Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR CONFIGURING ANALYTIC RULES TO EQUIPMENT BASED UPON BUILDING DATA
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2021/046017
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An energy management system is disclosed for optimizing energy usage of HVAC equipment in a building complex. The energy management system is configured to be integrated into an existing Building Automation System ("BAS system") in order to process the data points in a less time consuming and efficient manner relative to known systems that map one point at a time. The BAS system data points are "point mapped", i.e., uploaded to a file in the "cloud", and are updated continuously as a function of time and deposited in a "bucket" in which the data points are unfiltered. These data points can then be filtered by node path and equipment in order to bulk tag equipment and bulk tag points in each of the buildings. These bulk tagged points data points can then be linked to specific rules in an analytical rules library. The system automatically applies predetermined analytical rules to tagged HVAC data points without specific knowledge of the rule by the user. These analytical rules are used to determine energy usage for each type of equipment and are pre-stored in the cloud. By selecting an equipment type, the correct analytical rule is automatically applied in bulk to the selected HVAC equipment type, and a report may be selectively generated for the selected piece(s) of HVAC equipment.

Inventors:
HALLENDY CHRIS (US)
DEVOTO CARLOS (US)
BOOTCHECK JUSTIN (US)
RUCH CHAD (US)
MURPHY KEITH (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US2020/048883
Publication Date:
March 11, 2021
Filing Date:
September 01, 2020
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
RESOLUTE BUILDING INTELLIGENCE LLC (US)
International Classes:
B23P19/06; B25B23/14; F24F11/46; F24F11/64; G05B15/02; G05B19/042
Foreign References:
US20170329292A12017-11-16
US20170212668A12017-07-27
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PANIAGUAS, John, S. (US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

We claim:

1. A method for managing the energy usage of a commercial building, the method comprising the steps:

(a) mapping raw data points into a file;

(b) filtering said raw data points by equipment, node or point;

(c) selecting equipment, nodes or points;

(d) bulk tagging selected equipment or points; and

(e) applying analytical rules to tagged equipment or points.

2. The method recited in Claim 1 , wherein step (a) includes the steps of:

(a1) mapping said raw data points from a building automation system (BAS) into a file; and

(a2) parsing said raw data points to enable filtering by: building, sub-building, floor , nodes .and equipment.

3. The method as recited in claim 2, wherein said raw data points are bulked into said file.

4. The method as recited in claim 3, wherein said raw data points are selectively mapped into said file.

5. The method recited in Claim 1 , further comprising step (f):

(f) filtering the mapped raw data points by points, equipment , floor, sub-building, building or a combination of the same.

6. The method recited in Claim 1 , further comprising the steps of :

(g1 ) filtering the mapped raw data points by a selected node; (g2) displaying a list of all of the child nodes under the selected node.

7. The method recited in Claim 6, further comprising the steps of ;

(g3) selecting a child node from the display; and

(g4) filtering the child nodes to illustrate nodes or points under the selected child node.

8. The method recited in Claim 1 , further including the steps of:

(hi) linking equipment with analytical rules; and

(h2) filtering said equipment by node path, display name or type.

(h3) bulk tagging selected equipment to connect said equipment to an analytical rule.

9. An energy management system comprising: means for mapping raw data points into a file; means for filtering said raw data points by equipment, node or point; means for selecting equipment, nodes or points; means for bulk tagging selected equipment or points; and means for applying analytical rules to tagged equipment or points.

Description:
SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR CONFIGURING ANALYTIC RULES TO EQUIPMENT

BASED UPON BUILDING DATA

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION . Field of the Invention

[0001] The present invention relates to a system for collecting HVAC data from a Building Automation System (“BAS system”) and analyzing that data in real time in order to manage energy use and efficiency. 2. Description of the Prior Art.

[0002] BAS systems are known. Examples of such BAS systems are disclosed in detail in US Patent No. 9,262.371 and US Patent Application Publication No. US 2018/0341241 A1. Known BAS systems are used to control and monitor heating ventilating and control (“HVAC”) systems in commercial buildings. In order to control HVAC equipment, BAS systems track a voluminous number of raw data points to control HVAC equipment.

