2-Methyl-l-thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-propylj-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (52) The title compound was synthesized according to the three-step procedure described in Example 60, Steps 1-3, but substituting isobutyraldehyde for phenylacetaldehyde. The mono ester 52 was isolated as a colorless solid (13% yield over three steps): IH NMR: (400 MHz, DMSO-D6) bl-l 0.86 (d, J = 7 Hz, 3 H, CH3), 0.93 (d, J = 7 Hz, 3 H, CH3), 2.02-2.10 (m, 1 H, (CH3) 2CH), 3.28-3.35 (m, 1 H, NCHP), 7.03 (dd, J = 3.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.12 (br s, 5 H, NH), 7.17 (d, J = 9 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.60 (dd, J = 1,3.5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.75 (dd, J= 1,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 8.06-8.10 (m, 2 H, Ar-H); 3'P NMR: (162MHz, DMSO-D6) 8p 14.2; 13C <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> NMR: (100MHz, DMSO-D6) #C 19.8,21.3, (d, J = 10), 30.7,58.3 (d, J = 142.3), 121.3 (d, J = 4.5), 125.9,128.2,132.2,132.4,142.2,144.7,161.2.

Example 62: [Phenyl- (thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-methyl)-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (53).

The title compound was synthesized according to the three-step procedure in Example 60, Steps 1-3, but substituting benzaldehyde for phenylacetaldehyde. The mono ester 53 was isolated as a colorless solid (8% yield over three steps):'H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-D6) 6H 4.44 (d, J = 22 Hz, 1 H, NCHP), 6.83 (dd, J = 4,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.00-7.07 (m, 4 H), 7.17- 7.33 (m, 9 H), 7.60 (dd, J = 1.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 8.08-8.12 (m, 2 H, Ar-H); 3SP NMR: (162MHz, DMSO-D6) 8p 10.1;'3C NMR: (100MHz, DMSO-D6) 8c 58.0 (d, J = 140.2 Hz) 121.6 (d, J=4Hz), 125.9,126.9,127.9,128.1,129.1 (d, J = 5 Hz), 132.3,132.6,138.9, 142.4,143.6 and 161.4.

Example 63: [2-Phenyl-1- (thiophene-2-sulfonylanzino)-ethylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (2- chloropyridin-3-yl) ester ammonium salt (46).

To a sealed tube containing phosphonic acid (xiii) (134 mg; 0.39 mmol) and 2-chloro- 3-pyridinol (60 mg; 0.46 mmol) was added pyridine (1.9 mL) and trichloroacetonitrile (270 pL; 2.7 mmol). The reaction was heated to 105 °C for 6 hours then was cooled and concentrated. The residue was purified by flash chromatography (chloroform-methanol- concentrated ammonium hydroxide; 9: 2: 0.1) to yield the ammonium salt 46 (100 mg, 54%) as a colorless solid:'H NMR: (400 MHz, CD30D) 8H 2.87 (td, J = 9,14 Hz,. 1 H, CHPh), 3.28-3.36 (m, 1 H, CHPh), 4.01 (ddd, J = 4.5,9,17 Hz, 1 H, NCHP), 6.81 (dd, J = 3.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.07-7.21 (m, 6 H. Ar-H), 7.28 (dd, J = 4.5,8 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.46 (dd, J = 1.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.91-7.93 (m, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.99-8.02 (m, 1 H, Ar-H); 3'P NMR: (162MHz, CD30D) 5p 17.0; 13C NMR: (100MHz, DMSO-D6) 8c 38.3,55.6, (d, J = 147.6 Hz), 124.3, 1,130.4,131.8,132.1,140.3 (d, J = 10 Hz), 142.4,142.7,144.5,147.9.

Example 64 : [2-Methyl-1- (thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-propyl]-phosphonic acid niono- (2- chloropyridin-3-yl) ester ammonium salt (54) Following the same procedure as described in Example 63, but substituting the phosphonic acid derived from Example 61 for phosphonic acid (xiii), the title compound was obtained. The mono ester 54 was isolated as a colorless solid (37% yield): 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD30D) 6H 1.02 (d, J = 7 Hz, 3 H, CH3), 1.06 (d, J = 7 Hz, 3 H, CH3), 2.24-2.32 (m, l H, (CH3) 2CH), 3.69 (dd, J = 3.5,19.5 Hz, 1 H, NCHP), 6.91 (dd, J = 4,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.25 (dd, J = 5,8 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.52-7.59 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.80-7.82 (m, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.99- 8.01 (m, 1 H, Ar-H); 3'P NMR: (162MHz, CD30D) 8p 17.3; 13C NMR: (100 MHz, DMSO-

d6) 6c 18.8,21.1 (d, J = 11.5), 31.1 (d, J = 5), 59.0 (d, J = 149.5), 132.2, 156.4. <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Example 65 : [Phenyl- (thiophene-2-sulfonylamino)-naethylJ-phosphonic acid mono- (2-<BR> <BR> <BR> chloropyridin-3-yl) ester ammonium salt (60) Following the same procedure as described in Example 63, but substituting the phosphonic acid derived from Example 62 for phosphonic acid (xiii), the title compound was obtained. The mono ester 60 was isolated as a colorless solid (50% yield):'H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 8H 4.49 (d, J = 22 Hz, 1 H, NCHP), 6.80 (dd, J = 4,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 6.99- 7.07 (m, 3 H, Ar-H), 7.20-7.33 (m, 9 H), 7.58 (dd, J = 1.5,5 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.84 (dd, J = 1.5,8 Hz, 1 H, Ar-H), 7.94 (dd, J = 1.5,5 Hz 1 H, Ar-H); 31P NMR: (162MHz, DMSO-D6) 6p 10.7;'3C NMR: (100 MHz, DMSO-d6) 8c 58.3 (d, J = 140.5), 124.3,127.0,127.9,128.1, 129.1 (d, J = 5), 132.6,138.8,142.5,142.9,143.5,148.0.

