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Title:
NOVEL PESTICIDAL PROTEINS AND STRAINS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1994/021795
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention is drawn to pesticidal strains and proteins. Bacillus strains which are capable of producing pesticidal proteins and auxiliary proteins during vegetative growth are provided. Also provided are the purified proteins, nucleotide sequences encoding the proteins and methods for using the strains, proteins and genes for controlling pests.

Inventors:
WARREN GREGORY W (US)
KOZIEL MICHAEL G (US)
MULLINS MARTHA A (US)
NYE GORDON J (US)
DESAI NALINI (US)
CARR BRIAN (US)
KOSTICHKA N KRISTY (US)
Application Number:
PCT/US1994/003131
Publication Date:
September 29, 1994
Filing Date:
March 23, 1994
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
CIBA GEIGY AG (CH)
WARREN GREGORY W (US)
KOZIEL MICHAEL G (US)
MULLINS MARTHA A (US)
NYE GORDON J (US)
DESAI NALINI (US)
CARR BRIAN (US)
KOSTICHKA N KRISTY (US)
International Classes:
A01H5/00; A01N63/00; C07K14/32; C07K14/325; C07K14/415; C12N1/21; C12N5/10; C12N15/09; C12N15/31; C12N15/32; C12N15/82; C12P21/02; C12P21/08; (IPC1-7): C12N15/31; A01H5/00; A01N63/00; C12N1/21; C12N15/32; C12N15/82; C12P1/04
Domestic Patent References:
WO1991016434A21991-10-31
WO1988008880A11988-11-17
WO1990013651A11990-11-15
WO1991016432A11991-10-31
Foreign References:
Other References:
SEKAR, V.: "THE INSECTICIDAL CRYSTAL PROTEIN GENE IS EXPRESSED IN VEGETATIVE CELLS OF BACILLUS -THURINGIENSIS-VAR- TENEBRIONIS.", CURR MICROBIOL 17 (6). 1988. 347-350
KOZIEL, M. ET AL.: "Field performance of elite transgenic maize plants expressing an insecticidal protein derived from Bacillus thuringiensis", BIOTECHNOLOGY, vol. 11, February 1993 (1993-02-01), NEW YORK US, pages 194 - 200
YOSHISUE, H. ET AL.: "Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis 20-kDa protein on production of the Bti 130-kDa crystal protein in Escherichia coli", BIOSCIENCE, BIOTECHNOLOGY, AND BIOCHEMISTRY, vol. 56, no. 9, September 1992 (1992-09-01), pages 1429 - 1433
SHIVAKUMAR, A. ET AL.: "Cloned crystal protein genes express vegetatively in Bacillus subtilis", PLASMID, vol. 16, no. 3, November 1986 (1986-11-01), pages 230
HÖFTE, H. & WHITELEY, H.: "Insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis", MICROBIOLOGICAL REVIEWS, vol. 53, no. 2, June 1989 (1989-06-01), WASHINGTON DC, US, pages 242 - 255
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Claims:
What is claimed is:I . A substantially purified Bacillus strain which produces a pesticidal protein during vegetative growth. 2. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said Bacillus is selected from a Bacillus species listed in Table 1
1. 3. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said protein is capable of killing pests selected from insects, fungi, bacteria, nematodes, mites, ticks, protozoan pathogens, animal parasites, and the like. 4. The Bacillus strain of claim 3, wherein said protein is capable of killing insects selected from orders Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Homoptera, Hemiptera, Orthroptera, Thysanoptera, Dermaptera, Isoptera, Mallophaga, Anoplura, Siphonaptera, or Trichoptera. 5. The Bacillus strain of claim 4, wherein said coleopteran species is a Diabrotica. 6. The Bacillus strain of claim 5, wherein said Diabrotica is Diabrotica virgifera virgifera or Diabrotica longicomis barberi.
2. 7 The Bacillus strain of claim 4, wherein said lepidopteran species is an Agrotis.
3. 8 The Bacillus strain of claim 7, wherein said Agrotis is Agrotis ipsilon.
4. 9 The Bacillus strain of claim 2, wherein said Bacillus is Bacillus cereus.
5. The Bacillus strain of claim 9, wherein said Bacillus cereus is Bacillus cereus having Accession No. NRRL B21058. I I . The Bacillus strain of claim 2, wherein said Bacillus is Bacillus thuringensis. 12. The Bacillus strain of claim 11 , wherein said Bacillus thuringensis is Bacillus thuringensis having Accession No. NRRL B21060.
6. 13 The Bacillus strain of claim 2, wherein said protein has a molecular weight of 30 kDa or greater.
7. 14 The Bacillus strain of claim 13, wherein said protein has a molecular weight of about 60 to about 100 kDa.
8. The Bacillus strain of claim 14, wherein said protein has a molecular weight of about 80 kDa.
9. The Bacillus strain of claim 15, wherein said protein has the sequence given in SEQ. ID. NO:7.
10. The Bacillus strain of claim 14, wherein said protein has a molecular weight of about 100 kDa.
11. The Bacillus strain of claim 17, wherein said protein has the sequence given in SEQ. ID. NO:5.
12. A substantially pure pesticidal protein isolatable during the vegetative growth phase of Bacillus spp. or analogs and active fragments thereof.
13. The pesticidal protein of claim 19 wherein said Bacillus is selected from a Bacillus species listed in Table 11.
14. The pesticidal protein of claim 20, wherein said insects are selected from orders Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Homoptera, Hemiptera, Orthroptera, Thysanoptera, Dermaptera, Isoptera, Mallophaga, Anoplura, Siphonaptera, or Trichoptera.
15. The pesticidal protein of claim 21 , wherein said coleopteran species is a Diabrotica.
16. The pesticidal protein of claim 22, wherein said Diabrotica is Diabrotica virgifera virgifera or Diabrotica longicomis barberi.
17. The pesticidal protein of claim 21 , wherein said lepidopteran species is an Agrotis.
18. The pesticidal protein of claim 24, wherein said Agrotis is Agrotis ipsilon.
19. The pesticidal protein of claim 19, wherein said Bacillus is Bacillus cereus.
20. The pesticidal protein of claim 26, wherein said Bacillus cereus is Bacillus cereus having Accession No. B21058.
21. The pesticidal protein of claim 19, wherein said Bacillus is Bacillus thuringensis.
22. The pesticidal protein of claim 28, wherein said Bacillus thuringensis is Bacillus thuringensis selected from Accession Numbers NRRL B21060, NRRL B21224, NRRL B21225, NRRL B21226 and NRRL B21227.
23. The pesticidal protein of claim 19, wherein said protein has a molecular weight of 30 kDa or greater.
24. The pesticidal protein of claim 30, wherein said protein has a molecular weight of about 60 to about 100 kDa.
25. The pesticidal protein of claim 31 , wherein said protein has a molecular weight of about 80 kDa.
26. The pesticidal protein of claim 32, wherein said protein has the sequence given in SEQ ID NO:7.
27. The pesticidal protein of claim 31 , wherein said protein has the sequence given in SEQ ID NO:5.
28. The pesticidal protein of claim 19, wherein said protein comprises an Nterminal sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NOS:10 or 11. 36.
29. A substantially pure nucleotide sequence which encodes the protein of claim 19.
30. A substantially pure nucleotide sequence which encodes the protein of claim 33.
31. A substantially pure nucleotide sequence which encodes the protein of claim 34.
32. A substantially pure nucleotide sequence which encodes the protein of claim 35.
33. The nucleotide sequence of claim 36, wherein said sequence has been optimized for expression in a plant.
34. The nucleotide sequence of claim 40, wherein said plant is selected from maize, soybean, cotton, wheat, sunflower, tomato, potato, and oilseed rape.
35. The nucleotide sequence of claim 37, wherein said sequence has been optimized for expression in a plant.
36. The nucleotide sequence of claim 42, wherein said plant is selected from maize, soybean, cotton, wheat, sunflower, tomato, potato, and oilseed rape.
37. The nucleotide sequence of claim 38, wherein said sequence has been optimized for expression in a plant.
38. The nucleotide sequence of claim 44, wherein said sequence is set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18.
39. The nucleotide sequence of claim 39, wherein said sequence has been optimized for expression in a plant.
40. The nucleotide sequence of claim 46, wherein said sequence is set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17. 48.
41. The nucleotide sequence of claim 36, wherein said sequence has been optimized for expression in a microorganism.
42. The nucleotide sequence of claim 48, wherein said microorganism is selected from Bacillus. Pseudomonas. Saccharomyces. Clavibacter. Erwinia. Serratia. Klebsiella, Xanthomonas. Streptomyces. Agrobacterium. insect pathogenic viruses, fungi, protozoans and nematodes.
43. A plant which has been stably transformed with the nucleotide sequence of any one of claims 3647.
44. The plant of claim 48, wherein said plant is a maize plant.
45. The nucleotide sequence of claim 36, wherein said sequence is essentially the sequence of E_ ≤oli clone P54 having Accession No. NRRL B21059.
46. The nucleotide sequence of claim 36, wherein said sequence is essentially the sequence of IL coli clone P312 having Accession No. NRRL B21061.
47. The nucleotide sequence of claim 36, wherein said sequence is contained in E. coli clone pCIB 6022 having Accession No. NRRL B21222.
48. The nucleotide sequence of claim 54 wherein said sequence is given as VEPl in SEQ ID NO:l.
49. An auxiliary protein which enhances the pesticidal activity of a pesticidal protein.
50. The auxiliary protein of claim 56 wherein said pesticidal protein is from Bacillus.
51. The auxiliary protein of claim 57 wherein said pesticidal protein is from B. cereus.
52. The auxiliary protein of claim 58 wherein said pesticidal protein is from strain AB78.
53. The auxiliary protein of claim 56 wherein said auxiliary protein is from Bacillus.
54. The auxiliary protein of claim 60 wherein said auxiliary protein is from B. cereus.
55. The auxiliary protein of claim 61 wherein said auxiliary protein is from strain AB78.
56. A substantially pure nucleotide sequence which encodes the auxiliary protein of any one of claims 56, 60, 61, and 62.
57. The nucleotide sequence of claim 63 wherein said sequence is contained in E. coli clone pCIB6022 having Accession No. NRRL B21222.
58. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said strain is AB88 having Accession No. NRRL B21225.
59. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said strain is AB289 having Accession No. NRRL B21227.
60. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said strain is AB294 having Accession No. NRRL B21229.
61. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said strain is AB359 having Accession No. NRRL B21226.
62. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said strain is AB59 having Accession No. NRRL B21228.
63. The Bacillus strain of claim 1 wherein said strain is AB256 having Accession No. NRRL B21230.
Description:
NOVEL PESTICIDAL PROTEINS AND STRAINS

The present invention is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application serial number 08/037,057 filed March 25, 1993, the disclosures of which are herein incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is drawn to methods and compositions for controlling plant and non-plant pests.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Insect pests are a major factor in the loss of the world's commercially important agricultural crops. Broad spectrum chemical pesticides have been used extensively to control or eradicate pests of agricultural importance. There is, however, substantial interest in developing effective alternative pesticides.

Microbial pesticides have played an important role as alternatives to chemical pest control. The most extensively used microbial product is based on the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Bt is a gram-positive spore forming Bacillus which produces an insecticidal crystal protein (ICP) during sporulation. Numerous varieties of Bt are known that produce more than 25 different but related

ICP's. The ICP's made by Bt are toxic to larvae of certain insects in the orders Lepidoptera.

Diptera and Coleoptera. In general, when the ICP is ingested by a susceptible insect the crystal is solubilized and transformed into a toxic moiety by the insect gut proteases. None of the ICP's active against coleopteran larvae have demonstrated significant effects on the genus Diabrotica particularly Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. the western com rootworm (WCRW) or Diabrotica longicornis barberi. the northern corn rootworm.

Bt is closely related to Bacillus cereus (Be). A major distinguishing characteristic is the lack of a parasporal crystal in Be. Be is a widely distributed bacterium that is commonly found in soil and has been isolated from a variety of foods and drugs. The organism has been implicated in the spoilage of food. Although Bt has been very useful in controlling insect pests, there is a need to expand the number of potential biological control agents.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is drawn to compositions and methods for controlling plant and non-plant pests. Particularly, new pesticidal proteins are disclosed which are isolatable from the vegetative growth stage of Bacillus. Bacillus strains, proteins, and genes encoding the proteins are provided.