[0003] HVAC systems are a significant and growing part of the country’s energy resources. One drawback of such BAS systems is they do not optimize HVAC energy usage. Such systems do not operate in real time and therefore cannot trend HVAC equipment data and cannot optimize HVAC energy usage. Energy management systems are known and can be integrated with BAS systems to optimize energy usage in building complexes, such as commercial building complexes, and can track energy usage in real time. [0004] In order to optimize HVAC energy usage, equipment data as a function of time is required along with hierarchal models of the buildings in a building complex. Rather than create data points for the building and the equipment, known energy management systems utilize raw data points from the BAS systems. The naming system for each of such raw data points may include; names of the buildings, equipment and raw data. Each BAS system vendor uses their own naming system for the raw data points. These naming systems often use cryptic character strings to identify the equipment, the location of the equipment and sensor output data. These cryptic designations must be deciphered in order to be used in an energy management system. An exemplary character string for a BAS system raw data point may be as follows: “NiagaraNetwork/redicoBCN/points/ChlrPlant/Chlr2/ChlrPts/D ischAirTemp”. This character string refers to one of the Niagara building complexes, referred to as the Redico BCN (Blue Care Network). It also identifies the sensor data as discharge air temperature from the #2 Chiller Plant at that facility. Other BAS system suppliers are known to use different naming conventions.

[0005] In large commercial building complexes, the raw data points in such BAS systems can consist of thousands of raw data points. Each data point must be deciphered and mapped to a specific piece of equipment in the building complex in order to manage the energy usage and efficiency. These data points are then processed by analytics in order to optimize the energy usage. Heretofore, processing raw data points for use in energy management systems has been done manually; only one point at a time. With thousands of data points, this process can be extremely time consuming and take months. [0006] What is needed is an automated method for processing BAS system data points for energy management systems that allows the data points to be processed in hours rather than months.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] Briefly, the present invention relates to an energy management system for optimizing energy usage of HVAC equipment in a building complex. The energy management system is configured to be integrated into an existing Building Automation System (“BAS system”) in order to process the data points in a less time consuming and efficient manner relative to known systems that map one point at a time. The BAS system data points are “point mapped”, i.e. , uploaded to a file in the “cloud”, and are updated continuously as a function of time and deposited in a “bucket” in which the data points are unfiltered. These data points can then be filtered by node path and equipment in order to bulk tag equipment and bulk tag points in each of the buildings. These bulk tagged data points can then be linked to rules in an analytical rules library. The system automatically applies predetermined analytical rules to tagged HVAC data points without specific knowledge of the rule by the user. These analytical rules are used to determine energy usage for each type of equipment and are pre-stored in the cloud. By selecting an equipment type, the correct analytical rule is automatically applied in bulk to the selected HVAC equipment type, and a report may be selectively generated for the selected piece(s) of HVAC equipment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

[0008] These and other advantages of the present invention will be readily understood with reference to the following specification and attached drawing wherein: [0009] Fig.1 is an isometric view of a building, partially cut away, illustrating various pieces of equipment in the cutaway portion of the building and the data flow path of the data from the equipment to a gateway and from the gateway to the energy management system.

[0010] Fig. 2 is a simplified process flow diagram for the energy management system. [0011] Fig. 3 is an exemplary rule for discharge air temperature failure.

[0012] Figs. 4A-4F is an exemplary set of analytical rules for use in the energy management system.

[0013] Fig. 5 is a screen shot of the raw data points after being mapped to a file in the cloud.

[0014] Fig. 6 is a screen shot illustrating the node editor function of the energy management system.

[0015] Fig. 7 is a screen shot illustrating the equipment bulk tagging function of the energy management system.

[0016] Fig. 8 is a screen shot illustrating the bulk point mapping function of the energy management system.

[0017] Fig. 9 is a screen shot illustrating mapping of the analytical rules to specific pieces of equipment by node path.

[0018] Figs. 10A and 10B illustrate the principles of operation of the energy management system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0019] The present invention relates to an energy management system for optimizing energy usage of FIVAC equipment in a building complex. The energy management system is configured to be integrated into an existing Building Automation System (“BAS system”) in order to process the HVAC data points in a less time-consuming and efficient manner relative to known systems that map one point at a time. The BAS system data points are “point mapped”, i.e. , uploaded to a file in the “cloud”, and are updated continuously as a function of time and deposited in a “bucket” in which the data points are unfiltered. These data points can then be filtered by node path and equipment in order to bulk tag equipment and bulk tag points in each of the buildings. These bulk tagged data points can then be linked to rules in an analytical rules library. The system automatically applies the predetermined analytical rules to tagged data points without specific knowledge of the rule by the user. These analytical rules are used to determine energy usage for each type of equipment and are pre-stored in the cloud. By selecting an equipment type, the correct analytical rule is automatically applied in bulk to the selected HVAC equipment type, and a report may be selectively generated for the selected piece(s) of HVAC equipment.