[(2-Benzothiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino)-methyl]-phospho nicacidExample66: mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt. (142) 0 0 -OMe CS2CO3 s-OMe II N II iOMe 0 Mel, DMF s M, e 0 Me3SiBr (xiv) CH2CI2 0 NH4 0 p _ NH4 O Sl 1,, 0 CC13CN S-,-OH o p \/""NOpynd) ne \/ N02 pyridine 142 N02 2. NH40H (xv) Step 1 : [ (2-Benzothiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino)-methyll-phosphonic acid dimethyl ester (xiv).

A reaction mixture consisting of 290 mg (0.83 mmol) of [ (2- benzothiophenesulfonylamino)-methyl]-phosphonic acid dimethyl ester, 380 mg (1.16 mmol) of anhydrous cesium carbonate, 0.11 mL (1.16 mmol) of methyl iodide and 5 mL of anhydrous DMF stirred for 16 hours at room temperature. After the reaction was complete,

DMF was evaporated in vacuum, and the residue was suspended in 15 mL of water and extracted with dichloromethane. The extract was dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate, filtered and evaporated, providing an oily residue which was chromatographed on a silica gel column, eluent EtOAc/hexane (7: 3), then dichloromethane/MeOH (20: 1), to yield the title compound as a yellowish oil (190 mg, 63%):'H NMR: (300 MHz, CDCI3) 6 3.00 (s, CH3), 3.48 (d, J = 11.5 Hz, 2 H), 3.83 (d, J = 10.9 Hz, 6 H, 2CH3), 7.45-7.50 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.83- 7.89 (m, 3 H, Ar-H).

Step 2 f (2-Benzothiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino)-methyll-phosphonic acid (xv) To a solution of 550 mg (1.58 mmol) of the compound (xiv) in 10 mL of anhydrous dichloromethane at 0 °C, 0.49 mL of bromotrimethylsilane was added. The mixture was warmed up to room temperature and left overnight. Dichloromethane was evaporated; the oily residue was dissolved in another 10 mL of dichloromethane, filtered, again evaporated and redissolved in 10 mL of MeOH. The methanolic solution stirred at room temperature 30 min., evaporated and the residue was triturated with a mixture ether/hexane to form a white crystalline product which was separated by filtration (390 mg, 70%): 1H NMR: (300 MHz, DMSO-D6) 8H 2.88 (s, CH3), 3.21 (d, J = 12.1 Hz, 2 H), 7.49-7.61 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 8.01-8.17 (m, 3 H, Ar-H).

Step 3 : [(2-Benzothiophenesulfonyl-N-methylamino)-methyll-phosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (142) A reaction mixture consisting of 500 mg (1.56 mmol) of (xv), 265mg (1.90 mmol) of p-nitrophenol, 1.1 mL (11 mmol) of trichloroacetonitrile, and 5 mL of anhydrous pyridine was stirred in a sealed tube for 5 hours at 105-110 °C. After the reaction was complete, pyridine was evaporated in vacuum, the oily residue was chromatographed on a silica gel column, eluent chloroform/MeOH/ammonium hydroxide (9: 2: 0.1) to yield 620 mg (87%) of the title compound as a pale crystalline substance:'H NMR: (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) 8H 2.89 (s, CH3), 3.07 (d, J = 11.5 Hz, 2 H), 7.15 (br s, 4 H, NH4), 7.37 (d, J = 9. 3 Hz, 2 H, Ar-H), 7.47-7.57 (m, 2 H, Ar-H), 8.01-8.14 (m, 5 H, Ar-H). <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <P>Exaniple 67. [ (2-Benzothiophenesulfonyl-N-etiiylanzino)-niethyll-phosphoni c acid nzono-<BR> <BR> <BR> (4nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (144) The title compound was prepared in 62% yield following the procedure from Example 66, steps 1-3, but using ethyl iodide as the alkylating agent: IH NMR: (300 MHz, DMSO-d6)

8H 1.00 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, CH3), 3.33 (d, J = 11.1 Hz, PCH2), 3.49 (q, J = 7.1 Hz), 6.95-7.51 (m, 8 H, Ar-H, NH4), 7.98-8.10 (m, 5 H, Ar-H).

Example 68: (2-Benzothiophenesulfonyl-N-benzylanaino)-methyl]-phosphonic acid mono- (4nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (145).