The methods and compositions of the invention may be used in a variety of systems for controlling plant and non-plant pests.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Compositions and methods for controlling plant pests are provided. In particular, novel pesticidal proteins are provided which are produced during vegetative growth of Bacillus strains. The proteins are useful as pesticidal agents.

The present invention recognizes that pesticidal proteins are produced during vegetative growth of Bacillus strains. For the purpose of the present invention vegetative growth is defined as that period of time before the onset of sporulation. In the case of Bt, this vegetative growth occurs before production of ICPs. Genes encoding such proteins can be isolated, cloned and transformed into various delivery vehicles for use in pest management programs.

For purposes of the present invention, pests include but are not limited to insects, fungi, bacteria, nematodes, mites, ticks, protozoan pathogens, animal-parasitic liver flukes, and the like. Insect pests include insects selected from the orders Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Mallophaga, Homoptera, Hemiptera, Orthroptera, Thysanoptera, Dermaptera, Isoptera, Anoplura, Siphonaptera, Trichoptera, etc.

Tables 1 - 10 gives a list of pests associated with major crop plants and pests of human and veterinary importance. Such pests are included within the scope of the present invention.

TABLE 1

Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths^)

Maize Sunflower Ostrinia nubilalis. European com borer 35 Suleima helianthana. sunflower bud moth Agrotis ipsilon. black cutworm Homoeosoma electellum. sunflower moth Helicoverpa zea. com earworm Spodoptera frugiperda. fall army worm Cotton Diatraea grandiosella. southwestern corn Heliothis virescens. cotton boll worm borer 40 Helicoverpa zea. cotton bollworm Elasmopalpus lignosellus. lesser comstalk Spodoptera exigua. beet armyworm borer Pectinophora gossypiella. pink bollworm Diatraea saccharalis. sugarcane borer

Rice

Sorghum 45 Diatraea saccharalis. sugarcane borer Chilo partellus. sorghum borer Spodoptera frugiperda. fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda. fall army worm Helicoverpa zea. com earworm Helicoverpa zea. com earworm Elasmopalpus lignosellus. lesser comstalk Soybean borer 50 Pseudoplusia includens. soybean looper

Feltia subterranea. granulate cutworm Anticarsia gemmatalis. velvetbean caterpillar

Wheat Plathypena scabra, green cloverworm Pseudaletia unipunctata. army worm Ostrinia nubilalis. European co borer Spodoptera frugiperda. fall army worm 55 Agrotis ipsilon. black cutworm Elasmopalpus lignosellus. lesser comstalk Spodoptera exigua. beet armyworm borer Heliothis virescens. cotton boll worm Agrotis orthogoma. pale western cutworm Helicoverpa zea. cotton bollworm Elasmopalpus lignosellus. lesser comstalk borer 60 Barley Ostrinia nubilalis. European com borer Agrotis ipsilon. black cutworm

TABLE 2

Coleoptera (Beetles)

Maize Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. western com rootworm

Diabrotica longicornis barberi. northern com rootworm Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi. southern com rootworm Melanotus spp.. wireworms

Cvclocephala borealis. northern masked chafer (white grub) Cyclocephala immaculata. southern masked chafer (white grub)

Popillia japonica. Japanese beetle Chaetocnema pulicaria. corn flea beetle Sphenophorus maidis. maize billbug Sorghum

Phyllophaga crinita. white grub

Eleodes. Conoderus. and Aeolus spp.. wireworms

Oulema melanopus. cereal leaf beetle

Chaetocnema pulicaria. com flea beetle Sphenophorus maidis. maize billbug

Wheat

Oulema melanopus. cereal leaf beetle Hypera punctata. clover leaf weevil Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi. southern com rootworm

Sunflower

Zygogramma exclamationis. sunflower beetle Bothyrus gibbosus. carrot beetle

Cotton

Anthonomus grandis. boll weevil

Rice Colaspis brunnea. grape colaspis

Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus. rice water weevil Sitophilus oryzae. rice weevil

Soybean Epilachna varivestis. Mexican bean beetle

TABLE 3

Homoptera (Whiteflies. Aphids etc.

Maize

Rhopalosiphum maidis. com leaf aphid Anuraphis maidiradicis. com root aphid

Sorghum Rhopalosiphum maidis. com leaf aphid

Sipha flava. yellow sugarcane aphid

Wheat

Russian wheat aphid Schizaphis graminum. greenbug

Macrosiphum avenae. English grain aphid

Cotton

Aphis gossypii. cotton aphid Pseudatomoscelis seriatus. cotton fleahopper

Trialeurodes aburilonea. bandedwinged whitefly

Rice

Nephotettix nigropictus. rice leafhopper

Soybean

Myzus persicae. green peach aphid Empoasca fabae. potato leafhopper Barley

Schizaphis graminum, greenbug

Oil Seed Rape

Brevicoryne brassicae, cabbage aphid

TABLE 4

Hemiptera (Bugs)

Maize

Blissus leucoptems leucoptems. chinch bug

Sorghum

Blissus leucoptems leucoptems. chinch bug

Cotton

Lygus lineolaris. tarnished plant bug

Rice Blissus leucoptems leucoptems. chinch bug

Acrosternum hilare. green stink bug

Soybean

Acrosternum hilare. green stink bug

Barley

Blissus leucoptems leucoptems. chinch bug Acrosternum hilare. green stink bug Euschistus servus. brown stink bug

TABLE 5

Orthoptera (Grasshoppers. Crickets, and Cockroaches)

Maize Melanoplus femurrubrum. redlegged grasshopper

Melanoplus sanguinipes. migratory grasshopper

Wheat

Melanoplus femurrubrum. redlegged grasshopper Melanoplus differentialis. differential grasshopper

Melanoplus sanguinipes. migratory grasshopper

Cotton

Melanoplus femurrubrum. redlegged grasshopper Melanoplus differentialis. differential grasshopper

Soybean

Melanoplus femurrubrum. redlegged grasshopper Melanoplus differentialis. differential grasshopper

Structural/Household

Periplaneta americana. American cockroach Blattella germanica. German cockroach Blatta orientalis. oriental cockroach

TABLE 6

Diptera (Flies and Mosquitoes)

Maize

Hylemya platura. seedcom maggot Agromyza parvicomis. com blotch leafminer

Sorghum

Contarinia sorghicola. sorghum midge

Wheat

Mayetiola destructor. Hessian fly Sitodiplosis mosellana. wheat midge Meromyza americana. wheat stem maggot Hylemya coarctata. wheat bulb fly

Sunflower

Neolasioptera murtfeldtiana. sunflower seed midge Soybean

Hylemya platura. seedcom maggot

Barley

Hylemya platura. seedcom maggot Mayetiola destructor. Hessian fly

Insects attacking humans and animals and disease carriers Aedes aegypti. yellowfever mosquito Aedes albopictus. forest day mosquito Phlebotomus papatasii. sand fly

Musca domestica. house fly Tabanus atratus. black horse fly Cochliomyia hominivorax. screwworm fly

TABLE 7

Thysanoptera (Thrips

Maize Anaphothrips obscums. grass thrips

Wheat

Frankliniella fusca. tobacco thrips Cotton

Thrips tabaci, onion thrips Frankliniella fusca. tobacco thrips

Soybean Sericothrips variabilis. soybean thrips

Thrips tabaci. onion thrips

TABLE 8

Hymenoptera (Sawflies. Ants. Wasps, etc.)

Maize Solenopsis milesta. thief ant

Wheat

Cephus cinctus. wheat stem sawfly

X BLE 9

Other Orders and Representative Species

Dermaptera (Earwigs) Forficula auricularia. European earwig

Isoptera (Termites)

Reticulitermes flavipes. eastern subterranean termite Mallophaga (Chewing Lice)

Cuclotogaster heterographa. chicken head louse Bovicola bovis. cattle biting louse

Anoplura (Sucking Lice) Pediculus humanus. head and body louse

Siphonaptera (Fleas)

Ctenocephalides felis. cat flea

TABLE 10

Acari (Mites and Ticks

Maize

Tetranychus urticae. twospotted spider mite

Sorghum

Tetranychus cinnabarinus. carmine spider mite Tetranychus urticae. twospotted spider mite

Wheat

Aceria tulipae. wheat curl mite

Cotton Tetranychus cinnabarinus. carmine spider mite

Tetranychus urticae. twospotted spider mite

Soybean

Tetranychus turkestani. strawberry spider mite Tetranychus urticae. twospotted spider mite

Barley

Petrobia latens. brown wheat mite Important human and animal Acari

Demacentor variabilis. American dog tick

Argas persicus. fowl tick

Dermatophagoides farinae. American house dust mite

Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. European house dust mite

Now that it has been recognized that pesticidal proteins can be isolated from the vegetative growth phase of Bacillus, other strains can be isolated by standard techniques and tested for activity against particular plant and non-plant pests. Generally Bacillus strains can be isolated from any environmental sample, including soil, plant, insect, grain elevator dust, and other sample material, etc., by methods known in the art. See, for example, Travers et al. (1987) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:1263-1266; Saleh et al. (1969) Can J. Microbiol. 15:1101-1104; DeLucca et al. (1981) Can J. Microbiol. 27:865-870; and Norris, et al. (1981) "The genera Bacillus and Sporolactobacillus." In Starr et al. (eds.), The Prokaryotes: A Handbook on Habitats, Isolation, and Identification of Bacteria, Vol. II, Springer-Verlog Berlin Heidelberg. After isolation, strains can be tested for pesticidal activity during vegetative growth. In this manner, new pesticidal proteins and strains can be identified.

Such Bacillus microorganisms which find use in the invention include Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. as well as those Bacillus species listed in Table 11.

TABLE 11

List of Bacillus species

Morphological Group 1 Unassigned Strains B. megaterium Subgroup A

B. cereus* B. apiarus*

B. cereus var. mycoides 35 B. filicolonicus B. thuringiensis* B. thiaminolyticus B. licheniformis B. alcalophilus B. subtilis*

B. pumilus Subgroup B B. firmus* 40 B. cirroflagellosus B. coagulans B. chitinospoms B. lentus Morphological Group 2

B. polymyxa Subgroup C

B. macerans 45 B. badius

B. circulans B. aneurinolyticus

B. stearothermophilus B. macroides B. alvei* B. freundenreichii

B. laterospoms*

B. brevis 50 Subgroup D

B. pulvifaciens B. pantothenticus

B. popilliae* B. epiphytus B. lentimorbus*

B. laiΥae* Subgroup El 55 B. aminovorans

Morphological Group 3 B. globisporus B. sphaericus* B. insolitus B. pasteurii B. psychrophilus

60 Subgroup E2

B. psychrosaccharolyticus B. macquariensis

*=Those Bacillus strains that have been previously found in insects Grouping according to Parry, J.M. et al. (1983) Color Atlas of Bacillus species, Wolfe Medical Publications, London.

In accordance with the present invention, the pesticidal proteins produced during vegetative growth can be isolated from Bacillus. In one embodiment, insecticidal proteins produced during vegetative growth, herein after referred to as VIP's (Vegetative Insecticidal Protein), can be isolated. Methods for protein isolation are known in the art. Generally, proteins can be purified by conventional chromatography, including gel-filtration, ion-exchange, and immunoaffinity chromatography, by high-performance liquid chromatography, such as reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography, high-performance chromatofocusing and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, etc., by electrophoretic separation, such as one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, etc. Such methods are known in the art. See for example Current Protocols in Molecular Biology. Vols. 1 and 2, Ausubel et al. (eds.), John Wiley & Sons, NY (1988). Additionally, antibodies can be prepared against substantially pure preparations of the protein. See, for example, Radka et al. (1983) I Immunol. 128:2804; and Radka et al. (1984) Immunogenetics 19:63. Any combination of methods may be utilized to purify protein having pesticidal properties. As the protocol is being formulated, pesticidal activity is determined after each purification step.

Such purification steps will result in a substantially purified protein fraction. By "substantially purified" or "substantially pure" is intended protein which is substantially free of any compound normally associated with the protein in its natural state. "Substantially pure" preparations of protein can be assessed by the absence of other detectable protein bands following SDS-PAGE as determined visually or by densitometry scanning. Alternatively, the absence of other ammo-terminal sequences or N-terminal residues in a purified preparation can indicate the level of purity. Purity can be verified by rechromatography of "pure" preparations showing the absence of other peaks by ion exchange, reverse phase or capillary electrophoresis.

