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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
A WHISK AND A HAND HELD MIXER USING THE SAME
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2017/158086
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A whisk comprises a shaft (10) having a first end (12) for attaching to a hand tool for electrically rotating the shaft and a second, opposite, end (14). A set of wires (16) extends from the second end to form the whisk part (17), each wire forming a loop. Each loop has a pair of concave sides and a convex head joining the ends of the two concave sides at a tip region (20) of the whisk. The convex head has a smaller radius of curvature at the outer edges of the head than in the middle of the head.

Inventors:
CARTEI MIRKO (NL)
IVARSSON BENGT IVAR ANDERS (NL)
WAN VICKI (NL)
Application Number:
PCT/EP2017/056230
Publication Date:
September 21, 2017
Filing Date:
March 16, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS NV (NL)
International Classes:
A47J43/07; A47J43/10
Domestic Patent References:
WO2010130826A22010-11-18
Foreign References:
DE807315C1951-06-28
DE29614120U11997-12-18
CH130380A1928-12-15
DE29907647U11999-08-05
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
FREEKE, Arnold, Jan et al. (5656 AE Eindhoven, NL)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A whisk comprising:

a shaft (10) having a first end (12) for attaching to a hand tool for electrically rotating the shaft and a second, opposite, end (14); and

a set of wires (16) extending from the second end to form the whisk part (17), each wire forming a loop, wherein each loop has a pair of concave sides and a convex head joining the ends of the two concave sides at a tip region (20) of the whisk, the convex head having a smaller radius of curvature at the outer edges of the head than in the middle of the head. 2. A whisk as claimed in claim 1, wherein the width (w) of the convex head is in the range 40mm to 70mm.

3. A whisk as claimed in claim 2, wherein the width (w) of the convex head is in the range 50mm to 60mm.

4. A whisk as claimed in any preceding claim, wherein the height (H) of each loop is in the range 100mm to 140mm.

5. A whisk as claimed in claim 4, wherein the height (H) of each loop is in the range 110mm to 120mm.

6. A whisk as claimed in any preceding claim, wherein each wire loop has a different height. 7. A whisk as claimed in any preceding claim, wherein the set of wires comprises six wires (16).

8. A whisk as claimed in claim 7, wherein the six wires are regularly angularly spaced to form a cage.

9. A whisk as claimed in any preceding claim, wherein a height (d) of the tip region (20) is in the range 10mm to 25mm.

10. A whisk as claimed in any preceding claim, adapted for whisking a depth of liquid (D) greater than a height of the tip region.

11. A whisk as claimed in any preceding claim, comprising a connection part (22) between the second end (14) of the shaft and the whisk part (17).

12. A whisk as claimed in any preceding claim, further comprising a manual handle towards the first end of the shaft.

13. A hand held electric mixer comprising:

a main body (40);

a motor in the main body;

an opening for receiving the shaft (10) of an accessory; and

a whisk (42) as claimed in any preceding claim.

Description:
A whisk and a hand held mixer using the same

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a balloon whisk, and in particular a balloon whisk attachment for a hand held electric kitchen mixer.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

For domestic use, there are two main kinds of accessory for whisking ingredients, one is a beater which is driven by mixer machine, and the other is a whisk which is manually operated by user.

A beater for use with a mixer machine typically comprises a single whisk part or a pair of whisk parts which rotate in unison. The whisk part, or the two whisk parts, comprise a wire frame, for example with a set of two or three substantially rectangular wires forming a cross or hexagonal star (when viewed along the elongate axis). The wires are connected together at the tip of the whisk to form a rigid structure. When two whisk parts are used, they are arranged to mesh together. A manual version of such a whisk is also well- known.

The so-called balloon whisk is popular with consumers and is generally used manually. The balloon whisk is a single whisk part, again formed as a wire frame comprising multiple wire (balloon shaped) loops. There are typically six or even more wires which together form a teardrop shaped cage, with a cap on the top of the whisk for the consumer to easily grip the whisk.

The wires are not connected together so that the overall structure is less rigid than a beater design. It means the whisking allows more air to be introduced during whisking.

In both designs, the wires can be bare metal wire or metal wire enclosed by a silicone or nylon jacket.

There are also balloon whisk attachments for hand held electric mixers.