The title compound was prepared in 58% yield following the procedure from Example 66, steps 1-3 but using benzyl bromide as the alkylating agent:'H NMR: (300 MHz, DMSO- d6) 6H 3.29 (d, J = 10.0 Hz, PCH2), 4.78 (s, CH2Ph), 7.16-7.47 (m, 13 H, Ar-H, NH4), 7.96- 8.00 (m, 4 H, Ar-H), 8.07 (s, 1 H, Ar-H) <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> Example 69 : [ (2-Benzothiophenesulfonyl-N-phenylethylamino)-methylJ-phosph onic acid<BR> <BR> <BR> mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (143) The title compound was prepared in 55% following the procedure from Example 66, steps 1-3, but using 2-bromoethyl benzene as the alkylating agent : 1H NMR: (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) AH 2.86 (dd, J = 8.4, Hz, NCH2), 3.43 (d, J = 11.2 Hz, PCH2), 3.58 (dd, J = 8.5 Hz, CH2Ph), 7.13-7.56 (m, 13 H, Ar-H, NH4), 7.96-8.10 (m, 5 H, Ar-H).

Example 70 : (5, 8-dichlorobenzothiophene-2-sulfonyl) aminoniethylphosphonic acid mono- (4-nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (128).

Step 1: 2 2-Diethoxyethyl 25-dichlorophenyl suLtide (xvi).

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, to 2,5-dichlorobenzenethiol (25 g, 139 mmol) in 140 mL of acetone in a 250-mL round-bottomed flask was added 21 g (154 mmol) of potassium carbonate, followed by 22 mL (146 mmol) of diethyl acetal. The mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature and then filtered, washing the collected solid with acetone, and the filtrate was concentrated. Water was added to the concentrated filtrate, and the aqueous phase was extracted three times with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with 0.5 M KOH, water and brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated. The title compound was obtained as a yellow oil (37 g, 90%):'H NMR (300 MHz, CDC13) 8H 7.36 (d, j = 2.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.26 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.06 (dd, J = 4 Hz, 1 H), 4.71 (t, J = 5.4 Hz, 1 H), 3.71 (quintuplet, J = 7.2 Hz, 2 H), 3.57 (quintuplet, J = 6.9 Hz, 2 H), 3.14 (d, J=5. 4Hz, 2H), 1.22 (t, J=7. 2Hz, 6H).

Step 2: 5.8-Dichlorobenzothiophene (xvii).

Anhydrous chlorobenzene (250 mL) was placed in a 500-mL three-necked flask equipped with a condenser, an addition funnel, and a magnetic stirring bar. The apparatus was flushed with nitrogen, and polyphosphoric acid (40g) was added. The mixture was heated at 125 °C, and 2,2-diethoxyethyl 2,5-dichlorophenyl sulfide (24 g, 82 mmol) in 25 mL of chlorobenzene was added over one hour. The resultant mixture was allowed to sir overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, and the organic phase was separated from polyphosphoric acid. Residual polyphosporic acid was decomposed with water, and the resultant aqueous phase was washed twice with chloroform. The combined organic phases were dried over magnesium sulfate and concentrated. The crude product was purified by flash chromatography, eluting with a mixture of 5% ethyl acetate: 95% hexane to give 1.5 g (99%) of 5,8-dichlorobenzothiophene as a light yellow solid: H NMR (300 MHz, CDC13) SH 7.57 (d, J = 5.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.53 (d, J = 5.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.32 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.27 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, I H).

Step 3: 5,8-Dichlorobenzothiophene-2-sulfonamide (xviii).

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, to 5,8-dichlorobenzothiophene (6.58 g, 32 mmol) in 50 mL of THF at-78 °C in a 250-mL round-bottomed flask was slowly added a 2.5 M solution of n-butyllithium in pentane (16 mL, 40 mmol). After 30 minutes, sulfur dioxide gas was bubbled over the solution until the mixture became acidic. Hexane was added, and the mixture was warmed to room temperature. The sulfinic salt was collected by filtration and dried overnight under high vacuum.

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, to the sulfinic salt (8.88 g, 32 mmol) in 60 mL of dichloromethane at 0 °C in a 250-mL round-bottomed tlask was added N-chloro-succinimide (6.29 g, 47 mmol). After 15 minutes, the mixture was warmed to room temperature over 45 minutes. The suspension was filtered over Celite, and the filtrate was concentrated to give 9.65 g (100%) of the corresponding sulfonyl chloride. This material was dissolved in 50 mL of acetone and cooled to 0 °C, and 10 mL of ammonium hydroxide was added. After 15 minutes, the mixture was warmed to room temperature over 45 minutes, and the solvents were evaporated. The residue was dissolved in water and extracted three times with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated. The title compound was obtianed as a white solid (6.45 g, 70%): 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDC13) bl-l 8.09 (s, 1 H), 7.41 (s, 2 H).

Step 4: (5,8-dichlorobenzothiophene-2-sulfonyl) aminomethylphosphonic acid mono- (4- nitrophenyl) ester ammonium salt (128).

Compound 128 was prepared by procedures analogous to those described in Example 46, steps 2 and 3, and Example 1, step 4:'H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) 8n 7.94 (s, 1 H), 7.92 (d, J = 9.3 Hz, 2 H), 7.57-7.65 (m, 2 H), 7.21-7.38 (m, 4 H), 7.22 (d, J-=9.3 Hz, 2 H), 2.96 (d, J = 12.9 Hz, 2 H).