[0020] Before getting into the specifics of the energy management system, it is necessary to put the system in context. Referring to Fig. 1, an exemplary building 20 is shown with a corner cut-out to provide a simplified illustration of the BAS system equipment installed by the BAS system contractor in that portion of the building. As shown, the building has 3 floors: 22, 24 and 26. Each floor 22, 24 and 26 has multiple HVAC zones. For example, the first floor 22 has zones 28, 30, 32, 34, 36 and 38. Floors 24 and 26 each have multiple HVAC zones.

[0021] As shown an air duct 40 extends from the top floor 26 through the middle floor 24 and to the bottom floor 22. Air discharge ports 42 and 44 extending from the air duct are shown for floors 24 and 26. A roof top unit (“RTU”) 46 is used for providing both heating and cooling air to the air duct 40 as a function of the set points of the thermostats 48 and 50 on floors 26 and 24 respectively.

[0022] The exemplary configuration shown is a variable air volume (“VAV”) system. Such systems are well known and work on the principle of providing a constant temperature and varying the volume. In the example shown, each of the air discharge ports include a damper (not shown) that is controlled by a VAV controller 52, 54. The RTU 46 supplies constant air temperature to the vertical air duct 40. The temperature in each zone is adjusted by varying the damper position in the discharge port 42, 44. [0023] In a typical BAS system, all of the sensor and equipment data is routed to a gateway 56, as shown by the dotted line 58. These data points are routed to a central controller for control and monitoring of the HVAC equipment in a building. As mentioned above for a complex commercial building, there can be thousands of points. [0024] The energy management system in accordance with the present invention has multiple operating nodes. Referring to Fig. 2, these operating modes include: point mapping 65, node editing 67, equipment and point tagging 69, and applying bulk analytical rules 71 to equipment and nodes. The bulk rules mode relates to previously stored analytical rules that are linked to specific pieces of equipment. These rules are used to process mapped data points into customized energy management reports 73 and 75, as shown in Fig. 2.

[0025] An exemplary rule is illustrated in Fig. 3. This rule automatically analyzes temperature in a selected zone. More specifically, the rule compares zone temperature with set points. In this example, the set points are 60 and 100 degrees F and lapses of data for over 60 minutes. In this example, a zone temperature less than 60 degrees, more than 100 degrees, or lapses of data of over 60 minutes generate a false signal, indicating an anomaly in that zone.

[0026] Figs. 4A-4F illustrate an exemplary list of the type of analytical rules that can be used in the energy management system. This list of exemplary analytical rules can be based on various system temperature and pressure set points as well as various equipment and sensor failures and anomalies in an FIVAC system that effect the system efficiency.

[0027] In order to map the raw data points from the BAS system into the cloud for processing, the system taps the gateway 56 (Fig. 1) and uses point mapping to map all of the BAS system raw data points into a file in a scalable cloud architecture, shown by the dotted line 62. These raw data points are saved in a single unsorted field in a spread sheet or “bucket”.

[0028] As will be discussed in more detail below, once the raw data points have been mapped to the bucket, further processing of the raw data points is in the cloud. The processing includes filtering the raw data for facilitating searching building hierarchy nodes, for example, by building, sub-building, floor equipment and points in a similar manner as data is filtered in a file on an Excel spreadsheet. A detailed description of the processing of the raw data points is illustrated in Figs. 10A and 10B. Figs. 5-9 illustrate examples for processing of the raw data points.

[0029] Exemplary applications of the point mapper, node editor, equipment and point tagging are illustrated in Figs. 5-9. Fig. 5 is an exemplary application of the point mapper mode. Fig. 6 is an exemplary application of the node editor mode. Fig. 7 is an exemplary application of the equipment bulk tagging mode. Fig. 8 is an exemplary application of the bulk point tagging mode. Fig. 9 is an exemplary application of the rule mode.

[0030] Turning first to Fig. 5, the raw data points are mapped to a file in the cloud by selecting the “Bulk” button 71 at the top of the screen. Selection of the “Bulk” button 71 causes all of the raw data points to be listed in a file with a check box next to each data point. The checkbox allows a user to select each data point to be mapped. For example, a user can map a raw data point, or ignore it by way of the buttons 72 and 74. In particular, selecting the “Map Points” button 72 automatically maps all of the checked data points into the bucket.

[0031] Once the raw data points have been mapped, the number of mapped data points, unmapped data points, and ignored data points is listed, as shown by the reference numerals 66, 68 and 70. As shown the exemplary bucket includes 18,845 mapped data points, 147 unmapped data points, and 463 ignored points.

[0032] The system allows the mapped data points to be filtered by points, equipment, floor, sub-building or building or by a combination of filters. The raw data strings are parsed, for example, by way of an Excel text to column function that maps data between delimiters in the data string to separate fields to allow filtering of data in the different fields. For the data string mentioned above, the delimiters are forward slashes. Filters may be selected by way of a text box 73 and selecting the “Apply

Filter” button 76.