The terms "substantially pure" or "substantially purified" are not meant to exclude artificial or synthetic mixtures of the proteins with other compounds. The terms are also not meant to exclude the presence of minor impurities which do not interfere with the biological activity of the protein, and which may be present, for example, due to incomplete purification. Some proteins are single polypeptide chains while many proteins consist of more than one polypeptide chain. Once purified protein is isolated, the protein, or the polypeptides of which it is comprised, can be characterized and sequenced by standard methods known in the art. For example, the purified protein, or the polypeptides of which it is comprised, may be fragmented as with cyanogen bromide, or with proteases such as papain, chymotrypsin, trypsin, lysyl-C endopeptidase, etc. (Oike et al. (1982) i Biol. Chem. 257:9751-9758; Liu et al. (1983) Int. J. Pept. Protein Res. 21 :209-215). The resulting peptides are separated, preferably by HPLC, or by resolution of gels and electroblotting onto PVDF membranes, and subjected to amino acid sequencing. To accomplish this task, the peptides are preferably analyzed by automated sequenators. It is recognized that N-terminal, C-terminal, or internal amino acid sequences can be determined. From the amino acid sequence of the purified protein, a nucleotide sequence can be synthesized which can be used as a probe to aid in the isolation of the gene encoding the pesticidal protein.

It is recognized that the proteins will vary in molecular weight, component peptides, activity against particular pests, and in other characteristics. However, by the methods set forth herein, proteins active against a variety of pests may be isolated and characterized.

Once the purified protein has been isolated and characterized it is recognized that it may be altered in various ways including amino acid substitutions, deletions, and insertions. Methods for such manipulations are generally known in the art. For example, amino acid sequence variants of the pesticidal proteins can be prepared by mutations in the DNA. Such variants will possess the desired pesticidal activity. Obviously, the mutations that will be made in the DNA

encoding the variant must not place the sequence out of reading frame and preferably will not create complementary regions that could produce secondary mRNA structure. See, EP Patent Application Publication No. 75,444.

In this manner, the present invention encompasses the pesticidal proteins as well as components and fragments thereof. That is, it is recognized that component polypeptides or fragments of the proteins may be produced which retain pesticidal activity. These fragments include truncated sequences, as well as N-terminal, C-terrninal, internal and internally deleted amino acid sequences of the proteins.

Most deletions, insertions, and substitutions of the protein sequence are not expected to produce radical changes in the characteristics of the pesticidal protein. However, when it is difficult to predict the exact effect of the substitution, deletion, or insertion in advance of doing so, one skilled in the art will appreciate that the effect will be evaluated by routine screening assays.

The proteins or other component polypeptides described herein may be used alone or in combination. That is, several proteins may be used to control different insect pests.

Additionally, certain of the proteins of the invention enhance the activity of the pesticidal proteins. These proteins are referred to herein as "auxiliary proteins." While the mechanism of action is not entirely certain, when the auxiliary protein and the pesticidal protein of interest are together, the insecticidal properties of the pesticidal protein are enhanced several fold. The pesticidal proteins of the present invention may vary in molecular weight, having component polypeptides at least a molecular weight of 30 kDa or greater, preferably about 50 kDa or greater.

The auxiliary proteins of the invention may vary in molecular weight, having at least a molecular weight of about 15 kDa or greater, preferably about 20 kDa or greater. The auxiliary proteins themselves may have component polypeptides.

It is possible that the pesticidal protein and the auxilary protein may be components of a multimeric, pesticidal protein. Such a pesticidal protein which includes the auxiliary proteins as one or more of its component polypeptides may vary in molecular weight, having at least a molecular weight of 50 kDa up to at least 200 kDa, preferably about 100 kDa to 150 kDa. An auxiliary protein may be used in combination with the pesticidal proteins of the invention to enhance activity. To determine whether the auxiliary protein will affect activity, the pesticidal protein can be expressed alone and in combination with the auxiliary protein and the respective activities compared in feeding assays for increased pesticidal activity.

It may be beneficial to screen strains for potential pesticidal activity by testing activity of the strain alone and in combination with the auxiliary protein. In some instances the auxiliary protein with the native proteins of the strains yields pesticidal activity where none is seen in the absence of the auxiliary protein.

The auxiliary protein can be modified, as described above, by various methods known in the art. Therefore, for purposes of the invention, the term "Vegetative Insecticidal Protein" (VLP) encompasses those proteins produced during vegetative growth which alone or in combination can be used for pesticidal activity. This includes pesticidal proteins, auxiliary proteins and those proteins which demonstrate activity only in the presence of the auxiliary protein or the polypeptide components of these proteins.

It is recognized that there are alternative methods available to obtain the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the present proteins. For example, to obtain the nucleotide sequence encoding the pesticidal protein, cosmid clones, which express the pesticidal protein, can be isolated from a genomic library. From larger active cosmid clones, smaller subclones can be made and tested for activity. In this manner, clones which express an active pesticidal protein can be sequenced to determine the nucleotide sequence of the gene. Then, an amino acid sequence can be deduced for the protein. For general molecular methods, see, for example,

Molecular Cloning, A Laboratory Manual, Second Edition, Vols. 1-3, Sambrook et al. (eds.) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY (1989), and the references cited therein.

The present invention also encompasses nucleotide sequences from organisms other than Bacillus, where the nucleotide sequences are isolatable by hybridization with the Bacillus nucleotide sequences of the invention. Such nucleotide sequences can be tested for pesticidal activity. The invention also encompasses the proteins encoded by the nucleotide sequences. Furthermore, the invention encompasses proteins obtained from organisms other than Bacillus wherein the protein cross-reacts with antibodies raised against the proteins of the invention. Again the isolated proteins can be assayed for pesticidal activity by the methods disclosed herein.

Once the nucleotide sequences encoding the pesticidal proteins of the invention have been isolated, they can be manipulated and used to express the protein in a variety of hosts including other organisms, including microorganisms and plants. The pesticidal genes of the invention can be optimized for enhanced expression in plants.

See, for example U.S. Application Serial No. 07/951,715; EPA 0359472; EPA 0385962; WO 91/16432; Perlak et al (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sri. USA 88:3324-3328; and Murray et al (1989) Nucleic Acids Research 17: 477-498. In this manner, the genes can be synthesized utilizing plant preferred codons. That is the preferred codon for a particular host is the single codon which most frequently encodes that amino acid in that host. The maize preferred codon, for example, for a particular amino acid may be derived from known gene sequences from maize. Maize codon usage for 28 genes from maize plants is found in Murray et al. (1989), Nucleic Acids Research 17:477-498, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. Synthetic genes could also be made based on the distribution of codons a particular host uses for a particular amino acid.

In this manner, the nucleotide sequences can be optimized for expression in any plant. It is recognized that all or any part of the gene sequence may be optimized or synthetic. That is, synthetic or partially optimized sequences may also be used.

In like manner, the nucleotide sequences can be optimized for expression in any microorganism. For Bacillus preferred codon usage, see, for example US Patent No. 5,024,837 and Johansen et al (1988) Gene 65:293-304.

Methodologies for the construction of plant expression cassettes as well as the introduction of foreign DNA into plants are described in the art. Such expression cassettes may include promoters, terminators, enhancers, leader sequences, introns and other regulatory sequences operably linked to the pesticidal protein coding sequence.

Generally, for the introduction of foreign DNA into plants Ti plasmid vectors have been utilized for the delivery of foreign DNA as well as direct DNA uptake, liposomes, electroporation, micro-injection, and the use of microprojectiles. Such methods had been published in the art. See, for example, Guerche et al., (1987) Plant Science 52:111-116; Neuhause et al., (1987) Theor. Appl. Genet. 75:30-36; Klein et al., (1987) Nature 327: 70-73; Howell et al., (1980) Science 208:1265; Horsch et al., (1985) Science 227: 1229-1231; DeBlock et al., (1989) Plant Physiology 91 :694-701 : Methods for Plant Molecular Biology (Weissbach and Weissbach, eds.) Academic Press, Inc. (1988); and Methods in Plant Molecular Biology (Schuler and Zielinski, eds.) Academic Press, Inc. (1989). See also US patent Application Serial No. 08/008,374 herein incorporated by reference. See also, EPA 0193259 and EPA 0451878A1. It is understood that the method of transformation will depend upon the plant cell to be transformed.

It is further recognized that the components of the expression cassette may be modified to increase expression. For example, truncated sequences, nucleotide substitutions or other modifications may be employed. See, for example Perlak et al. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.

USA 88:3324-3328; Murray et al. (1989) Nucleic Acids Research 17:477-498; and WO 91/16432.

The construct may also include any other necessary regulators such as terminators,(Guerineau et al., (1991), Mol. Gen. Genet.. 226:141-144; Proudfoot, (1991), CeU, 64:671-674; Sanfacon et al., (1991), Genes Dev..5:141-149; Mogen et al., (1990). Plant Cell. 2:1261-1272; Munroe et al.. (1990). Gene. 91:151-158: Ballas et al.. (1989). Nucleic Acids Res.. 17:7891-7903; Joshi et al., (1987). Nucleic Acid Res.. 15:9627-9639); plant translational consensus sequences (Joshi, C.P., (1987), Nucleic Acids Research. 15:6643-6653), introns (Luehrsen and Walbot, (1991), Mol. Gen. Genet.. 225:81-93) and the like, operably linked to the nucleotide sequence. It may be beneficial to include 5' leader sequences in the expression cassette construct. Such leader sequences can act to enhance translation. Translational leaders are known in the art and include:

Picornavirus leaders, for example, EMCV leader (Encephalomyocarditis 5' noncoding region) (Elroy-Stein, O., Fuerst, T.R., and Moss, B. (1989) PNAS USA 86:6126-6130); Potyvirus leaders, for example, TEV leader (Tobacco Etch Virus) (Allison et al., (1986);

MDMV leader (Maize Dwarf Mosaic Vims); Virology. 154:9-20), and

Human immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (BiP), (Macejak, D.G., and Samow, P., (1991), Nature. 353:90-94;

Untranslated leader from the coat protein mRNA of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV RNA 4), (Jobling, S.A., and Gehrke, L., (1987), Nature. 325:622-625;

Tobacco mosaic vims leader (TMV), (Gallie, D.R. et al., (1989), Molecular Biology of RNA. pages 237-256; and

Maize Chlorotic Mottle Vims leader (MCMV) (Lommel, S.A. et al., (1991), Virology. 81:382-385. See also, Della-Cioppa et al., (1987), Plant Physiology. 84:965-968.

A plant terminator may be utilized in the expression cassette. See, Rosenberg et al., (1987), Gene. 56:125; Guerineau et al., (1991), Mol. Gen. Genet.. 226:141-144; Proudfoot, (1991), Cell, 64:671-674; Sanfacon et al., (1991), Genes Dev.. 5:141-149; Mogen et al., (1990), Plant Cell. 2:1261-1272; Munroe et al., (1990), Gene. 91:151-158; Ballas et al., (1989), Nucleic Acids Res.. 17:7891-7903; Joshi et al., (1987), Nucleic Acid Res.. 15:9627-9639.

For tissue specific expression, the nucleotide sequences of the invention can be operably linked to tissue specific promoters. See, for example, US Application Serial No. 07/951,715 herein incorporated by reference.

It is recognized that the genes encoding the pesticidal proteins can be used to transform insect pathogenic organisms. Such organisms include Baculoviruses, fungi, protozoa, bacteria and nematodes.

The Bacillus strains of the invention may be used for protecting agricultural crops and products from pests. Alternatively, a gene encoding the pesticide may be introduced via a suitable vector into a microbial host, and said host applied to the environment or plants or animals. Microorganism hosts may be selected which are known to occupy the "phytosphere" (phylloplane, phyllosphere, rhizosphere, and/or rhizoplana) of one or more crops of interest. These microorganisms are selected so as to be capable of successfully competing in the particular environment with the wild-type microorganisms, provide for stable maintenance and expression of the gene expressing the polypeptide pesticide, and, desirably, provide for improved protection of the pesticide from environmental degradation and inactivation.

Such microorganisms include bacteria, algae, and fungi. Ofparticular interest are microorganisms, such as bacteria, e.g..Pseudomonas. Erwinia. Serratia, Klebsiella. Xanthomonas. Streptomyces. Rhizobium. Rhodopseudomonas. Methylius. Agrobacterium. Acetobacter. Lactobacillus. Arthrobacter. Azotobacter. Leuconostoc. and Alcaligenes: fungi, particularly yeast, e.g..Saccharomyces. Cryptococcus. Kluyveromyces. Sporobolomyces.