Example 71: Determination of ICss Enzyme activity against the commercially available substrate, nitrocefin, was <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> measured in the presence of various inhibitor concentrations. The P99 P-lactamase enzyme ( 1 mg/mL) was dissolved in 20 mM MOPS buffer at pH 7.50, and diluted 200-fold in the same buffer containing 0.1% BSA. Nitrocefin was stored as a 100 uM stock solution in 20 mM MOPS at pH 7.5. Stock solutions of test compounds were prepared in 10 mM MOPS at pH 7.5 (approximately 1 mg/mL).

A typical assay contained 300 pL of 100 pM nitrocefin, x µL of inhibitor test compound, 110-xL of MOPS, and 10 uL of P99 P-lactamase. The reaction at 25°C was followed spectrophotometrically at 482 nm. ICso values were determined from the dose- response plots of the initial rates vs. inhibitor concentration.

TEM R+ and L-1 ß-lactamases were assayed as described above for P99 p-lactamase.

Representative results using the test inhibitors of the invention showing the inhibition of P-lactamases are shown in Tables 1 and 2.

DeterminationofantibioticMinimumInhibitoryConcentration(M IC0inExample72: the Presence and Absence ofLactanzase Inhibitor.

Principe An increasing number of organisms produce enzymes that inhibit the actions of (3- lactam antibiotics, so-called P-lactamases. The"strength"of p-lactam antibiotics can be improved by pairing them with compounds that inhibit bacterial enzyme P-lactamases. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) test determines the lowest concentration of an antibiotic at which no visible bacterial growth occurs. This test permits comparisons to be made between bacterial growth in the presence of antibiotic alone (control) and bacterial growth in the presence of both an antibiotic and a novel (test) compound.

Materials required P-lactamase positive strains P-lactam anitibiotics P-lactamase inhibitor compounds appropriate bacterial growth medium ß-Lactamase positive strains Klebsiella oxytoca [ATCC#51983] Staphylococcus aureus [MGH: MA#50848] Enterococcus faecalis [ATCC#49757] Enterobacter cloacae [ATCC#23355] Haemophilus influenzae [ATCC&num 43163] ß-Lactam antibiotics Piperacillin 333 mg/mL TAZOCINTM (piperacillin + tazobactam) 308 mg/mL Ticarcillin 500 mg/mL TIMENTINTM (ticarcillin + clavulanic acid) 500 mg/mL Cefoxitin 333 mg/mL Ceftriaxone 250 mg/mL Preparation: Dissolved in MHB (Mueller Hinth Broth) Working dilutions: 0.06 mg/mL to 4.22 mg/mL ß-Lactamase inhibitor compounds (test compounds) Preparation : Dissolved in MHB or DMSO Stockmg/mL2 Working g concentration: 1, 10,100 pg/mL Culture media MHB: Mueller Hinth Broth

HTM: Haemophilus Test Medium Broth origin: Becton Dickinson storage: 4 °C Blood agar (prepared general culture plate) Chocolate agar (prepared plate + accessory factors, required by H inflenzae) <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> origin. Oxoid<BR> <BR> <BR> storage : 4°C Assay Procedure Frozen bacterial stocks were thawed to room temperature, and a few drops were placed on an appropriate plate; chocolate agar was used for H. influenzae, blood agar was used for all others. The plates were incubated overnight at 37 °C in air, except for H. influenzae, which was incubated in a CO2 incubator. The cultures were subcultured the following day, and the subcultures were again incubated overnight.

A sterile loop was touched to 3 colonies and used to inoculate 1 mL of Mueller- Hinton Broth (MHB). The bacterial solution was diluted 18.8-fold (20 uL of bacterial solution in 355 VL of broth). 5 uL of the resultant inoculum solution contained-4 x 104 CFU/mL. Confirmation of the inoculum was performed by preparing a serial dilution to give 100 uL of a 5000-fold dilution, all of which was then plated onto an appropriate plate. After incubation overnight at 37 °C, the plate had 75-150 colonies.

In each well of a 96-well microtiter plate was combined 5 uL of bacterial inoculum, 90 uL of antibiotic dilutions, and 5 uL of test compound (or media for determination of the MIC of the antibiotic in the absence of test compound). Each plate included 2 wells with no bacterial inoculum (negative control) and 2 wells with no test compound and no antibiotic (positive control). The plate was covered and incubated with gentle shaking for 16-20 hours at 37 °C in air (C02 lor H. iuenzae). Absorbance was read at 540 nm (Multiskan Titertek mcc/340). Bacterial growth was scored as follows: invisible to the naked eye (OD < 0. 05) NEGATIVE barely visible (OD > 0.05, but < 50% of positive control PLUS/MINUS readily visible (typically OD > 0.10) PLUS abundant growth (OD > 0.3) PLUS-PLUS The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), defined to be the lowest dilution of antibiotic that completely inhibits growth, was determined for the antibiotic alone and for antibiotic in the presence of each test compound. In some cases, the determination of MIC in the presence of test compound was performed at more than one concentration of the test compound.

Representative data is presented in Tables 1 and 2. The impact of the novel ß- lactamase inhibitors is expressed as the ratio of the MIC determined in the absence of P- lactamase inhibitor to the MIC determined in the presence of the specified concentration of the P-lactamase inhibitor test compound. A value of 1 indicates that the p-lactamase inhibitor had no effect on antibiotic potency, while a positive integer indicates that the (3- lactamase inhibitor produces a synergistic effect when co-administered with an antibiotic agent, that is, a higher concentration of antibiotic is required to completely inhibit visible bacterial growth in the absence of the test compound than in its presence.