[0033] The system also includes a node editor. In general, the node editor function enables each node (each mapped point in the bucket, such as, building, sub-building, floor, equipment or point) to be decomposed to understand what is under them and is used to finalize the hierarchy and verify that bulk mapped points are in the hierarchy of a building. This function also allows nodes to be moved.

[0034] In the exemplary application shown in Fig.6, the “Node Editor” button 79 at the top of the screen is selected for this function. The Node Editor processes data points that have previously been mapped into the bucket and parsed. In this example, the node selected is “Blue Care Network/sub-building/floor/equipment”. This node was selected by typing the description of the node into the text box 81 and selecting the “Apply Filter” button 76. In this case, the display 80 indicates the node as Blue Care Network. Also displayed under the display 80 are the child nodes 83, sub-building, floor and equipment. Reference numeral 82 indicates the sub-building while reference numeral 84 illustrates the equipment in the node while reference numeral 87 various child nodes under the Blue Care Network. These child nodes can be selected by checking the check box next to the child node and selecting the “Apply Filter” button 76 to illustrate the nodes or points under a child node.

[0035] The system also includes a bulk equipment tagging mode of operation and a bulk point tagging mode of operation. The bulk equipment tagging mode allows equipment to be filtered by node path, display name and type and tagged. An exemplary application of this function is illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8. This mode may be selected by way of the Bulk button 86 and the text boxes 88 and 89. Fig. 7 relates to bulk equipment tagging and displays all equipment along a node path. Fig. 8 relates to bulk point tagging. Once the equipment or a point is tagged, it can be linked to analytical rules that are used to determine the efficiency of the HVAC equipment on a real-time basis.

[0036] With respect to Fig. 7, equipment can be filtered by node path or display name by way of the text boxes 88 and 89. In this case, the data was filtered by the node path “Redico/BlueCare Network”. As shown, the node path and equipment type in the node path are listed. Each listing includes a check box that allows a user to select equipment to be tagged. Next, the equipment to be tagged is selected from a drop-down menu 91. For example, the word “Boiler” can be selected from the drop-down menu 91. In order to bulk tag all boilers, the “Apply Changes” button 92 is selected. This would result in bulk tagging all of the displayed names that include the word “Boiler”.

[0037] Fig. 8 illustrates an example of bulk point tagging and is similar to bulk tagging of equipment but relates to bulk tagging of points. These points include unique name, point type, parent equipment , search name, display name and units. These points can be selected by way of the drop-down menus 95, 97 and 99. The table is then filtered according to the search criteria. Each point includes a check box, as shown. Individual points can be selected by checking individual check boxes or selecting “AN” from the Point Type template 95. By selecting the Apply Changes button, the selected points are tagged.

[0038] An important aspect of the invention relates to the automatic bulk application of analytical rules to tagged equipment. In particular, the system includes an analytical rules library that is stored in the cloud. Input points for the analytical rules may include point tags and several constants, such as delay, high threshold, low threshold with adjustable defaults and several outputs; Boolean and numeric. The analytical rules library may contain rules on multiple equipment types, for example, an air handling unit (“AHU”), boilers, chiller, pumps, fans, VAV controllers and can be expanded to add additional rules.

[0039] The analytical rules are linked to each piece of equipment and may be bulk applied to equipment having the same equipment tag, for example, by way of an Excel connect function that connects one or more specific analytical rules to each piece of equipment. As such, users do not need to know the specific analytic rules that apply to each piece of equipment. To select and apply an analytical rule to a specific equipment, a drop-down menu will only display the rules applicable for the selected equipment type, thus preventing analytical rule errors.

[0040] An exemplary application of bulk application of the rules is illustrated in Fig. 9. The rule function is selected by way of the rules button 104 on the top of the screen. The analytical rules can be filtered by node path by way of the text box 106 or by equipment type by way of a drop-down menu 108. The “Apply Filter” button is then selected to display the results based upon the search criteria.

[0041] Analytical rules are applied to equipment by selecting a rule from the drop down menu 110, thereby highlighting the selected check boxes. Once an analytical rule is selected from the drop-down list 110, selection of the “Apply Filter” button 112 applies the selected rule to all equipment in the list containing a selected check box. As shown, once analytical rules are applied to specific equipment, the rules are listed. These rules are used to run analytics 73 (Fig. 2) The analytics may be used to provide a hierarchal representation of time-based FIVAC system anomalies as well provide an overall report 75. [0042] Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. Thus, it is to be understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described above.

[0043] What is claimed and desired to be secured by a Letters Patent of the

United States is: