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Title:
SHARED POWER STREET SWEEPER
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2013/163091
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A power delivery system for a vehicle is disclosed. In one embodiment, the power delivery system includes a chassis engine configured to power driving functions of the vehicle and an auxiliary engine configured to power non-driving hydraulic functions of the vehicle. The power delivery system may also include a power boost system comprising a hydraulic pump and a hydraulic motor in fluid communication with each other. The hydraulic pump may be coupled to a power output of the chassis engine while the hydraulic motor may be coupled to a power output of the auxiliary engine. In one embodiment, the power delivery system has a power sharing mode in which power is transferred from the chassis engine power output to the auxiliary engine power output via the hydraulic pump and motor such that the non-driving hydraulic functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

Inventors:
BURNIER TIMOTHY A (US)
PADGETT JOHN D (US)
Application Number:
US2013/037605
Publication Date:
October 31, 2013
Filing Date:
April 22, 2013
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
FED SIGNAL CORP (US)
International Classes:
B60K17/10; B60K5/08; B60K17/28; E01H1/05
Foreign References:
EP0742118A11996-11-13
DE102009028056A12010-02-18
US20050155170A12005-07-21
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BRUESS, Steven, C. (P.O. Box 2903Minneapolis, MN, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
is claimed is:

A power delivery system for a vehicle, the power delivery system comprising:

(a) a chassis engine configured to power driving functions of the vehicle;

(b) an auxiliary engine configured to power non-driving functions of the vehicle; and

(c) a power boost system comprising:

i. a first power transmission device coupled to a power output of the chassis engine;

ii. a second power transmission device in power communication with the first power transmission device, the second power transmission device being coupled to a power output of the auxiliary engine;

(d) the power delivery system having a first power sharing mode in which power is transferred from the chassis engine power output to the auxiliary engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the non-driving functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

The power delivery system of claim 1, wherein the power delivery system has a second power sharing mode in which power is transferred from the auxiliary engine power output to the chassis engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the driving functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

The power delivery system of claim 1, wherein the first and second power transmission devices are hydraulic devices.

The power delivery system of claim 3, wherein the first power transmission device is a hydraulic pump and the second power transmission device is a hydraulic motor.

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5. The power delivery system of claim 3, wherein each of the first and second power transmission devices are configured to operate as a hydraulic motor and a hydraulic pump.

6. The power delivery system of claim 1, wherein the chassis engine power output is a power take-off unit.

7. The power delivery system of claim 6, wherein the chassis engine power take-off unit is connected to a transmission driven by the chassis engine.

8. The power delivery system of claim 7, wherein the chassis engine power take-off unit includes a clutch. 9. The power delivery system of claim 8, wherein the auxiliary engine power

output is a power take-off unit.

10. The power delivery system of claim 9, wherein the auxiliary engine power takeoff unit is connected to the auxiliary engine.

11. The power delivery system of claim 1, wherein the power boost system further comprises an energy storage device for storing energy developed during vehicle braking. 12. The power delivery system of claim 11, wherein the energy storage device is an accumulator.

13. The power delivery system of claim 1, wherein the power delivery system

further includes a non-power sharing mode wherein power from the chassis engine is prevented from being transferred to the auxiliary engine.

14. The power delivery system of claim 1, wherein the first and second power

transmission devices are pneumatic devices.

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15. The power delivery system of claim 1, wherein the first and second power transmission devices are electric devices.

16. A street sweeping vehicle, the vehicle comprising:

(a) a vehicle chassis;

(b) a chassis engine supported by the vehicle chassis, the chassis engine being configured to power driving functions of the vehicle;

(c) an auxiliary engine supported by the vehicle chassis, the auxiliary engine being configured to power at least one powered non-driving function; and

(d) a power boost system comprising:

i. a first power transmission device coupled to a power output of the chassis engine;

ii. a second power transmission device in power communication with the first power transmission device, the second power transmission device being coupled to a power output of the auxiliary engine;

(e) the street sweeping vehicle having a first power sharing mode in which power is transferred from the chassis engine power output to the auxiliary engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the non-driving functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

17. The street sweeping vehicle of claim 16, wherein the street sweeping vehicle has a second power sharing mode in which power is transferred from the auxiliary engine power output to the chassis engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the driving functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

18. The street sweeping vehicle of claim 16, wherein the first and second power transmission devices are hydraulic devices.

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19. The street sweeping vehicle of claim 16, wherein the first power transmission device is a hydraulic pump and the second power transmission device is a hydraulic motor.