Table 1: (3-Lactamase Inhibition and Microbiological Efficacy of Sulfonamidomethylphosphonate Derivatives. Ail(0) 2 R3 ) oh 1"IR ICso Synergy Cpd. R R3 R4 Lo P J (M) (at/mL) Class C Class A ."1 E. CI3 H. In. St. A. 10/14 10/15 10 1 PNP6 162 1/1 (1) (1) PNP 16 24 2 3 ci H PNP 5 2/1 (1). (1) PNP 2 2/1 (1) (1) 5 meo H PNP 4 2/1 (1) (1) ''Class [P99].ß-lactamase 2 Expressed as the ratio of the antibiotic MIC determined in the absence of ß-lactamase inhibitor to the antibiotic MIC determined in the presence of p-lactamase inhibitor.

3 E. Cl = Enterobacter cloacae [ATCC &num 23355]; H. In. = Haemophilius influenza [ATCC &num 43163] ; St. A. = [MGH:MA#50848].Staphylococcusaureus 'The first value provided was determined at an inhibitor concentration of 10 µg/mL, and the second value was determined at an inhibitor concentration of I"g/mL. Where only one value is provided, it was determined at an inhibitor concentration of 10 Hg/mL.

5 Values within parentheses were determined at an inhibitor concentration of 100 µg/mL.

=p-ntirophenol6PNP 6 113C H PNP 7 2/1 (1) (1) 7 H PNP 4 4/2 (16) (2) J 8 H o >100 2/1 1 (1) 9 H PNP 5 4/2 32 2 ci 10 H PNP 6 2/1 16 4 11 F \/-H/>100 1/1 8 1 NEZ 12 »/3 H F 10 1/1 8 1 12 PNP 13 H PNP 6 4/1 8 1 NOS CL 14 H PNP 3 4/2 (8) (2) ci ci 15 H PNP 18 3/1 4 1 S 16) 4 H PNP 19 1/1 8 1 17 CF H PNP 9 2/1 8 2 18 H PNP 4 4/1 8 0, N 19 H PNP 43 4/4 (4) t ( 20 H, C v H F 8/8 (16). (1) CH, _-_ _ 21 H PNP 4 2/1 (2) ; (1) tri C H 22 H PNP 7 2/1 16 4 0 N Br 23 H PNP 14 1/1 2 1 24 \1 H PNP 119 4/1 8 1 " 25 H u (g 1,200 po F 26 1,200 16/2 1 1 ° \/ s 27 H PNP 5.0 1/1 4 2 28 H 1, 800 s F 28 H o-1,800 S F 29 X H F 972 S 30 [A o-622 8/2 1 1 cl Cl 31 H PNP 136 8/2 2 1 su 32 H 0 639 16/2 1 1 Zona Ci 33 H 33 H PNP 5 8/4 4 4 34 H OH 1600 2/2 1 1 ZONA 35 H OCH3 diester l 36 <) H °- 410 2/2 1 1 ion ci 37 2000 4/2 1 1 \/ 38 H 362 8/4 1 1 ru cl 39 H PNP 7 1/1 8 4 \/\/ 40 356 211 4 2 H ce H-EPNP 5 2/1 8 4 S j 42 H 0 59 8/1 ce 43 H OH S 44 192 2/2 s 45 H H 3500 2/1 1 1 S V-. °\--/SS S ci PNP 276 2 1 N-Me N mye 48 6 H ? X 189 4/2 1 1 ce 49 H 3000 1/1 1 1 s 0-6 50 H 3000 2/1 1 1 S o 51 H OMe 1700 2/1 1 1 S Me mye 52 PNP 1400 4/2 1 1 S : 53 PNP 363 2/2 S \=/ 54 1800 2/1 1 1 N cl 55 H H p 3600 4/1 2 2 | J 56 1100 8/1 2 g ce 57 H PNP 77 4/1 8 2 S 58 H OH 1,200 2/1 1 1 Br S 472 /,- ce 61 H ci 3,500 2/1 1 1 s 62 PNP 44 2/1 S 63 40 2/1 Cl 64 PNP 0.56 84 2/2 < s 6-5 PNP 0.86 365 1 s 0 ci cri s 67 0.16 20 1 cl 68 < X 0< ?-O 84 52 ci F 69 (H tr 28 4/2 16 2 s 70 y H 93 2/2 1 ce ci 71 Bl <t H. ? 84 2/1 16 2 s H PNP 4 2' NMR 73/1 H OH 74 PNP 34 4/2 1 1 OU\ F 74 d H P N V 34 4/2 1 175 H 35 4/4 16 2 0--N02 ol\-b 76 H °\ SOS 4/2 1 1 o cr 77 H PNP 0. 4 12/3 24 6 O-S 7 In four separate tests, synergy values of 32,2,1, and I were obtaine.d The value of 32 is believed to be an outlyer. Nue, 3000 1/1 1 1 o-- 0 79 H 3000 2/1 1 S o 80 H OMe 1700 2/1 1 1 S 81 11 0. 23 53 411 1 1 S COBn F 81 H-0. 51 0. 1 8/8 32 2 NO S 83 H 0-1. 14 88 4/1 8 2 S H 0.64 10 2/2 1 ! 1 s cozBr, s CO, BN ci N 86 Xh H ot-0. 