Rhodotorula. and Aureobasidium. Ofparticular interest are such phytosphere bacterial species as Pseudomonas syringae. Pseudomonas fluorescens. Serratia marcescens. Acetobacter xylinum. Agrobacteria. Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. Xanthomonas campestris. Rhizobium melioti. Alcaligenes entrophus. Clavibacter xyli and Azotobacter vinlandii; and phytosphere yeast species such as Rhodotorula rubra. R. glutinis. R. marina. R. aurantiaca. Cryptococcus albidus. C. diffluens. C laurentii. Saccharomyces rosei. 53. pretoriensis. S. cerevisiae. Sporobolomyces rosues, S. odorus, Kluyveromyces veronae. and Aureobasidium pollulans. Of particular interest are the pigmented microorganisms.

A number of ways are available for introducing a gene expressing the pesticidal protein into the microorganism host under conditions which allow for stable maintenance and expression of the gene. For example, expression cassettes can be constructed which include the DNA constructs of interest operably linked with the transcriptional and translational regulatory signals for expression of the DNA constructs, and a DNA sequence homologous with a sequence in the host organism, whereby integration will occur, and/or a replication system which is functional in the host, whereby integration or stable maintenance will occur.

Transcriptional and translational regulatory signals include but are not limited to promoter, transcriptional initiation start site, operators, activators, enhancers, other regulatory elements, ribosomal binding sites, an initiation codon, termination signals, and the like. See, for example, US Patent 5,039,523; US Patent No. 4,853,331; EPO 0480762A2; Sambrook et al. supra: Molecular Cloning, a Laboratory Manual, Maniatis et al. (eds) Cold Spring Harbor

Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY (1982); Advanced Bacterial Genetics, Davis et al. (eds.) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY (1980); and the references cited therein.

Suitable host cells, where the pesticide-containing cells will be treated to prolong the activity of the toxin in the cell when the then treated cell is applied to the environment of the

target pest(s), may include either prokaryotes or eukaryotes, normally being limited to those cells which do not produce substances toxic to higher organisms, such as mammals. However, organisms which produce substances toxic to higher organisms could be used, where the toxin is unstable or the level of application sufficiently low as to avoid any possibility of toxicity to a mammalian host. As hosts, ofparticular interest will be the prokaryotes and the lower eukaryotes, such as fungi. Illustrative prokaryotes, both Gram-negative and -positive, include Enterobacteriaceae. such as Escherichia. Erwinia. Shigella. Salmonella, and Proteus: Bacillaceae: Rhizobiceae. such as Rhizobium: Spirillaceae. such as photobacterium, Zvmomonas. Serratia. Aeromonas. Vibrio. Desulfovibrio. Spirillum: Lactobacillaceae: Pseudomonadaceae. such as Pseudomonas and Acetobacter: Azotobacteraceae and

Nitrobacteraceae. Among eukaryotes are fungi, such as Phycomycetes and Ascomycetes. which includes yeast, such a Saccharomyces and Schizosaccharromyces: and Basidiomycetes yeast, such as Rhodotorula. Aureobasidium. Sporobolomyces. and the like.

Characteristics ofparticular interest in selecting a host cell for purposes of production include ease of introducing the protein gene into the host, availability of expression systems, efficiency of expression, stability of the protein in the host, and the presence of auxiliary genetic capabilities. Characteristics of interest for use as a pesticide microcapsule include protective qualities for the pesticide, such as thick cell walls, pigmentation, and intracellular packaging or formation of inclusion bodies; leaf affinity; lack of mammalian toxicity; attractiveness to pests for ingestion; ease of killing and fixing without damage to the toxin; and the like. Other considerations include ease of formulation and handling, economics, storage stability, and the like.

Host organisms ofparticular interest include yeast, such as Rhodotorula sp.. Aureobasidium sp.. Saccharomyces sp.. and Sporobolomyces sp.: phylloplane organisms such as Pseudomonas sp.. Erwinia sp. and Flavobacterium sp.: or such other organisms as Escherichia.

Lactobacillus sp.. Bacillus sp., and the like. Specific organisms include Pseudomonas aeurginosa. Pseudomonas fluorescens. Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bacillus thuringiensis. Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis. and the like.

General methods for employing the strains of the invention in pesticide control or in engineering other organisms as pesticidal agents are known in the art. See, for example US Patent No. 5,039,523 and EP 0480762A2.

The Bacillus strains of the invention or the microorganisms which have been genetically altered to contain the pesticidal gene and protein may be used for protecting agricultural crops and products from pests. In one aspect of the invention, whole, i.e., unlysed, cells of a toxin (pesticide)-producing organism are treated with reagents that prolong the activity of the toxin produced in the cell when the cell is applied to the environment of target pest(s).

Alternatively, the pesticides are produced by introducing a heterologous gene into a cellular host. Expression of the heterologous gene results, directly or indirectly, in the intracellular production and maintenance of the pesticide. These cells are then treated under conditions that prolong the activity of the toxin produced in the cell when the cell is applied to the environment of target pest(s). The resulting product retains the toxicity of the toxin. These naturally encapsulated pesticides may then be formulated in accordance with conventional techniques for application to the environment hosting a target pest, e.g., soil, water, and foliage of plants. See, for example EPA 0192319, and the references cited therein. The active ingredients of the present invention are normally applied in the form of compositions and can be applied to the crop area or plant to be treated, simultaneously or in succession, with other compounds. These compounds can be both fertilizers or micronutrient donors or other preparations that influence plant growth. They can also be selective herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, bactericides, nematicides, mollusicides or mixtures of several of these preparations, if desired, together with further agriculturally acceptable carriers, surfactants or

application-promoting adjuvants customarily employed in the art of formulation. Suitable carriers and adjuvants can be solid or liquid and correspond to the substances ordinarily employed in formulation technology, e.g. natural or regenerated mineral substances, solvents, dispersants, wetting agents, tackifiers, binders or fertilizers. Preferred methods of applying an active ingredient of the present invention or an agrochemical composition of the present invention which contains at least one of the pesticidal proteins produced by the bacterial strains of the present invention are leaf application, seed coating and soil application. The number of applications and the rate of application depend on the intensity of infestation by the coπesponding pest. In one embodiment of the invention a Bacillus cereus microorganism has been isolated which is capable of killing Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. and Diabrotica longicomis barberi. The novel B. cereus strain AB78 has been deposited in the Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection (NRRL), Northem Regional Research Center, 1815 North Univeristy Street, Peoria, IL 61604, USA and given Accession No. NRRL B-21058. A protein has been substantially purified from the B. cereus strain. Purification of the protein has been verified by SDS-PAGE and biological activity. The protein has a molecular weight of about 60 to about 100 kDa, particularly about 70 to about 90 kDa, more particularly about 80 kDa.

Ammo-terminal sequencing has revealed the N-terminal amino-acid sequence to be: NH2-Lys-Arg-Glu-πe-Asp-Glu-Asp-Thr-Asp-Thr-Asx-Gly-Asp-Ser- fle-Pro- (SEQ ID NO: 8) where Asx represents either Asp or Asn. The entire amino acid sequence is given in SEQ ID NO:7.

An oligonuleotide probe for the region of the gene encoding amino acids 3-9 of the NH2-terminus has been generated. The probe was synthesized based on the codon usage of a

Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene. The nucleotide sequence of the oligonucleotide probe used for Southern hybridizations was as follows:

5'- GAA ATT GAT CAA GAT ACN GAT -3' (SEQ ID NO:9) where N represents any base. In addition, the DNA probe for the Be AB78 VIP-1 gene described herein, permits the screening of any Bacillus strain or other organisms to determine whether the VIP-1 gene (or related gene) is naturally present or whether a particular transformed organism includes the VIP- 1 gene.

The invention now being generally described, the same will be better understood by reference to the following detailed examples that are provided for the purpose of illustration and are not to be considered limiting of the invention unless so specified.

EXPERIMENTAL

Example 1. AB78 Isolation and Characterization

Bacillus cereus strain AB78 was isolated as a plate contaminant in the laboratory on T3 media (per liter: 3 g tryptone, 2 g tryptose, 1.5 g yeast extract, 0.05 M sodium phosphate (pH 6.8), and 0.005 g MnC^; Travers, R.S. 1983). AB78 gave significant activity against western com rootworm. Antibiotic activity against gram-positive Bacillus spp. was also demonstrated (Table 12).

Table 12

Antibiotic activity of AB78 culture supernatant

Zone of inhibition(cm)

Bacteria tested AB78 Streptomycin

E. coli 0.0 3.0

B. megaterium 1.1 2.2 B. mvcoides 1.3 2.1 B. cereus CB 1.0 2.0

B. cereus 11950 1.3 2.1

B. cereus 14579 1.0 2.4

B. cereus AB78 0.0 2.2

Bt var. isrealensis 1.1 2.2

Bt var. tenebrionis 0.9 2.3

Morpholgical characteristics of AB78 are as follows: Vegetative rods straight, 3.1-5.0 mm long and 0.5-2.0 mm wide. Cells with rounded ends, single in short chains. Single subterminal, cylindical-oval, endospore formed per cell. No

parasporal crystal formed. Colonies opaque, erose, lobate and flat. No pigments produced. Cells motile. Flagella present.

Growth characteristics of AB78 are as follows:

Facultative anaerobe with optimum growth temperature of 21-30°C. Will grow at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 37°C. Will not grow above 40°C. Grows in 5-7% NaCl.

Table 13 provides the biochemical profile of AB78.

Table 13

Biochemical characteristics of B. cereus strain AB78.

Acid from L-arabinose Methylene blue reoxidized +

Gas from L-arabinose Nitrate reduced +

Acid from D-xylose NO3 reduced to NO2 +

Gas from D-xylose VP +

Acid from D-glucose + H2O2 decomposed +

Gas from D-glucose Indole -

Acid from lactose Tyrosine decomposed +

Gas from lactose Dihydroxiacetone -

Acid from sucrose Litmus milk acid -

Gas from sucrose Litmus milk coagulated -

Acid from D-mannitol Litmus milk alkaline

Gas from D-mannitol Litmus milk peptonized -

Proprionate utilization + Litmus milk reduced

Citrate utilization f Casein hydrolyzed +

Hippurate hydrolysis ■ iv Starch hydrolyzed +

Methylene blue reduced <- Gelatin Uquidified +

Lecithinase produced w

w= weak reaction

Example 2. Bacterial Culture

A subculture of Be strain AB78 was used to inoculate the following medium, known as TB broth:

Tryptone 12 g/i

Yeast Extract 24 g/i

Glycerol 4 ml/1

The potassium phosphate was added to the autoclaved broth after cooling. Flasks were incubated at 30°C on a rotary shaker at 250 rpm for 24 h.-36 h. The above procedure can be readily scaled up to large fermentors by procedures well known in the art.

During vegetative growth, usually 24-36 h. after starting the culture, AB78 bacteria were centrifuged from the culture supematant. The culture supematant containing the active protein was used in bioassays.

Example 3. Insect Bioassays

B. cereus strain AB78 was tested against various insects as described below. Western, Northern and Southern corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. D. longcornis barber! and D. undecempunctata howardi. respectively:, dilutions were made of AB78 culture supematant grown 24-36 h., mixed with molten artificial diet (Marrone et al.

(1985) X of Economic Entomology 78:290-293) and allowed to solidify. Solidified diet was cut and placed in dishes. Neonate larvae were placed on the diet and held at 30°C. Mortality was recorded after 6 days.

E. coH clone bioassay: E. coli was grown overnight in L-AmplOO at 37°C. Ten ml culture was sonicated 3X for 20 sec each. 500 ml of sonicated culture was added to molten western com rootworm diet.

Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa dece lineata: -dilutions in Triton X-100 (to give final concentration of 0.1% TX-100) were made of AB78 culture supematant grown 24-36 h. Five cm 2 potato leaf pieces were dipped into these dilutions, air dried, and placed on moistened filter paper in plastic dishes. Neonate larvae were placed on the leaf pieces and held at 30°C. Mortality was recorded after 3-5 days.

Yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor:- dilutions were made of AB78 culture supematant grown 24-36 h., mixed with molten artificial diet (Bioserv #F9240) and allowed to solidify. Solidified diet was cut and placed in plastic dishes. Neonate larvae were placed on the diet and held at 30°C. Mortality was recorded after 6-8 days.

European corn borer, black cutworm, tobacco budworm, tobacco horn worm and beet armyworm; Ostrinia nubilalis. Agrotis ipsilon. Heliothis virescens. Manduca sexta and Spodoptera exigua. respectively: -dilutions, in TX-100 (to give final concentration of 0.1% TX-100), were made of AB78 culture supematant grown 24-36 hrs. 100 ml was pipetted onto

2 the surface of 18 cm of solidified artifical diet (Bioserv #F9240) and allowed to air dry.

Neonate larvae were then placed onto the surface of the diet and held at 30°C. Mortality was recorded after 3-6 days.

Northern house mosquito, Culex pipienst-dilutions were made of AB78 culture supematant grown 24-36 h. 100 ml was pipetted into 10 ml water in a 30 ml plastic cup. Third

instar larvae were added to the water and held at room temperature. Mortality was recorded after 24-48 hours. The spectrum of entomocidal activity of AB78 is given in Table 14.

Table 14

Activity of AB78 culture supematant against various insect species

Insect species tested to date Order Activity Western com rootworm

(Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) Col +++

Northem com rootworm

(Diabrotica longicomis barberi) Col +++

Southern com rootworm

(Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi) Col

Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) Col

Yellow mealworm

(Tenebrio molitor) Col

European com borer

(Ostrinia nubilalis) Lep Tobacco budworm

(Heliothis virescens) Lep

Tobacco hornworm

(Manduca sexta) Lep

Beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) Lep

Black cutworm

(Agrotis ipsilon) Lep

Northem house mosquito

(Culex pipiens) Dip

The newly discovered B_. cereus strain AB78 showed a significantly different spectrum of insecticidal activity as compared to known coleopteran active δ-endotoxins from Bt. In particular, AB78 showed more selective activity against beetles than known coleopteran-active Bt strains in that it was specifically active to Diabrotica spp. More specifically, it was most active against D. virgifera virgifera and D. longicomis barberi but not D. undecimpunctata howardi.

A number of Bacillus strains were bioassayed for activity during vegetative growth (Table 15) against western com rootworm. The results demonstrate that AB78 is unique in that activity against western com rootworm is not a general phenomenon.

Table 15

Activity of culture supernatants from various Bacillus spp. against western com rootworm

Percent

Bacillus strain WCRW mortality

B. cereus AB78 (Bat.l) 100

B. cereus AB78 (Bat.2) 100

B. cereus (Carolina Bio.) 12

B. cereus ATCC 11950 12

B. cereus ATCC 14579 8

B. mvcoides (Carolina Bio.) 30

B. popilliae 28

B. thuringiensis HD135 41

B. thuringiensis HD191 9

B. thuringiensis GC91 4

B. thuringiensis isrealensis 24

Water Control 4

Specific activity of AB78 against westem com rootworm is provided in Table 16.

Table 16 Activity of AB78 culture supematant against neonate westem com rootworm

Culture supematant Percent concentration (μl/ml) WCRW mortality

100 100

25 87

10 80

5 40

2.5 20

1 6

0 0

The LCso was calculated to be 6.2 μl of culture supematant per ml of westem com rootworm diet.

Example 4. Isolation and Purification of Corn Rootworm Active Protein from AB78.

Culture media free of cells and debris was made to 70% saturation by the addition of solid ammonium sulfate i.e. (472 g/L). Dissolution was at room temperature followed by cooling in an ice bath and centrifugation at 10,000 x g for thirty minutes to pellet out the precipitated proteins.

The supematant was discarded and the pellet was dissoved in 1/10 the original volume with 20 mM TRIS-HCI at pH 7.5. The dissolved pellet was desalted either by dialysis in 20 mM TRIS HC1 pH 7.5, or passing through a desalting column.

The desalted material was titrated to pH 3.5 with 20 mM sodium citrate pH 2.5. Following a thirty minute room temperature incubation the solution was centrifuged at 3000 X g for ten minutes. The supematant at this stage contained the greatest amount of active protein.

Following neutralization of the pH to 7.0 the supematant was applied to a Mono-Q, anion exchange, column equilibrated with 20 mM TRIS pH 7.5 at a flow rate of 300 mL/min. The column was develped with a stepwise and linear gradient employing 400 mM NaCl in 20 mM TRIS pH 7.5.

Bioassay of the column fractions and SDS-PAGE analysis were used to confirm the active fractions. SDS-PAGE analysis identified the biologically active protein as having a molecular weight in the range of 80 kDa.

Example 5. Sequence Analysis of the Corn Rootworm Active Protein

The 80 kDa protein isolated by SDS-PAGE was transferred to PVDF membrane and was subjected to arnino-terminal sequencing as performed by repetitive Edman cycles on the ABI 470 pulsed-liquid sequencer. Transfer was carried out in 10 mM CAPS buffer with 10% methanol pH 11.0 as follows:

Incubation of the gel following electrophoresis was done in transfer buffer for five minutes. ProBlott PVDF membrane was wetted with 100% MeOH briefly then equilibrated in transfer buffer.

The sandwich was arranged between foam sponges and filter paper squares with the configuration of Cathode-Gel-Membrane- Anode.

Transfer was performed at 70 V constant voltage for 1 hour.

Following transfer the membrane was rinsed with water and stained for two minutes with 0.25% Coomassie Blue R-250 in 50% MeOH.

Destaining was done with several rinses with 50% MeOH 40% water 10% acetic acid.

Following destaining the membrane was air dried prior to excision of the bands for sequence analysis. A BlottCartridge and appropriate cycles were utilized to achieve maximum efficiency and yield. Data analysis was performed using the model 610 Sequence Analysis software for identifying and quantifying the PTH-amino acid derivatives for each sequential cycle.

The N-terminal sequence was determined to be: NH2-Lys-Arg-Glu-fie-Asp-Glu-Asp-Thr-Asp-Thr-Asx-Gly-Asp-Ser- He-Pro- (SEQ ID NO:8) where Asx represents Asp or Asn.

Example 6. Construction of DNA Probe

An oligonucleotide probe for the region of the gene encoding amino acids 3-9 of the N-terminal sequence (Example 5) was generated. The probe was synthesized based on the codon usage of a Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene. The nucleotide sequence

5'- GAA ATT GAT CAA GAT ACN GAT -3' (SEQ ID NO:9) was used as a probe in Southern hybridizations. The oligonucleotide was synthesized using standard procedures and equipment.

Example 7. Isoelectric Point Determination of the Corn Rootworm Active Protein

Purified protein from step 5 of the purification process was analyzed on a 3-9 pi isoelectric focusing gel using the Phastgel electrophoresis system (Pharmacia). Standard

operating procedures for the unit were followed for both the separation and silver staining development procedures. The pi was approximated at about 4.9.

Example 8. PCR Data On AB78

PCR analysis (See, for example US patent Application Serial No. 08/008,006; and, Carozzi et al. (1991) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57(11):3057-3061, herein incorporated by reference.) was used to verify that the B. cereus strain AB78 did not contain any insecticidal crystal protein genes of R thuringensis or R sphaericus (Table 17).

Table 17

Bacillus insecticidal crystal protein gene primers tested by PCR against AB78 DNA.

Primers Tested Product Produced

2 sets specific for CrylllA Negative

CrymB Negative

2 sets specific for CrylA Negative

CryΙA(a) Negative

CryIA(b) specific Negative

Cryffi Negative

CrylC specific Negative

CrylE specific Negative

2 sets specific for B. sphaericus Negative

2 sets specific for CrylV Negative

Bacillus control (PI-PLC) Positive

Example 9. Cosmid Cloning of Total DNA from B. cereus Strain AB78

The VTP-1 gene was cloned from total DNA prepared from strain AB78 as follows:

Isolation of AB78 DNA was as follows:

1. Grow bacteria in 10 ml L-broth overnight. (Use 50 ml sterile centrifuge tube)

2. Add 25 ml of fresh L-broth and ampicillin (30 mg/ml).

3. Grow cells 2-6 h. at 30°C with shaking. 4. Spin cells in a 50 ml polypropylene orange cap tube in IEC benchtop clinical centrifuge at 3/4 speed.

5. Resuspend cell pellet in 10 ml TES.

6. Add 30 mg lyzozyme and incubate 2 hrs at 37°C.

7. Add 200 ml 20% SDS and 400 ml Proteinase K (20 mg ml). Incubate at 37°C. 8. Add 200 ml fresh Proteinase K. Incubate 1 hr. at 55°C. Add 5 ml TES (TES = 50 mM tirs pH 8.0, lOOmM EDTA, 15 mM NaCl) to make 15 ml final volume. 9. Phenol extract twice (10 ml phenol, spin at room temperature at 3/4 speed in an IEC benchtop clinical centrifuge). Transfer supematant (top) to a clean tube with a wide bore pipet. 10. Extract once with 1:1 vol. phenol hloroform/isoamyl alcohol (24:1 ratio).

11. Precipitate DNA with an equal volume of cold isopropanol; Centrifuge to pellet DNA.

12. Resuspend pellet in 5 ml TE.

13. Precipitate DNA with 0.5 ml 3M NaOAc pH 5.2 and 11 ml 95% ethanol. Place at -20°C for 2 h.

14. "Hook" DNA from mbe with a plastic loop, transfer to a microfuge tube, spin, pipet off excess ethanol, dry in vacuo.

15. Resuspend in 0.5 ml TE. Incubate 90 min. at 65°C to help get DNA back into solution.

16. Determine concentration using standard procedures.

Cosmid Cloning of AB78

All procedures, unless indicated otherwise, were performed according to Stratagene Protocol, Supercos 1 Instruction Manual, Cat. No. 251301.

Generally, the steps were as follows: A. Sau 3 A Partial Digestion of the AB78 DNA.

B . Preparation of Vector DNA

C. Ligation and packaging of DNA

D. Titering the cosmid library

1. Start a culture of HB 101 cells by placing 50 ml of an overnight culture in 5 mis of TB with 0.2% maltose. Incubate 3.5 hrs. at 37°C.

2. Spin out cells and resuspend in 0.5 mis 10 mM MgSO 4 .

3. Add together: 100 ml cells

100 ml diluted packaging mixture lOO ml lO mM MgSOj t

30 ml TB

4. Adsorb at room temperature for 30 minutes with no shaking.

5. Add 1 ml TB and mix gently. Incubate 30 minutes at 37°C.

6. Plate 200 ml onto L-amp plates. Incubate at 37°C overnight.

At least 400 cosmid clones were screened for activity against westem com rootworm as described in Example 3. DNA from 5 active clones and 5 non-active clones were used in Southern hybridizations. Results demonstrated that hybridization using the above described oligonucleotide probe correlated with westem com rootworm activity (Table 18).

Cosmid clones P3-12 and P5-4 have been deposited with the Agricultural Research Service Patent Culture Collecton (NRRL) and given accession nos. B-21061 and B-21059 respectively.

Table 18 Activity of AB78 cosmid clones against western corn rootworm.

Mean

Clone nercent mortality (N=4)

Clones which hybridize with probe

Pl-73 47

Pl-83 64

P2-2 69

P3-12 85

P5-4 97

Clones which do not hybridize with probe

Pl-2 5

P3-8 4

P3-9 12

P3-18 0

P4-6 9

Example 10. Identification of a 6 kb region active against western corn rootworm.

DNA from P3-12 was partially digested with restriction enzyme Sau 3 A, and ligated into the E. coli vector pUC19 and transformed into E. coti. A DNA probe specific for the 80 kDa protein was synthesized by PCR amplification of a portion of P3- 12 DNA. The oligonucleotides MK113 and MK117, which hybridize to portions of VIP- 1, were synthesized using the partial amino acid sequence of the 80 kDa protein. Plasmid subclones were identified by colony hybridization to the PCR probe, and tested for activity against westem com rootworm. One such clone, PL2, hybridizes to the PCR fragment, and is active against westem com rootworm by the assay previously described.

A 6 kb Cla I restriction fragment from PL2 was cloned into the Sma I site of the E.coli- Bacillus shuttle vector pHT 3101 (Lereclus, D. et al, 1989, FEMS Microbiology Letters 60:211- 218) to yield pCIB6201. This construct confers anti- westem com rootworm activity upon both Bacillus and E.coli strains, in either orientation. pCIB6022 contains this same 6 kb Cla I fragment in pBluescript SK(+) (Stratagene), produces equivalent VEP-l protein (by westem blot), and is also active against westem com rootworm.