20. The street sweeping vehicle of claim 16, wherein each of the first and second power transmission devices are configured to operate as a hydraulic motor and a hydraulic pump. 21. The street sweeping vehicle of claim 20, wherein the at least one non-driving function powered by the auxiliary engine is a hydraulically powered function.

22. The street sweeping vehicle of claim 18, wherein the at least one non-driving function powered by the auxiliary engine one or more of a broom and a fan.

23. The power delivery system of claim 18, wherein the power delivery system further includes a non-power sharing mode wherein power from the chassis engine is prevented from being transferred to the auxiliary engine. 24. The power delivery system of claim 18, wherein the maximum output capacity of the auxiliary engine is less than the maximum input power requirements for the at least one powered non-driving function.

25. A method for powering at least one non-driving function of a vehicle with a chassis engine and an auxiliary engine, the method including:

(a) providing a first power transmission device and a second power

transmission device;

(b) coupling a first power transmission device to a power output of the chassis engine;

(c) coupling a second power transmission device to a power output of the auxiliary engine, the auxiliary engine being configured to power the at least one non-driving function;

14 IS

(d) placing the first and second power transmission devices in power

communication with each other; and

(e) transferring power from the chassis engine power output to the auxiliary engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the non-driving functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

26. The method for powering at least one non-driving function of a vehicle of claim 25, wherein the step of providing the first and second power transmission devices includes providing hydraulic devices.

27. The method for powering at least one non-driving function of a vehicle of claim 25, wherein the step of providing hydraulic devices includes providing a hydraulic motor and a hydraulic pump.

28. The method for powering at least one non-driving function of a vehicle of claim 25, further comprising the step of:

(a) transferring power from the auxiliary engine power output to the chassis engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the driving functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

29. The method for powering at least one non-driving function of a vehicle of claim

28, wherein the step of providing the first and second power transmission devices includes providing hydraulic devices.

30. The method for powering at least one non-driving function of a vehicle of claim

29, wherein the step of providing hydraulic devices includes providing a hydraulic piston-type device configured to operate as a hydraulic motor and a hydraulic pump.

Description:
SHARED POWER STREET SWEEPER

[0001] This application is being filed on 22 April 2013, as a PCT International patent application, and claims priority to U.S. Patent Application No. 13/453,793, filed April 23, 2012, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Street sweeping vehicles are often provided with an auxiliary engine in addition to the main chassis engine. The purpose of an auxiliary engine is to provide a dedicated power source to non-driving functions of the street sweeping vehicle. Examples of non-driving functions are broom operation, blower/fan operation, conveyor operation, and dumping of the hopper. In such arrangements, it is sometimes the case that the chassis engine will also be configured to separately provide power to non-driving functions as well. This allows for the auxiliary engine to be designed at a smaller maximum output capacity since less total load is placed on the auxiliary engine. However, this type of configuration can be disadvantageous in that a failure of the chassis engine system can prevent the operation of some or all of the non-driving functions. Additionally, energy normally lost to heat during braking and deceleration of the vehicle is generally not able to be recaptured in these types of systems. Improvements are desired. SUMMARY

[0003] A power delivery system for a vehicle, such as a street sweeper, is disclosed. In one embodiment, the power delivery system includes a chassis engine configured to power driving functions of the vehicle and an auxiliary engine configured to power non-driving functions of the vehicle. The power delivery system may also include a power boost system comprising a first and second power transmission device in power communication with each other. In one embodiment, the power transmission devices are a hydraulic pump and a hydraulic motor, respectively. The first power transmission device may be coupled to a power output

1 of the chassis engine while the second power transmission device may be coupled to a power output of the auxiliary engine. In one embodiment, the power delivery system has a power sharing mode in which power is transferred from the chassis engine power output to the auxiliary engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the non-driving functions of the vehicle are simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine.

[0004] A method for simultaneously powering at least one non-driving function of a vehicle with a chassis engine and an auxiliary engine is also disclosed. In one step of the method, a first power transmission device, such as a hydraulic pump, is coupled to a power output of the chassis engine. In another step of the method, a second power transmission device, such as a hydraulic motor, is coupled a power output of the auxiliary engine. The auxiliary engine may be configured to power at least one non-driving function. Another step in the method is placing the first and second power transmission devices in power communication with each other, such as with a hydraulic circuit. Yet another step is transferring power from the chassis engine power output to the auxiliary engine power output via the first and second power transmission devices such that the non-driving functions of the vehicle can be simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine. In one embodiment, the driving functions of the vehicle can be simultaneously powered by the chassis engine and the auxiliary engine in a second power sharing mode.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0005] Non-limiting and non-exhaustive embodiments are described with reference to the following figures, which are not necessarily drawn to scale, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the various views unless otherwise specified.

[0006] Figure 1 is a schematic view of a power delivery system having features that are examples of aspects in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure.

2 [0007] Figure 2 is a schematic view of alternative first power transmission device positions suitable for use in the power delivery system shown in Figure 1.

[0008] Figure 3 is a schematic view of alternative second power transmission device positions suitable for use in the power delivery system shown in Figure 1. [0009] Figure 4 is a schematic view of a power boost system suitable for use in the power delivery system shown in Figure 1.

[0010] Figure 5 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of a portion of the power delivery system shown in Figure 1, including a chassis engine.

[0011] Figure 6 is a close up perspective view of the system shown in Figure 5. [0012] Figure 7 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of a portion of the power delivery system shown in Figure 1, including an auxiliary engine.

[0013] Figure 8 is a close up perspective view of the system shown in Figure 7.

[0014] Figure 9 is an exploded perspective view of the power take off unit and hydraulic motor shown in Figures 7 and 8. [0015] Figure 10 is a side view of a street sweeping vehicle suitable for use with the power delivery system shown in Figure 1.

[0016] Figure 11 is a side view of the street sweeping vehicle shown in Figure 10 that is arranged such that the engines of the vehicle are exposed.

[0017] Figure 12 is a perspective view of a portion of a street sweeping vehicle and the power delivery system shown in Figure 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0018] Various embodiments will be described in detail with reference to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals represent like parts and assemblies throughout the several views. Reference to various embodiments does not limit the

3 scope of the claims attached hereto. Additionally, any examples set forth in this specification are not intended to be limiting and merely set forth some of the many possible embodiments for the appended claims.

[0019] Referring to Figure 1, a power delivery system 10 and a vehicle 20 is schematically shown. In one embodiment, the vehicle 20 is a street sweeping vehicle, such as that shown in Figures 10-12. As shown, the street sweeping vehicle 20 includes a chassis 22, wheels 24, brooms 26, vacuum nozzle 28, and a hopper 30. The power delivery system 10 includes a chassis power system 100, an auxiliary power system 200, and a power boost system 300. The chassis power system 100 is primarily responsible for providing power for the driving functions of the vehicle 20. Examples of driving functions that require power are the vehicle drive train, the steering system, and the braking system. The auxiliary power system 200 is primarily for providing power to auxiliary operations associated with the vehicle 20, for example hydraulic functions (not shown) can be driven by a hydraulic pump 212. Examples of auxiliary components that require power in a street sweeper application are fans/blowers, scarifying brooms, the hopper, and the conveyor.

[0020] In the embodiment shown, the chassis power system 100 includes an internal combustion engine 102 and a transmission 104 coupled to an output shaft (not shown) of the internal combustion engine 102. A power take-off (PTO) unit 106 is also shown as being mounted to the transmission 104. Figures 5 and 6 show an exemplary embodiment of the chassis power system 100 wherein a first power transmission device 302 is mounted to and driven by the PTO 106 which is in turn mounted to and driven by the transmission 104.

[0021] As shown, the auxiliary power system 200 includes an internal combustion engine 202. Auxiliary power system 200 is further shown as including a power take-off (PTO) unit 206 that provides power to a fan 208 via a belt drive system 210. Additionally, auxiliary power system 200 is shown as having an accessory power take off 212 driven by the engine 202 via a gear drive and/or belt drive system 214. Figures 7-9 show an exemplary embodiment of the auxiliary

4 power system 200 wherein a second power transmission device 304 (discussed below) is operably connected to the PTO 206 which is in turn mounted to and driven by the auxiliary engine 202. In the embodiment shown in Figures 7-9, device 304 is a hydraulic motor. As most easily seen at Figures 8 and 9, an adapter assembly 216, having a first adapter part 216a and a second adapter part 216b, is mounted between the PTO 206 and the hydraulic motor 304. A bracket assembly 218, having a horizontal extension 218b and a vertical extension 218a are provided to constrain the torque reaction of the device 304, where necessary.

[0022] Still referring to Figure 1, a hydraulic power boost system 300 is also shown. Power boost system 300 is for transferring power from the chassis power system 100 to the auxiliary power system 200. During some operations, the chassis engine 102 may be underutilized while the auxiliary engine 202 may be at peak capacity. In such instances, the power boost system 300 can transfer excess power available from the chassis engine 102 to the auxiliary engine 202. This configuration allows for the chassis engine 102 to simultaneously provide power to the driving functions of the vehicle and to the auxiliary engine 202, and for the engines 102, 202 to simultaneously power the non-driving functions of the vehicle 20. The power boost system 300 can also be configured to reclaim and deliver energy from the movement of the vehicle chassis 22 to the auxiliary power system 200 as well. For example, the power boost system 300 can transfer energy developed by braking, deceleration, or engine-braking the vehicle 20 to the auxiliary power system 200.