Beaters and balloon whisks are for example used for whisking egg whites and cream. When whisking egg whites, consumers usually need to work with a small quantity of eggs such as between two egg whites and twelve egg whites. For cream, consumers typically work with a range of between 100ml and 750ml of cream. Beater and whisk attachments for hand held mixers comprise a metal shaft having a profile at one end to be clamped by an adaptor which is integrated into the mixer motor gear. A beater is rotated at very high speed. Since the speed of revolution of the beater is high, the whisking can be done in a short time, usually it takes around 1-3 minutes to whip up egg white and 3-8 minutes to whip up cream using the mixer.

A problem with the use of a balloon whisk attachment is the amount of splashing caused. Furthermore, the effectiveness is reduced when small volumes are to be whisked.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is defined by the claims.

According to examples in accordance with an aspect of the invention, there is provided a whisk comprising:

a shaft having a first end for attaching to a hand tool for electrically rotating the shaft and a second, opposite, end; and

a set of wires extending from the second end to form the whisk part, each wire forming a loop, wherein each loop has a pair of concave sides and a convex head joining the ends of the two concave sides at a tip region of the whisk.

This design replaces the conventional balloon shape with a concave part leading to the whisk tip region, and a convex whisk tip region. The concave part keeps the width of the whisk small until the tip region, so that the whisking function is more concentrated at the tip region. This reduces splashing. It also means that the whisk can be used for whisking small volumes (in particular small depths).

The width of the convex head is for example in the range 40mm to 70mm. This provides a small overall width, suitable for whisking small quantities of liquid.

Where the concave sides join to the convex head, they together form an outer envelope with a generally conical shape.

The frame of reference used for the terms "concave" and "convex" is outside the whisk. Thus, by concave is meant curving inwardly into the whisk body, and by convex is meant curving outwardly from the whisk body.

The width of the convex head may be in the range 50mm to 60mm, for example 55mm. This small diameter helps to reduce splashing while still enabling effective whisking. The height of each loop is preferably in the range 100mm to 140mm. The height of each loop is for example in the range 110mm to 120mm, for example 115mm.

Each wire loop for example has a different height. In this way, they do not interfere with each other, and may instead be free standing wire loops. The heights of all loops are however such that the loops all reach the tip region of the whisk.

The set of wires may comprise six wires (i.e. six wire loops), so that there are twelve wire parts around the whisk part. The six wires (and therefore twelve wire parts) are regularly angularly spaced to form a cage.

A height of the tip region is preferably in the range 10mm to 25mm. This tip region is the part where all wires have their convex head. The heads are preferably not connected together, unlike the wires of a conventional beater. The maximum diameter of the whisk is at the interface between the convex head and the concave sides.

By having the tip region of low height, the part of the whisk where it has its maximum diameter can be designed to be below the surface of the liquid being whisked.

The whisk is preferably adapted for whisking a depth of liquid greater than a height of the tip region.

A connection part is preferably provided between the second end of the shaft and the whisk part. The first end of the shaft may comprise a drive coupling. This enables the whisk to be driven by a mixer. A manual handle may also be provided towards the first end of the shaft. In this way, the whisk may be used manually or attached to an electric mixer.

The invention also provides a hand held electric mixer comprising:

a main body;

a motor in the main body;

an opening for receiving the shaft of an accessory; and

a whisk as defined above.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Examples of the invention will now be described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 shows a whisk in side view and end view;

Fig. 2 shows an exploded view of the whisk of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 shows one example of the dimensions of the whisk;

Fig. 4 shows the design of Fig. 2 in assembled form in cross section;

Fig. 5 shows an alternative design; and Fig. 6 shows a hand held electric mixer using the whisk.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

The invention provides a whisk which comprises a shaft having a first end for attaching to a hand tool for electrically rotating the shaft and a second, opposite, end. A set of wires extends from the second end to form the whisk part, each wire forming a loop. Each loop has a pair of concave sides and a convex head joining the ends of the two concave sides at a tip region of the whisk. The width of the convex head is for example in the range 40mm to 70mm.

Fig. 1 shows a whisk in side view and end view. The whisk comprises a shaft

10 having a first end 12 for attaching to a hand tool for electrically rotating the shaft and a second, opposite, end 14.

For rotating the shaft, the shaft has a pair of diametrically opposing lugs 15.

These lugs fit into a drive opening of a mixing machine.

A set of wires 16 forms the whisk part 17. Each wire 16 forms a loop so that it has two diametrically opposite wire parts along a shaft region 18 of the whisk part. These wire parts form concave sides. A convex head joins the ends of the two concave sides at a tip region 20 of the whisk part 17.

The wires 16 at the end of the shaft region 18 where they meet with the tip region 20 together define an essentially conical outer envelope. Thus, they form a circular ring of wires, and they taper inwardly towards the end of the shaft region 18 remote from the tip region 20.

A connection part 22 is provided between the second end 14 of the shaft 10 and the whisk part 17.

The concave sides are curved inwardly compared to a straight line from the outer edges of the head to the connection part 22. In this way, the whisk part has an enlarged head with low height.

The concave curvature is for example such that the maximum deviation from a straight line joining the ends of the side is less than 20% of the length of the sides, for example less than 10% of the length of the sides.

The convex head has a smaller radius of curvature at the edges than in the middle, again so that a flattened head is formed. This design is similar to a balloon whisk in that the wires are not connected together. However, the wires are no longer balloon shaped but have a new shape. The whisk also has a smaller size than a conventional balloon whisk.

As shown in the end view, there are six wires each forming a loop, therefore forming twelve wire parts and six convex heads.

The overall shape thus comprises a concave part along the shaft region 18 and a convex tip region 20. The concave part along the shaft region keeps the width of the whisk small until the tip region, so that the whisking function is more concentrated at the tip region. This reduces splashing. It also means that the whisk can be used for whisking small volumes (in particular small depths) with the tip region below the surface of the liquid.

In particular, the part of the whisk at which the diameter is maximum is able to be kept below the surface of the liquid, even when the volume of liquid to be whisked is small. This is made possible by having a small height of the tip region, combined with the design of the shaft region 18 which tapers inwardly with concave sides immediately after the convex tip region. These features in combination enable reduced splashing and enable effective whisking down to small quantities of liquid.

Fig. 2 shows an exploded view. The connection part 22 comprises a first grip part 24 for gripping the wires and the shaft 10, and an outer sleeve 26.

Fig. 3 shows one example of the dimensions of the whisk.

The tip region 20 has a width of 55mm and a height in the range 10mm to

25mm, for example 20mm. The shaft 10 has a diameter of 5mm. The height of the whisk part 17 is 115mm from the connection part 22 to the outermost extremity of the tip region 20. The connection part 22 has an outer diameter of 19mm.

The six wire loops all have their lowermost ends within the tip region 20. They are only connected to each other by the connection part 22. The six loops all have slightly different length so that their lowermost ends overlap.

The six loops form twelve wires 16, and they are evenly angularly spaced at 30 degree intervals as shown in the end view. Each wire for example comprises a 1.4mm diameter stainless steel wire, optionally coated for example with nylon.

Fig. 4 shows the design of Fig. 2 in assembled form in cross section. The height of the tip region is shown as d and the height of the whisk part 17 is shown as H. The width of the convex head part is w. The whisk is for use with a depth D of liquid which exceeds the height d of the tip region. This depth D is for example 30mm for normal use of the whisk. Fig. 5 shows an alternative design with a two piece internal connector 24a, 24b. One part 24a engages with the end of the shaft 10. The whisk wires pass through both parts 24a, 24b and they are coupled together by the outer sleeve 26. The connector part 24a is coupled to the shaft 10 so that rotation of the shaft entrains rotation of the connector part 24a. The two connector parts are fitted within the outer sleeve 26 which couples the two connector parts together, in addition to the coupling provided by the wires.

A manual handle may also be provided towards the first end of the shaft 10 (not shown). The connector 22 may instead be used for this purpose.

Fig. 6 shows a hand held electric mixer comprising a main body 40 having a motor. The whisk 42 is fitted to an opening for receiving the shaft 10 of the whisk.

Other variations to the disclosed embodiments can be understood and effected by those skilled in the art in practicing the claimed invention, from a study of the drawings, the disclosure, and the appended claims. In the claims, the word "comprising" does not exclude other elements or steps, and the indefinite article "a" or "an" does not exclude a plurality. The mere fact that certain measures are recited in mutually different dependent claims does not indicate that a combination of these measures cannot be used to advantage.

Any reference signs in the claims should not be construed as limiting the scope.