The nucleotide sequence of pCTP6022 was determined by the dideoxy termination method of Sanger et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 74:5463-5467 (1977), using PRISM Ready Reaction Dye Deoxy Terminator Cycle Sequencing Kits and PRISM Sequenase® Terminator Double-Stranded DNA Sequencing Kit and analyzed on ABI 373 automatic sequencer. The sequence is given in SEQ ID NO: 1. pCIB6022 was deposited with the Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection, (NRRL), Northem Regional Research Center, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, Illinois 61604, USA, and given the Accession No. NRRL B-21222.

Example 11. Functional dissection of the VIP-1 DNA region.

To confirm that the VtP-l open reading frame (ORF) is necessary for insecticidal activity a translational frameshift mutation was created in the gene. The restriction enzyme Bgl II recognizes a unique site located 1758 bp into the coding region of VIP- 1. pCIB6201 was digested with Bgl II, and the single-stranded ends filled-in with DNA polymerase (Klenow fragmnent) and dNTPS. The plasmid was re-ligated and transformed into R coli The resulting plasmid, pCIB6203, contains a four nucleotide insertion in the coding region of VEP-l. pCTB6203 does not confer insecticidal activity, con-firming that VIP-1 is an essential component of westem com rootworm activity.

To further define the region necessary to encode VIP-1, subclones of the VEP-l and VEP- 2 (auxiliary protein) region were constructed and tested for their ability to complement the mutation in pCIB6203. pCIB6023 contains the 3.7kb Xba I-EcoRV fragment in pBluescript SK(+) (Stratagene). Westem blot analysis indicates that pCIB6023 produces VEP-l protein of equal size and quantity as clones PL2 and pCIB 6022. pCEB6023 contains the entire gene for the 80kd protein. pCEB6023 was deposited with the Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection, (NRRL), Northem Regional Research Center, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, Illinois 61604, USA, and given the Accession No. NRRL B-21223. pCIB6023 shows some westem com rootworm activity. However, the level of activity is less than the activity of pCIB6022. A mixture of cells containing pCIB6203 (VIP- 1 -mutated, and VIP-2) and cells containing pCIB6023(only VEP-l) shows high activity against westem com rootworm. Thus, pCIB6023 must produce functional VtP-l gene product, and pCIB6203 must produce a functional VEP-2 gene product. These results suggest a requirement for additional gene product(s) from the VIP-2 region, in combination with VEP-l, to confer maximal westem com rootworm activity. See Table 19.

TABLE 19 Characterization of pCIB 6022

Construct^) Activity

— ested YS WCRTλ

RI B RV

VIP-1 /Z// — M 1 pC_B6022 +++ mat

V pCIB6023 +

pCIB6203

pCIB6203 + pCIB6023 +++

Boxed regions represent the extent of VIP-1. Light shading indicates the regions encoding the 80 kDa peptide observed in Bacillus. Dark shading represents the N-terminal amino acids predicted by the DNA sequence of VEP-l . Large "X" represents the location of the frameshift mutation introduced into VEP-l . Arrows represent constructs transcribed by the beta- galactosidase promoter. Restriction sites: C - Cla I; X - Xba I; S - Sea I; RI - Eco RI; B - Bgl H; RV - Eco RV.

Example 12. AB78 Antibody Production

Antibody production was initiated in 2 Lewis rats to allow for both the possibility of moving to production of hybridoma cell lines and also to produce enough serum for limited screening of cDNA library. Another factor was the very limited amount of antigen available and the fact that it could only be produced to purity by PAGE and subsequent electrotransfer to nitrocellulose.

Due to the limited availability of antigen on nitrocellulose, the nitrocellulose was emulsified in DMSO and injected into the hind footpads of the animals to elicit B-cell production in the popliteal lymph nodes just upstream. A strong reacting serum was produced by westem analysis within the first production bleed. Several subsequent injections and bleeds produced enough serum to accomplish all of the screening required.

Hybridoma production with one of the rats was then initiated. The popliteal lymph node was excised, macerated, and the resulting cells fused with mouise myeloma P3x63Ag8.653. Subsequent cell screening was accomplished as described below. Four initial wells were selected which gave the highest emulsified antigen reaction to be moved to limited dilution cloning. An additional 10 wells were chosen for expansion and cryoperservation.

Procedure to Emulsify AB78 on nitrocellulose in DMSO for ELISA screening: After electrotransfer of AB78 samples run on PAGE to nitrocellulose, the reversible strain Ponceaus is used to visualize all protein transferred. The band corresponding to AB78 toxin, previously identified and N-terminal sequenced, is identified and excised from nitrocellulose. Each band is approximately lmmx5mm in size to minimize the amount of nitrocellulose emulsified. A single band is placed in a microfuge tube with 250ul of DMSO and macerated using a plastic pestle (Kontes, Vineland, NJ). To aid in emulsification, the DMSO mixture is heated for 2-3 minutes at 37°C-45°C. Some further maceration might be necessary following heating; however, all of the nitrocellulose should be emulsified. Once the AB78 is

emulsified, the sample is placed on ice. In preparation for microtiter plate coating with the emulsified antigen, the sample must be diluted in borate buffered saline as follows: 1:5, 1:10, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30, 1:50, 1:100, and 0. The coating antigen must be prepared fresh immediately prior to use. ELISA protocol:

1. Coat with AB78/DMSO in BBS. Incubate overnight at 4°C.

2. Wash plate 3X with IX ELISA wash buffer.

3. Block (1% BSA & 0.05% Tween 20 in PBS) for 30 minutes at Room Temperature. 4. Wash plate 3X with IX ELISA wash buffer.

5. Add Rat Serum. Incubate 1.5 hours at 37°C.

6. Wash plate 3X with 1 X ELISA wash buffer.

7. Add Goat anti-Rat at a cone, of 2ug ml in ELISA diluent. Incubate 1 hr. at 37°C.

8. Wash plate 3X with IX ELISA wash buffer. 9. Add Rabbit anti-Goat Alkaline Phosphatase at 2ug/ml in ELISA diluent.

Incubate lHr. at 37°C.

10. Wash 3X with 1 X ELISA wash buffer.

11. Add Substrate. Incubate 30 minutes at Room Temperature.

12. Stop with 3N NaOH after 30 minutes.

Example 13. Activation of insecticidal activity of non-active Bt strains with AB78 VIP clones.

Adding pCIB6203 together with culture supematant from a Bt strain GC91 produces 100% mortality in Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. Neither pCIB6203 nor GC91 is active on Diabrotica virgifera virgifera by itself. Data are shown below:

Test material Percent Diabrotica mortality pCIB6203 0

GC91 16 pCIB6203 + GC91 100

Control 0

Example 14. Isolation and Biological Activity of B.cereus AB81.

A second B. cereus strain, designated AB81, was isolated from grain bin dust samples by standard methodologies. A subculture of AB81 was grown and prepared for bioassay as described in Example 2. Biological activity was evaluated as described in Example 3. The results are as follows:

Insect species Percent tested Mortality Ostrinia nubilalis 0

Agrotis ipsilon 0

Diabrotica virgifera virgifera 55

Example 15. Isolation and Biological Activity of B. thuringiensis AB6.

A B. thuringiensis strain, designated AB6, was isolated from grain bin dust samples by standard methods known in the art. A subculture of AB6 was grown and prepared for bioassay as described in Example 2. Half of the sample was autoclaved 15 minutes to test for the presence of β-exotoxin.

Biological activity was evaluated as described in Example 3. The results are as follows:

Insect species Percent tested Mortality

Ostrinia nubilalis 0

Agrotis ipsilon 100

Agrotis ipsilon (autoclaved sample) 0 Diabrotica virgifera virgifera 0

Strain AB6 has been deposited in the Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection (NRRL), Northem Regional Research Center, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, Illinois 61604, USA, and given Accession No. NRRL B-21060.

Example 16. Isolation and Biological characterization of B. thuringiensis AB88.

A Bt strain, designated AB88, was isolated from grain bin dust samples by standard methodologies. A subculture of AB88 was grown and prepared for bioassay as described in

Example 2. Half of the sample was autoclaved 15 minutes to test for the presence of β-exotoxin. Biological activity was evaluated against a number of insect species as described in Example 3. The results are as follows:

Percent mortality of culture supematant

Insect species tested Order Non-autoclaved Autoclaved

Agrotis ipsilon Lepidoptera 100 5

Ostrinia nubilalis Lepidoptera 100 0

Spodoptera frugiperda Lepidoptera 100 4

Helicoverpa zea Lepidoptera 100 12

Heliothis virescens Lepidoptera 100 12

Leptinotarsa decemlineata Coleoptera 0 0

Diabrotica virgifera vireifera Coleoptera 0 5

Delta-endotoxin crystals were purified from strain AB88 by standard methodologies. No activity from pure crystals was observed when bioassayed against Agrotis ipsilon.

Example 17. Purification of VIPs from Strain AB88:

Bacterial liquid culture was grown overnight at 30°C in TB media. Cells were spun out and the supematant kept. Proteins were precipitated with ammonium sulfate (70% saturation), centrifuged and the pellet kept. The pellet was resuspended in the original volume of 20 mM Tris pH 7.5 and dialyzed against the same buffer. AB88 dialysate was more turbid than comparable material from AB78. AB88 proteins have been separated by several different methods following clarification including isoelectric focusing (Rotofor, BioRad, Hercules, CA), precipitation at pH 4.5, ion-exchange chromotography, size exclusion chromatography and ultrafiltration.

European Com Borer-active protein remained in the pellet obtained by pH 4.5 precipitation of dialysate. When preparative IEF was done on the dialysate using pH 3-10 ampholytes, ECB insecticidal activity was found in all fractions with pH of 7 or greater. SDS- PAGE of these fractions showed protein bands of MW ~60 kDa and -80 kDa. The 60 kDa and 80 kDa bands were separated by anion exchange HPLC on a Poros-Q column (PerSeptive

Biosystems, Cambridge, MA). N-terminal sequence was obtained from two fractions containing proteins of slightly differing MW, but both of approximately 60 kDa in size. The sequences obtained were similar to each other and to some δ-endotoxins. anion exchange fraction 23 (smaller): xEPFVSAxxxQxxx (SEQ ED NO: 10) anion exchange fraction 28 (larger): xEYENVEPFVSAx (SEQ ID NO: 11)

When the (active) pH 4.5 pellet was further separated by anion exchange on a Poros-Q column, activity was found only in fractions with a major band of -60 kDa.

Black Cutworm-active protein also remained in the pellet when AB88 dialysate was brought down to pH 4.5. In preparative IEF using pH 3-10 ampholytes, actyivity was not found in the ECB-active IEF fractions; instead, it was highest in a fraction of pH 4.5-5.0. Its major components have molecular weights of -35 and -80 kDa.

The pH 4.5 pellet was separated by anion exchange HPLC to yield fractions containing only the 35 kDa material and fractions containing both 35 kDa and 80 kDa bands.

Example 18. Characterization of AB88 VIP.

Fractions containing the various lepidopteran active vegetative proteins were generated as described in Example 17. Analysis of active fractions demonstrates that different VIP's are responsible for the different lepidopteran species activity.

The Agrotis ipsilon activity is due to an 80 kDa and or a 35 kDa protein either delivered singly or in combination. These proteins are not related to any δ-endotoxins from Bt as evidenced by the lack of sequence homology of known Bt δ-endotoxin sequences. Also, these proteins are not found in the AB88 δ-endotoxin crystal. N-terminal sequences of the major δ-

endotoxin proteins were compared with the N-terminal sequences of the 80 kDa and 35 kDa VIP and reveal no sequence homology. A summary of the results follows:

Agrotis VIP N-terrninal sequences N-terminal sequence of major δ- endotoxin proteins

130 kDa

MDNNPNINE (SEQ ID NO: 14)

80 kDa 80 kDa

MNKNNTKLPTRALP (SEQ ID NO: 12) MDNNPNINE (SEQ ID NO: 15)

60 kDa

MNVLNSGRTTI (SEQ ID NO: 16)

35 kDa

ALSENTGKDGGYIVP (SEQ ID NO: 13)

The Ostrinia nubilalis activity is due to a 60 kDa VIP and the Spodoptera frugiperda activity is due to a VIP of unknown size.

Bacillus thuringiensis strain AB88 has been deposited in the Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection (NRRL), Northem Regional Research Center, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, Ilinois 61604, USA and given the Accession No. NRRL B-21225.

Example 19. Isolation and Biological Activity of Other Bacillus sp.