[0023] As shown, the power boost system 300 includes a first power transmission device 302 that is driven by a power output 150 of the chassis engine 102. The first power transmission device 302 is for transmitting power to a second power transmission device 304 via a power flow path 306. The second power transmission device 304 is for providing power to an output 250 of the auxiliary engine 202. Accordingly, the first and second power transmission devices 302, 304 operate together to transfer power from the output 150 of the chassis engine 102 to the output 250 of the auxiliary engine 202. Additionally, the first and second power transmission devices 302, 304 can be configured to transfer power in the opposite

5 direction from the auxiliary engine output 205 to the chassis engine output 150. In one embodiment devices 302 and 304 are a hydraulic pump 302 and motor 304, respectively, in fluid communication with each other via a hydraulic circuit 306. Figure 12 shows such an embodiment. In one embodiment, the hydraulic pump 302 is a variable displacement piston pump with pressure compensating controls to maintain a constant system pressure in the hydraulic system. In one embodiment, the hydraulic motor 304 is a fixed displacement gear motor. In one embodiment, each of the first and second power transmission devices 302, 304 are a hydraulic device configured to operate as both a pump and a motor.

[0024] With reference to Figure 1, the chassis engine output 150 corresponds to the output of the PTO 106. However, the chassis power system 100 and power boost system 300 can be configured to drive the first power transmission device 302 at other locations. Figure 2 shows four alternative engine output sources for driving the first device 302: an accessory drive belt 150a; a front mounted PTO 150b; a rear mounted PTO 150c; and a gear drive l50d that can power an air compressor, a fuel injection pump, or a user installed accessory.

[0025] With reference to Figure 1, the auxiliary engine output 250 corresponds to the auxiliary engine mounted PTO 206 that drives fan 208. However, the auxiliary power system 200 and power boost system 300 can be configured to input power from the second power transmission device 304 at other locations. Figure 3 shows three alternative power input locations for the second device 304: a shaft 250a of fan 208; an additional PTO 250b output of the auxiliary engine 202; and a front accessory drive 250c of the auxiliary engine 202. Additionally, the power input can be at another power path, such as the gear drive that powers an air compressor, a fuel injection pump, or a user installed accessory.

[0026] Referring to Figure 4, an exemplary embodiment of a power boost system 300 is shown in which the system is based on hydraulic components. As such, the first power transmission device 302 will be referenced as pump 302 and the second power transmission device will be referenced as hydraulic motor 304. As

6 shown, hydraulic pump 302 draws hydraulic fluid from a reservoir or tank 308. Downstream of the pump 302 is a spring check valve 310. Spring check valve 310 is for preventing hydraulic fluid from flowing in reverse from the hydraulic motor 304 towards the hydraulic pump 302. However, check valve 310 is not present where each of the devices 302, 304 are configured to function as either a motor or a pump so that power can be transmitted auxiliary engine to the chassis engine and vice versa.

[0027] Between the check valve 310 and the pump 302 is a pressure relief valve 312 which vents back to the tank 308. Pressure relief valve 312 is for protecting the hydraulic system from over pressurization. Downstream of the check valve 310 is an anti-cavitation check valve 314 in fluid communication with tank 308. The anti- cavitation valve is configured to permit hydraulic fluid to flow to the motor 304 even if there is a lack of flow from pump 302 and/or when the motor 304 is rotating at an excess capacity as compared to the pump 302 (i.e. when the motor 304 is winding down). Also downstream of the check valve 310 is a flow control valve 316 that can be utilized to regulate flow to the hydraulic motor 304 from the pump 302. In one embodiment, the flow control valve 316 will limit system flow in the event of a failure. Figure 4 also shows the pump 302 engaged with the transmission mounted power take-off unit 106 wherein a PTO 106 is clutched to engage and disengage with the pump 302. Power boost system 300 can also be provided with a storage device 318, such as an accumulator 318, for reclaiming braking or energy normally lost to heat, and can provide an additional power source under high load conditions.

[0028] As configured in Figure 4, the power boost system 300 can operate in a "shared power on" mode and a "shared power off mode. In the shared power on mode, the clutched PTO 106 engages to drive the hydraulic pump 302. The flow from the pump 302 will cause the hydraulic motor 304 to rotate at the speed of the auxiliary engine component to which it is connected.