61 828 4/1 1 1 H, C s H, C 87 H PNP-0.51 7 1/1 16 2 0 88 H 1, 500 1/1 1 1 s-oye amide-ester 0 o 89 H amide S amide! _ 90 H PNP-0.99 6 1/1 32 4 ci ci 91 H PNP-0.62 5 4/2 32 2 92 QS H OH-1. 70 446 2 sadd acid ci 93 H PNP-0 71 9 4/2 4 1 H2 94 H 175 1 O_r\ 95 H o--C)-coMc-0.40 6 1/1 8 1 -S S 96 H-1. 06 18 2/1 2 1 0-cil Cri 97 PNP-0. 69 2 8 cyme COpMe H o-0. 55 39 1/1 2 1 0__b S 99 H 0.42 3 4/2 < S 100 mn-X H PN M-0 31 0.4 5/2 s 101 MeOt H oS-0.91 16 9/1 S ci N 102 t/\ H PNP-1.23 12 22/2 l us 103 t H PNP 1.33 52 4/1 < 0 104 H PNP-1.23 5 11/2 _ Me- 105 < H OH-0.68 83 8 o Mono-acid Mono-sodium satt p 106 H 0. 47 0.4 2/1 < -0 NO, 0z 107 0.38 46 8/1 X colon 108 H o-Q-0. 8, 5 234 4/2 < cor 109 H 0 0, Bn 0.45 9 4/1 _ o 110 H 0-2. 10 83 4/2 4 -C 111 H 4-0. 58 3 4 4 s cl 112 N-0.35 60 16 ° \/ S 113 \ H o-O-0.24 19 8 MHB S 114 H PNP-0. 055 0.3 6 s 115 H a-0. 46 116 16 ci 116/\ H o-0. 41 48 4 H CL 117 H PNP-0.015 0.4 4 ; Oh S 118 Ph> H PNP-0 31 0.3 4 pu \gaz 119 H PNP 0.42 1 4 L N I SO Ph 120 (9 ~ Cl PNP-1 15 1, 000 4 121 H C PNP-0.73 4,000 8 . 122-1. 08 11 2 Phs r-m CRI 123 PNP-0.19 101 4 cl c__,,, 124 PNP-0.22 242 4 < ci 125 PNP 0.065 223 2 126 PNP-1.01 244 4 \ YN 127 7 H 0. 61 s 128 H PNP 0. 45 0. 1 16 I s m 129 0--0. 85 4992 I N/''' C-I 130 C--0.1,400 4 SJcT ce 131 _ H o ß-0.65 29 2 Ph S O i, 132 H-0. 70 0.4 4 s \/oo, a 133 H PNP t 4 t os\ ci ci 134 H N-1.08 196 4 i S ° \/ 135 H ° 0. 48 6 \/oc, su I 136 0.095 358 4 136 137 H-0. 52 593 4 orme 138 H o-P 755 2 s Me0 139 > H (OBn) 2 1 s Diester l. -0. 11 4 2 X brine 141 1 > H vCO, E |-0.78 655 4 . 142 H PNP-0. 091 1.3K 2 N-Me pop 1.17 133 4 s phenethyl PNP-0. 036 463 4 N-Et pop 0.86 94 4 N-benzyl H 146 s H o 9-0.30 2,500 1 -cip N Me CF, 147 I 20011, N Me N-Me 148 H 0.13 505 2 o-b FC H-0. 1 972 1 _ s 150 0. 65 765 s N-Me 151 H 0.23 < s 152 H 96 4 < 153 H PNP 0.17 0.2 16 Br 154 PNP 0.62 11 4 N Me 155 H PNP-0. 09 2. 0 4 CRI 156 H-N-0. 28 32 2 N b ou 157 _N-0. 51 432 1 _ ot-N s pop 0. 13 213 1 SU\ 159 Ph PNP-0.25 71 1 S ci -0. 69 219 1 cri S ci 161 N-0.72 140 1 _ o CL 162 I -N 028 213 1 _ °. \/ a 163-1.30 497 ! 164 H PNP-0.01 0. 31 6 _ ci C, 165 0.71 18 2 N-Me 166 H 2,800 1 _ 167 () t1 H PNP 0.53 2 2 X cri 168 H 0. 92 1 \/ 169 (\-, S H'o)-0 07 140 1 (/S \/ 170 > H o Ph 0. 70 ? 67 1 /s o \/o Me0 171 0.49 214 1 Me0 Me0 OMe 172 H-0.54 1.9K 1 _ s MeO 173 I j \ H o \-0. 14 408 1 < s F met 174 lu-0.41 829 1 ci Me0 175 H-0. 69 9 1 -NO, cri 176 H-0. 31 972 1 0 oye 177 H 0 H, 618 s 178 H 0. 21 185 bu CI 179 6N-1. 10 46 vs 180 \> H PNP-0. 90 1.4 < os OMe 181 I 1. 9K s o \/ 182 H 0-NHAE-0.98 1.6K 1 s -' 183 X H o @ Me 0.34 205 1 0 mye C ! Mye 184 X H PNP-0.33 0.5 32 cul OMe 185 H H oE-0 06 5 - ci ci 186 S1} H PNP 0.67 0.2 X M, oi Me OMe s o Mu CI 188 H o 189 H 62 2 I w fll I w 0 "' Table 2: p-Lactamase Inhibition and Microbiological Efficacy of Derivative.s Cpd. R'R3 R'Log P ICso ICso ICso Synergys (pM) (M) (pM) t4C9 244A 93 44B"4 Clashs C Ex, 6 10/lez 190? H PNP 0.58 0.7 >200 >200 8/16 I s 191L OH 0.78 84 >200 >200 0 192 ol NO, OH 0.58 128 >200 >200 0 193 H PNP 0.55 4 >200 >200 4 s 194 (sS H cS 0.37 648 >200 >200 0 0 ß-lacrtamase[P99].2ClassC 3 Class A P-lactamase [TEM R+].