Other Bacillus species have been isolated which produce proteins with insecticidal activity during vegetative growth. These strains were isolated from environmental samples by standard methodologies. Isolates were prepared for bioassay and assayed as described in Examples 2 and 3 respectively. Isolates which produced insecticidal proteins during vegetative growth with activity against Agrotis ipsilon in the bioassay are tabulated below.

Presence of δ-endotoxin

Bacillus isolate crystal Percent mortality

AB6 + 100

AB53 - 80

AB88 + 100

AB195 - 60

AB211 - 70

AB217 - 83

AB272 - 80

AB279 - 70

AB289 + 100

AB292 + 80

AB294 - 100

AB300 - 80

AB359 - 100

Isolates AB289, AB294 and AB359 have been deposited in the Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection (NRRL), Northem Regional Research Center, 1815 North University Street, Peoria II 61604, USA and given the Accession Numbers NRRL B-21227, NRRL B-21229, and NRRL B-21226 respectively.

Bacillus isolates which produce insecticidal proteins during vegetative growth with activity against Diabrotica virgifera virgifera are tabulated below.

Presence of δ-endotoxin Bacillus isolate crystal Percent mortality

AB52 - 50

AB59 - 71

AB68 + 60

AB78 - 100

AB122 - 57

AB218 - 64

AB256 - 64

Isolates AB59 and AB256 have been deposited in the Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection (NRRL), Northern Regional Research Center, 1815 North University Street, Peoria Illinois 61604, USA, and given the Accession Numbers NRRL B-21228 and B-21230, respectively.

All publications and patent applications mentioned in this specification are indicative of the level of skill of those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains. All publications and patent applications are herein incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each individual publication or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.

The following deposits have been made at Agricultural Research Service, Patent Culture Collection (NRRL), Northem Regional Research Center, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, Illinois 61604, U.S.A.: 1. E. coli PL2 Accession No. NRRL B-21221

2. E. coli pCIB 6022 Accession No. NRRL B-21222

3. E. coli pCEB 6023 Accession No. NRRL B-21223

4. Bacillus thuringiensis HD73-78VIP Accession No. NRRL B-21224

5. Bacillus thuringiensis AB88 Accession No. NRRL B-21225 6. Bacillus thuringiensis AB359 Accession No. NRRL B-21226

7. Bacillus thuringiensis AB289 Accession No. NRRL B-21227

8. Bacillus sp. AB59 Accession No. NRRL B-21228

9. Bacillus sp. AB294 Accession No. NRRL B-21229

10. Bacillus sp. AB256 Accession No. NRRL B-21230 11. IL ≤oli P5-4 Accession No. NRRL B-21059

12. | cϋIi P3-12 Accession No. NRRL B-21061

13. Bacillus cereus AB78 Accession No. NRRL B-21058

14. Bacillus thuringiensis AB6 Accession No. NRRL B-21060

Although the foregoing invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it will be obvious that certain changes and modifications may be practiced within the scope of the appended claims.

SEQUENCE LISTING

(1) GENERAL INFORMATION:

(i) APPLICANT:

(A) NAME: CIBA-GEIGY AG

(B) STREET: Klybeckstrasse 141

(C) CITY: Basle

(E) COUNTRY: Switzerland

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : CH-4002

(G) TELEPHONE: (061) 696 11 11 (H) TELEFAX: (061) 696 79 76

(A) NAME: Gregory W. Warren

(B) STREET: 324 Bond Lake Drive

(C) CITY: Cary

(D) STATE: NC

(E) COUNTRY: USA

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : 27513

(A) NAME: Michael G. Koziel

(B) STREET: 509 Carolyn Court

(C) CITY: Cary

(D) STATE: NC

(E) COUNTRY: USA

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : 27511

(A) NAME: Martha A. Mullins

(B) STREET: 104 Countrybrook Lane

(C) CITY: Youngsville

(D) STATE: NC

(E) COUNTRY: USA

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : 27596

(A) NAME: Gordon J. Nye

(B) STREET: 1001 Bray Court

(C) CITY: Apex

(D) STATE: NC

(E) COUNTRY: USA

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : 27502

(A) NAME: Brian Carr

(B) STREET: 110 D Lady's Slipper Ct.

(C) CITY: Raleigh

(D) STATE: N.C.

(E) COUNTRY: U.S.A.

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : 27606

(A) NAME: Nalini Manaj Desai

(B) STREET: 107 Silverwood Lane

(C) CITY: Cary

(D) STATE: N.C.

(E) COUNTRY: U.S.A.

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : 27511

(A) NAME: N. Kristy Kostichka

(B) STREET: 5017 Wineberry Dr.

(C) CITY: Durham

(D) STATE: NC

(E) COUNTRY: USA

(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) : 27713

(ii) TITLE OF INVENTION: Novel Pesticidal Proteins and Strains (iii) NUMBER OF SEQUENCES: 18

(iv) COMPUTER READABLE FORM:

(A) MEDIUM TYPE: Floppy disk

(B) COMPUTER: IBM PC compatible

(C) OPERATING SYSTEM: PC-DOS/MS-DOS

(D) SOFTWARE: Patentln Release #1.0, Version #1.25 (EPO)

(vi) PRIOR APPLICATION DATA:

(A) APPLICATION NUMBER: US 08/037,057

(B) FILING DATE: 25-MAR-1993

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 1:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 6106 base pairs

(B) TYPE: nucleic acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus cereus

(B) STRAIN: AB78

(C) INDIVIDUAL ISOLATE: NRRL B-21058

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: CDS

(B) LOCATION: 1082..1810

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /product= "VIP-2"

/label= ORF-1

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: CDS

(B) LOCATION: 1925..2470

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /product= "VIP-2" /label= ORF-2

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 1:

ATCGATACAA TGTTGTTTTA CTTAGACCGG TAGTCTCTGT AATTTGTTTA ATGCTATATT 60

CTTTACTTTG ATACATTTTA ATAGCCATTT CAACCTTATC AGTATGTTTT TGTGGTCTTC 120

CTCCTTTTTT TCCACGAGCT CTAGCTGCGT TTAATCCTGT TTTGGTACGT TCGCTAATAA 180

TATCTCTTTC TAATTCTGCA ATACTTGCCA TCATTCGAAA GAAGAATTTC CCCATAGCAT 240

TAGAGGTATC AATGTTGTCA TGAATAGAAA TAAAATCTAC ACCTAGCTCT TTGAATTTTT 300

CACTTAACTC AATTAGGTGT TTTGTAGAGC GAGAAATTCG ATCAAGTTTG TAAACAACTA 360

TCTTATCGCC TTTACGTAAT ACTTTTAGCA ACTCTTCGAG TTGAGGGCGC TCTTTTTTTA 420

TTCCTGTTAT TTTCTCCTGA TATAGCCTTT CTACACCATA TTGTTGCAAA GCATCTATTT 480

GCATATCGAG ATTTTGTTCT TCTGTGCTGA CACGAGCATA ACCAAAAATC AAATTGGTTT 540

CACTTCCTAT CTAAATATAT CTATTAAAAT AGCACCAAAA ACCTTATTAA ATTAAAATAA 600

GGAACTTTGT TTTTGGATAT GGATTTTGGT ACTCAATATG GATGAGTTTT TAACGCTTTT 660

GTTAAAAAAC AAACAAGTGC CATAAACGGT CGTTTTTGGG ATGACATAAT AAATAATCTG 720

TTTGATTAAC CTAACCTTGT ATCCTTACAG CCCAGTTTTA TTTGTACTTC AACTGACTGA 780

ATATGAAAAC AACATGAAGG TTTCATAAAA TTTATATATT TTCCATAACG GATGCTCTAT 840

CTTTAGGTTA TAGTTAAATT ATAAGAAAAA AACAAACGGA GGGAGTGAAA AAAAGCATCT 900

TCTCTA AAT TTTACAGGCT CTTTAATAAG AAGGGGGGAG ATTAGATAAT AAATATGAAT 960

ATCTATCTAT AATTGTTTGC TTCTACAATA ACTTATCTAA CTTTCATATA CAACAACAAA 1020

ACAGACTAAA TCCAGATTGT ATATTCATTT TCAGTTGTTC CTTTATAAAA TAATTTCATA 1080

A ATG AAA AGA ATG GAG GGA AAG TTG TTT ATG GTG TCA AAA AAA TTA 1126 Met Lys Arg Met Glu Gly Lys Leu Phe Met Val Ser Lys Lys Leu 1 5 10 15

CAA GTA GTT ACT AAA ACT GTA TTG CTT AGT ACA GTT TTC TCT ATA TCT 1174 Gin Val Val Thr Lys Thr Val Leu Leu Ser Thr Val Phe Ser He Ser 20 25 30

TTA TTA AAT AAT GAA GTG ATA AAA GCT GAA CAA TTA AAT ATA AAT TCT 1222 Leu Leu Asn Asn Glu Val He Lys Ala Glu Gin Leu Asn He Asn Ser 35 40 45

CAA AGT AAA TAT ACT AAC TTG CAA AAT CTA AAA ATC ACT GAC AAG GTA 1270 Gin Ser Lys Tyr Thr Asn Leu Gin Asn Leu Lys He Thr Asp Lys Val 50 55 60

GAG GAT TTT AAA GAA GAT AAG GAA AAA GCG AAA GAA TGG GGG AAA GAA 1318 Glu Asp Phe Lys Glu Asp Lys Glu Lys Ala Lys Glu Trp Gly Lys Glu 65 70 75

AAA GAA AAA GAG TGG AAA CTA ACT GCT ACT GAA AAA GGA AAA ATG AAT 1366 Lys Glu Lys Glu Trp Lys Leu Thr Ala Thr Glu Lys Gly Lys Met Asn 80 85 90 95

AAT TTT TTA GAT AAT AAA AAT GAT ATA NAG ACA AAT TAT AAA GAA ATT 1414 Asn Phe Leu Asp Asn Lys Asn Asp He Xaa Thr Asn Tyr Lys Glu He 100 105 110

ACT TTT TCT ATG GCA GGC TCA TTT GAA GAT GAA ATA AAA GAT TTA AAA 1462 Thr Phe Ser Met Ala Gly Ser Phe Glu Asp Glu He Lys Asp Leu Lys 115 120 125

GAA ATT GAT AAG ATG TTT GAT AAA ACC AAT CTA TCA AAT TCT ATT ATC 1510 Glu He Asp Lys Met Phe Asp Lys Thr Asn Leu Ser Asn Ser He He 130 135 140

ACC TAT AAA AAT GTG GAA CCG ACA ACA ATT GGA TTT AAT AAA TCT TTA 1558 Thr Tyr Lys Asn Val Glu Pro Thr Thr He Gly Phe Asn Lys Ser Leu 145 150 155

ACA GAA GGT AAT ACG ATT AAT TCT GAT GCA ATG GCA CAG TTT AAA GAA 1606 Thr Glu Gly Asn Thr He Asn Ser Asp Ala Met Ala Gin Phe Lys Glu 160 165 170 175

CAA TTT TTA GAT AGG GAT ATT AAG TTT GAT AGT TAT CTA GAT ACG CAT 1654 Gin Phe Leu Asp Arg Asp He Lys Phe Asp Ser Tyr Leu Asp Thr His 180 185 190

TTA ACT GCT CAA CAA GTT TCC AGT AAA GAA AGA GTT ATT TTG AAG GTT 1702 Leu Thr Ala Gin Gin Val Ser Ser Lys Glu Arg Val He Leu Lys Val 195 200 205

ACG GTT CCG AGT GGG AAA GGT TCT ACT ACT CCA ACA AAA GCA GGT' GTC 1750 Thr Val Pro Ser Gly Lys Gly Ser Thr Thr Pro Thr Lys Ala Gly Val 210 215 220

ATT TTA AAT AAT AGT GAA TAC AAA ATG CTC ATT GAT AAT GGG TAT ATG 1798 He Leu Asn Asn Ser Glu Tyr Lys Met Leu He Asp Asn Gly Tyr Met 225 230 235

GTC CAT GTA GAT TAAGGTATCA AAAGTGGTGA AAAAAGGGGG TGGAGTGCCT 1850

Val His Val Asp

240

TACAAATTGA AGGGACTTTA AAAAAGAGTC TTGACTTTAA AAATGATATA AATGCTGAAG 1910

CGCATAGCTG GGGT ATG AAG AAT TAT GAA GAG TGG GCT AAA GAT TTA ACC 1960 Met Lys Asn Tyr Glu Glu Trp Ala Lys Asp Leu Thr 1 5 10