7 [0029] In one embodiment, a transmission mounted, PTO driven first power transmission device 302 is utilized in a configuration where the PTO output is dependent upon the travel speed of the vehicle 20, as is the case with an Allison 2500 RDS transmission, and similar designs. In such a case, the PTO 106 is driven at "turbine speed" wherein the turbine rotational speed is nearly equal to the engine crankshaft rotational speed. This is the case except when the transmission 104 is in gear and the vehicle 20 is at a full stop. In this configuration, full power is available once the vehicle 20 exceeds a minimum travel speed, or if the transmission 104 is in the neutral position. Accordingly, the first device 302 will be driven by the PTO 106 whenever the vehicle 20 is in motion and the transmission is in a non-neutral gear. This configuration additionally allows for energy to be reclaimed during braking, and/or engine-braking events. Also, power to the first device 302 can be selectively turned off when not required. When first device 302 is operational, the first device 302 can be selectively controlled to meet the second device 304 speed requirements.

[0030] In one embodiment, a transmission mounted, PTO driven first power transmission device 302 is utilized in a configuration where the PTO 106 is driven by the engine crankshaft, as is the case with an Allison 3500 RDS transmission, and similar designs. In such a configuration, power output from the PTO 106 is available whenever the engine 102 is rotating. Accordingly, full power to the first device 302 is always available regardless of vehicle 20 speed. If a transmission gear is selected that allows the engine to be back-driven during decelerations, the first device 302 will be driven whenever the vehicle 20 is in motion. In such a configuration, energy can be reclaimed through the first device 302 during braking, and/or engine-braking events. Also, power to the first device 302 can be selectively turned off when not required. When first device 302 is operational, the device 302 can be selectively controlled to meet the second device 304 speed requirements.

[0031] In the shared power off mode, the clutched PTO 106 disengages with the first power transmission device 302 such that the device 302 will not rotate and no power is transmitted (i.e. no hydraulic fluid flow is produced in a hydraulic circuit).

8 In a hydraulic based embodiment, a pump check valve 310 can be used to ensure that reverse hydraulic flow will not cause the pump 302 to rotate in the opposite direction. However, when the auxiliary engine 202 is operating, the second device 304 can be rotated by the engine 202. When this occurs, the motor 304 operates as a pump and hydraulic fluid is allowed to circulate between the tank 308 and the motor 304 via the flow path defined by the anti-cavitation valve 314. Alternatively, the hydraulic motor 304 can utilize a clutch instead of adapter 216, such that the motor 304 can be disengaged from the auxiliary engine output 250 when not in use. In one embodiment, the clutch is an overrunning clutch. A clutch may also be electrically or otherwise selectively controlled to engage and disengage with the motor 304.

[0032] In one embodiment, the second power transmission device 304 provides power to the first power transmission device 302 in a second power sharing mode such that the auxiliary engine 202 can provide power to the chassis engine 102. This mode of operation is beneficial in applications where the chassis engine may be underpowered due to any number of factors.

[0033] Although power boost system 300 has been described in detail with hydraulic components, other types of power transfer systems may be utilized as well for the first and second power transmission devices 302, 304 shown in Figure 1. For example, the first and second power transmission devices 302, 304 of Figure 1 can be electrical generators and motors. Pneumatic based components such as air pumps and air motors could also be utilized for the first and second devices 302, 304. Also, electrical batteries, electrical capacitors, and/or air tanks may be utilized to store regeneration energy, for example from slowing, braking, or engine-braking the vehicle 20. [0034] It is also noted that the power boost system 300 can be retrofitted onto an existing vehicle 20 already configured with a chassis engine and an auxiliary engine. In such an application, the power boost system 300 can be turned off or

disconnected without any loss in functionality of the chassis and auxiliary engine systems. In a new system, the auxiliary engine 202 can be sized smaller than a

9 traditionally sized dual engine system, as the power from the chassis engine augments the auxiliary engine power. For example, instead of installing an auxiliary engine having a rated power output in the range of 99 to 115 horsepower, a smaller 74 horsepower engine could be installed. Since the chassis engine 102 is generally underutilized during sweeping operations, the chassis engine 102 will be able to transfer the remaining 25 to 41 horsepower to the auxiliary engine. Accordingly, the maximum output capacity of the auxiliary engine can actually be designed to be less than the maximum input power requirements for the powered non-driving functions of the vehicle 20. [0035] The various embodiments described above are provided by way of illustration only and should not be construed to limit the claims attached hereto. Those skilled in the art will readily recognize various modifications and changes that may be made without following the example embodiments and applications illustrated and described herein, and without departing from the true spirit and scope of the disclosure.

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