4 Class B p-lactamase [L-1].

5 Expressed as the ratio of the antibiotic MIC determined in the absence of ß-lactamase inhibitor to the antibiotic MIC determined in the presence of P-lactamase inhibitor.

6 E. Cl = Enterobacter cloacae [ATCC &num 23355] : H. In. = Haemophilius influenzae [ATCC &num 43163]; St. A. = Staphylococcus aureus [MGH: MA &num 50848].

7The first value provided was determined at an inhibitor concentration of 10 pg/mL, and the second value was determined at an inhibitor concentration of 1g/mL. Where only one value is provided, it was determined at an inhibitor concentration of 10 µg/mL. 195 Br H PNP 0.03 0.6 >200 >200 2 s 196 N H PNP 0.60 0.8 >200 >200 4 Et0 S 197 N H N 0.64 106 >200 2 0., U' ci 198 H 0. 66 3 >200 >200 8 s 199 QyH o-0-ococH, 0.72 25 >200 >200 0 's 200 N-N CH3 PNP 0.87 1200 >200 >200 2 C3 201 IC--H oV-CN"200 >200 8 s 202 \, H X 594 >200 >200 0 s N\ 203 H 361 >200 >200 0 s o 204 [jl P 87 >200 >200 0 o/\ o 205 H a 334 >200 >200 8 'S o ci N 206 D H PNP 0.85 0.1 467 >200 4 Mu0 207 H PNP 1 275 >200 2 MoOrNH OXO OMe OMe 208-0 H PNP 0.56 3 >200 >200 4 I s 209 > H 0<3Br 0. 10 142 >200 >200 2 s, 210? I H 0.30 23 149 >200 0 L a ci 211 H 50 >200 0 s NHPH 212 ci H NHPh 1. 0 9 64 201 0 IP ci CI 213 ci H OeNHSO2Ph 50 14 >200 0 I ci ci 214 cl H PNP 0.2 87 >200 16 ci C) 215 S02NHPh 93 494 0 s 216 H 196 >200 >200 0 S O CH2CH20CH3 217 H 367 >200 >200 218 H o o 356 >200 >200 's N Oh Ph 219 H 0-aCH2CN 619 >200 >200 0 s 220 _ H ° {f t 48 >200 >200 0 oh 221 ci H PNP 0.5 >200 >200 8 RIZ cri ci 222 N H PNP 7 >200 >200 4 s 223 ci H o 9 278 >200 0 \NHBn cri 224 c'PHs PNP 183 >200 >200 0 'cl3 cri 225 (YY-H o- (j-cH, coNH, 1400 >200 0 226 H 0 F 0. 3 576 16 s'lacs s CN 227 ci H 2 ci IN ci 228 H c\ 98 >200 2 s 229 cl H PNP 0.9 X X X s CN ce N 231 H 0 O-N 165 >200 >200 s 232 ci H CtCN 0.2 250 >200 16 crv 233 H 0 205 >200 >200 0 s 0 234! H 219 >200 >200 0 nome 0 235 m H L s >200 8 s N02 236 0 578 >200 >200 s I o 237 H 0 O-N 0. 3 204 >200 >200 0 zizi ci CI 238 H-0.4 53 131 >200 0 s (NO. C ! CL 240 > H o o-N 0.1 458 >200 0 Br 241 > H mo 5 >200 >200 2 s-clyo"-a 0 242 FTY- °T ' 0 242 2 5 >200 >200 oJ. J 0 CO-"°iojo'°°°°' 0 244 S H ° \ 4 >200 >200 4 0 245 H-0. 1 43 272 0 ci nu '-NH CI NH 246 > H C N-0.1 623 >200 >200 2 0 IN 247 0.8 20 >200 8 -an02 N02 248 ci H 0.3 O. 0 103 32 ( FNO, Ci 249 fT\-H 0 14 >200 2 SPh 0 250 H 0 0.6 9 >200 2 /S i OPh 0 251 H-0.6 30 >200 0 s I i Nos 252 H OH 1300 >200 0 i S oo 0 253 H 0 F-0. 4 0. 2 68 16 -an02 NOp 254 ci o.CF3 0.3 13 32 S\ N02 ci 255 cl H 0 CF3 0.7 0.6 6 8 N0, ce 256 H 0' ()"rH 174 >200 0 /S i NCOZCH3 0 257 H O'ClrH 354 >200 0 /S i NvCOZCH3 bu 258 H 0 80 >200 0 zozo Ph 259 H 0, 1 177 >200 0 s Coach3 N 260 130 >200 0 Nu2 o 0 261 H 0' H 78 >200 N--OU 0 0 262 m H n H 165 >252 0 S N C02CH3 0 Ph H No, 263 81 >256 0 s o- 264 > H O@F 97 394 4 s, 265 0-0-o 93 359 4 's 266 H OICIYH 82 >244 0 s nô O i 267 ci H 0) 2 240 2 S\ 0 cri C ! 268 OMe H PNP-0.4 3 >240 2 6 269 OMe H 0 F3.-0.2 6 107 0 N02 S 270 N H 1 452 >200 16 S N 271 H PNP 0. 3 2 >200 2 c 272 OMe H 0 50 >200 2 Cri N 273 H 0, ( :)CF3 4 54 2 s 274 H 0 47 >200 2 C N 275 ci H o-CN 0.1 21 32/8 rvo2 ci 276 H 63 >200 4 s C02Et Cl., et 277 i H oX 139 >200 2 s 278 H 137 >200 2 . S, 0 I. F 279 H 109 >200 0 o "CN 280 ci H F 11 68 0 \/ s CRI CI 281 ci H F 4 75 4 v o s ci 282 ci H n 43 662 0 o ci ci 283 ci H o 20 74 0 s CN ci 284 c H F-0.3 0.4 511 8 OACN 285 H OaF-0.5 0.4 356 4 eos 286 H H gCN 2 >200 16/16 CN 287 ol H 15 >200 16/8 CN 288 W H XCI 375 >200 8/16 s'lu 289 N H 6 >200 32/32 fez 290 N H ton 27 >200 16/32 LCN 291 s H CFg 666 S'l--aNHCOCH3 -"NHCOCHs 292 N H gNHSO2 F3 >240 >240 0/0 NUS02 CH3 293 N cFg noo >300 0/0 NHCOPh 294 ci H °sOs 77 149 4 Cl NHCOPh cri 295 H H gNHS02 27 454 0/0 s NHS02 CH3 296 H o.cFa 98 >200 0/0 NHCOPh 297 s H gNHSO2Me >600 >200 0/0 NHSOZMe 298 ci H F O. OE 157 32 crv ci 299 Cl H Sue 2 150 8/8 s 300 ci H A 28 130 0/2 (S\ 0 ci C ! 301 ci H 4 74 4/4 S"aCH3 Cl 302 ci H °f9 3 141 0/2 Cl F4CF3 ci 303 (, 3-H nF 9 >200 2/2 s N02 N0, 304 H 16/32 S F i N02 SF-NO, 305 N H G AN 6 >200 8/4 CN 3 06 s H OocC F3 7 >200 2/4 N02 307 H m<F 4) >200 2/2 ruz 308 N H v 53 >200 0/0 s o 309 S CH3 OaCF3 109 >200 0/0 -N 1, H3 N02 310 CH3H 0 F3 0.7 19 8/8 N02 311 CH3 CH3 F 170 >200 0/0 Xi 3 con 312 S H OuCN 0.1 >200 16/8 S con 313 N H 27 >200 4/4 C-,

SynergisticEffectofß-LactamaseinhibitorsWhenTestedAgainstHi ghlyExample73: Resistant ALactamase Positive Bacterial strains Following procedures identical to those described in Example 72, P-lactamase inhibitors were tested for their ability to enhance antibiotic efficacy against ß-lactamase positive bacterial strains that are very highly resistant to P-lactam antibiotics. Representative results are presented in Table 3.

Highly resistant P-Lactamase positive strains Enterobacter cloacae (derepressed) Pseudomonas aeroginosa [ATCC&num 12470-resistant] Stenotrophomonas maltophilia [ATCC#12968-resistant] Pseudomonas aeroginosa [ATCC&num 98043010-intermediale resistance] Stenotrophomonas maltopilia [ATCC&num 98043029-intermediate resistance] Successful inhibition of bacterial p-lactamase activity in these assays is expected to be predictive of success in animals and humans. For examples of the successful clinical development of p-lactamase inhibitors identified by in vitro testing, see, e. g., Di Modugno et al., Current Opinion in Anti-Infective Investigational Drugs 1: 26-39 (1999); Moellering, J.

Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 31 Suppl. A : 1-8 (1993).

Table 3. Synergy results from scrreening against highly resistant microorganisms. Cpd.Resistant Resistant Resistant Intermed. Intermed. C d. IC50 Ent. Cloacae2 Pseudo. Stenotro. Pseudo. Stenofro. H ru 0 RR5 pg/mL pg/mL pg/mL jig/mL pg/mL pg/mL pg/mL pg/mL gg/ML pg/mL F 15 H PNP 18 1 1 1 4 1 J 77 H PNP 0.4 5 1 5 8 1 0 -S- 'lez NMe2 76 H ci 502 51 5 1 1 o O 1 Class C ß-lactamase [P99].<BR> <P>2 Enterobacter Cloacae (derepressed), Pseudomons aeroginosa (&num 12470-resistant), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (&num 1:<BR> aeroginosa (&num 98043010-intermediate resistawnce0, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (&num 98043029-intermediate resistance0. I a 1d H B NO m | 5 1 482 H F,N02 0. 1 5 1 5 8 1 i i 114 ? H PNP 0. 3 5 1 4 1 1 ci '-s' 128 ci H PNP 0. 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 \N, , do,