GAT TCG CAA AGG GAA GCT TTA GAT GGG TAT GCT AGG CAA GAT TAT AAA 2008 Asp Ser Gin Arg Glu Ala Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ala Arg Gin Asp Tyr Lys 15 20 25

GAA ATC AAT AAT TAT TTA AGA AAT CAA GGC GGA AGT GGA AAT GAA AAA 2056 Glu He Asn Asn Tyr Leu Arg Asn Gin Gly Gly Ser Gly Asn Glu Lys 30 35 40

CTA GAT GCT CAA ATA AAA AAT ATT TCT GAT GCT TTA GGG AAG AAA CCA 2104 Leu Asp Ala Gin He Lys Asn He Ser Asp Ala Leu Gly Lys Lys Pro 45 50 55 60

ATA CCG GAA AAT ATT ACT GTG TAT AGA TGG TGT GGC ATG CCG GAA TTT 2152 He Pro Glu Asn He Thr Val Tyr Arg Trp Cys Gly Met Pro Glu Phe 65 70 75

GGT TAT CAA ATT AGT GAT CCG TTA CCT TCT TTA AAA GAT TTT GAA GAA 2200 Gly Tyr Gin He Ser Asp Pro Leu Pro Ser Leu Lys Asp Phe Glu Glu 80 85 90

CAA TTT TTA AAT ACA ATC AAA GAA GAC AAA GGA TAT ATG AGT ACA AGC 2248 Gin Phe Leu Asn Thr He Lys Glu Asp Lys Gly Tyr Met Ser Thr Ser 95 100 105

TTA TCG AGT GAA CGT CTT GCA GCT TTT GGA TCT AGA AAA ATT ATA TTA 2296

Leu Ser Ser Glu Arg Leu Ala Ala Phe Gly Ser Arg Lys He He Leu 110 115 120

CGA TTA CAA GTT CCG AAA GGA AGT ACG GGT GCG TAT TTA AGT GCC ATT 2344 Arg Leu Gin Val Pro Lys Gly Ser Thr Gly Ala Tyr Leu Ser Ala He 125 130 135 140

GGT GGA TTT GCA AGT GAA AAA GAG ATC CTA CTT GAT AAA GAT AGT AAA 2392 Gly Gly Phe Ala Ser Glu Lys Glu He Leu Leu Asp Lys Asp Ser Lys 145 150 155

TAT CAT ATT GAT AAA GTA ACA GAG GTA ATT ATT AAA GGT GTT AAG CGA 2440 Tyr His He Asp Lys Val Thr Glu Val He He Lys Gly Val Lys Arg 160 165 170

TAT GTA GTG GAT GCA ACA TTA TTA ACA AAT TAAGGAGATG AAAAATATGA 2490 Tyr Val Val Asp Ala Thr Leu Leu Thr Asn 175 180

AGAAAAAGTT AGCAAGTGTT GTAACGTGTA CGTTATTAGC TCCTATGTTT TTGAATGGAA 2550

ATGTGAATGC TGTTTACGCA GACAGCAAAA CAAATCAAAT TTCTACAACA CAGAAAAATC 2610

AACAGAAAGA GATGGACCGA AAAGGATTAC TTGGGTATTA TTTCAAAGGA AAAGATTTTA 2670

GTAATCTTAC TATGTTTGCA CCGACACGTG ATAGTACTCT TATTTATGAT CAACAAACAG 2730

CAAATAAACT ATTAGATAAA AAACAACAAG AATATCAGTC TATTCGTTGG ATTGGTTTGA 2790

TTCAGAGTAA AGAAACGGGA GATTTCACAT TTAACTTATC TGAGGATGAA CAGGCAATTA 2850

TAGAAATCAA TGGGAAAATT ATTTCTAATA AAGGGAAAGA AAAGCAAGTT GTCCATTTAG 2910

AAAAAGGAAA ATTAGTTCCA ATCAAAATAG AGTATCAATC AGATACAAAA TTTAATATTG 2970

ACAGTAAAAC ATTTAAAGAA CTTAAATTAT TTAAAATAGA TAGTCAAAAC CAACCCCAGC 3030

AAGTCCAGCA AGATGAACTG AGAAATCCTG AATTTAACAA GAAAGAATCA CAGGAATTCT 3090

TAGCGAAACC ATCGAAAATA AATCTTTTCA CTCAAMAAAT GAAAAGGGAA ATTGATGAAG 3150

ACACGGATAC GGATGGGGAC TCTATTCCTG ACCTTTGGGA AGAAAATGGG TATACGATTC 3210

AMAATAGAAT CGCTGTAAAG TGGGACGATT CTCTAGCAAG TAAAGGGTAT ACGAAATTTG 3270

TTTCAAATCC ACTAGAAAGT CACACAGTTG GTGATCCTTA TACAGATTAT GAAAAGGCAG 3330

CAAGAGATCT AGATTTGTCA AATGCAAAGG AAACGTTTAA CCCATTGGTA GCTGCTTTTC 3390

CAAGTGTGAA TGTTAGTATG GAAAAGGTGA TATTATCACC AAATGAAAAT TTATCCAATA 3450

GTGTAGAGTC TCATTCATCC ACGAATTGGT CTTATACAAA TACAGAAGGT GCTTCTGTTG 3510

AAGCGGGGAT TGGACCAAAA GGTATTTCGT TCGGAGTTAG CGTAAACTAT CAACACTCTG 3570

AAACAGTTGC ACAAGAATGG GGAACATCTA CAGGAAATAC TTCGCAATTC AATACGGCTT 3630

CAGCGGGATA TTTAAATGCA AATGTTCGAT ATAACAATGT AGGAACTGGT GCCATCTACG 3690

ATGTAAAACC TACAACAAGT TTTGTATTAA ATAACGATAC TATCGCAACT ATTACGGCGA 3750

AATCTAATTC TACAGCCTTA AATATATCTC CTGGAGAAAG TTACCCGAAA AAAGGACAAA 3810

ATGGAATCGC AATAACATCA ATGGATGATT TTAATTCCCA TCCGATTACA TTAAATAAAA 3870

AACAAGTAGA TAATCTGCTA AATAATAAAC CTATGATGTT GGAAACAAAC CAAACAGATG 3930

GTGTTTATAA GATAAAAGAT ACACATGGAA ATATAGTAAC TGGCGGAGAA TGGAATGGTG 3990

TCATACAACA AATCAAGGCT AAAACAGCGT CTATTATTGT GGATGATGGG GAACGTGTAG 4050

CAGAAAAACG TGTAGCGGCA AAAGATTATG AAAATCCAGA AGATAAAACA CCGTCTTTAA 4110

CTTTAAAAGA TGCCCTGAAG CTTTCATATC CAGATGAAAT AAAAGAAATA GAGGGATTAT 4170

TATATTATAA AAACAAACCG ATATACGAAT CGAGCGTTAT GACTTACTTA GATGAAAATA 4230

CAGCAAAAGA AGTGACCAAA CAATTAAATG ATACCACTGG GAAATTTAAA GATGTAAGTC 4290

ATTTATATGA TGTAAAACTG ACTCCAAAAA TGAATGTTAC AATCAAATTG TCTATACTTT 4350

ATGATAATGC TGAGTCTAAT GATAACTCAA TTGGTAAATG GACAAACACA AATATTGTTT 4410

CAGGTGGAAA TAACGGAAAA AAACAATATT CTTCTAATAA TCCGGATGCT AATTTGACAT 4470

TAAATACAGA TGCTCAAGAA AAATTAAATA AAAATCGTGA CTATTATATA AGTTTATATA 4530

TGAAGTCAGA AAAAAACACA CAATGTGAGA TTACTATAGA TGGGGAGATT TATCCGATCA 4590

CTACAAAAAC AGTGAATGTG AATAAAGACA ATTACAAAAG ATTAGATATT ATAGCTCATA 4650

ATATAAAAAG TAATCCAATT TCTTCACTTC ATATTAAAAC GAATGATGAA ATAACTTTAT 4710

TTTGGGATGA TATTTCTATA ACAGATGTAG CATCAATAAA ACCGGAAAAT TTAACAGATT 4770

CAGAAATTAA ACAGATTTAT AGTAGGTATG GTATTAAGTT AGAAGATGGA ATCCTTATTG 4830

ATAAAAAAGG TGGGATTCAT TATGGTGAAT TTATTAATGA AGCTAGTTTT AATATTGAAC 4890

CATTGCCAAA TTATGTGACC AAATATGAAG TTACTTATAG TAGTGAGTTA GGACCAAACG 4950

TGAGTGACAC ACTTGAAAGT GATAAAATTT ACAAGGATGG GACAATTAAA TTTGATTTTA 5010

CCAAATATAG TAAAAATGAA CAAGGATTAT TTTATGACAG TGGATTAAAT TGGGACTTTA 5070

AAATTAATGC TATTACTTAT GATGGTAAAG AGATGAATGT TTTTCATAGA TAT ATAAAT 5130

AGTTATTATA TCTATGAAGC TGGTGCTAAA GATAGTGTAA AAGTTAATAT ACTGTAGGAT 5190

TGTAATAAAA GTAATGGAAT TGATATCGTA CTTTGGAGTG GGGGATACTT TGTAAATAGT 5250

TCTATCAGAA ACATTAGACT AAGAAAAGTT ACTACCCCCA CTTGAAAATG AAGATTCAAC 5310

TGATTACAAA CAACCTGTTA AATATTATAA GGTTTTAACA AAATATTAAA CTCTTTATGT 5370

TAATACTGTA ATATAAAGAG TTTAATTGTA TTCAAATGAA GCTTTCCCAC AAAATTAGAC 5430

TGATTATCTA ATGAAATAAT CAGTCTAATT TTGTAGAACA GGTCTGGTAT TATTGTACGT 5490

GGTCACTAAA AGATATCTAA TATTATTGGG CAAGGCGTTC CATGATTGAA TCCTCGAATG 5550

TCTTGCCCTT TTCATTTATT TAAGAAGGAT TGTGGAGAAA TTATGGTTTA GATAATGAAG 5610

AAAGACTTCA CTTCTAATTT TTGATGTTAA ATAAATCAAA ATTTGGCGAT TCACATTGTT 5670

TAATCCACTG ATAAAACATA CTGGAGTGTT CTTAAAAAAT CAGCTTTTTT CTTTATAAAA 5730

TTTTGCTTAG CGTACGAAAT TCGTGTTTTG TTGGTGGGAC CCCATGCCCA TCAACTTAAG 5790

AGTAAATTAG TAATGAACTT TCGTTCATCT GGATTAAAAT AACCTCAAAT TAGGACATGT 5850

TTTTAAAAAT AAGCAGACCA AATAAGCCTA GAATAGGTAT CATTTTTAAA AATTATGCTG 5910

CTTTCTTTTG TTTTCCAAAT CCATTATACT CATAAGCAAC ACCCATAATG TCAAAGACTG 5970

TTTTTGTCTC ATATCGATAA GCTTGATATC GAATTCCTGC AGCCCGGGGG ATCCACTAGT 6030

TCTAGAGCGG CCGCCACCGC GGTGGAGCTC CAGCTTTTGT TCCCTTTAGT GAGGGTTAAG 6090

TTCGAGCTTG TCGTGG 6106

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 2:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 243 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid (D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 2:

Met Lys Arg Met Glu Gly Lys Leu Phe Met Val Ser Lys Lys Leu Gin 1 5 10 15

Val Val Thr Lys Thr Val Leu Leu Ser Thr Val Phe Ser He Ser Leu 20 25 30

Leu Asn Asn Glu Val He Lys Ala Glu Gin Leu Asn He Asn Ser Gin 35 40 45

Ser Lys Tyr Thr Asn Leu Gin Asn Leu Lys He Thr Asp Lys Val Glu 50 55 60

Asp Phe Lys Glu Asp Lys Glu Lys Ala Lys Glu Trp Gly Lys Glu Lys 65 70 75 80

Glu Lys Glu Trp Lys Leu Thr Ala Thr Glu Lys Gly Lys Met Asn Asn 85 90 95

Phe Leu Asp Asn Lys Asn Asp He Xaa Thr Asn Tyr Lys Glu He Thr 100 105 HO

Phe Ser Met Ala Gly Ser Phe Glu Asp Glu He Lys Asp Leu Lys Glu 115 120 125

He Asp Lys Met Phe Asp Lys Thr Asn Leu Ser Asn Ser He He Thr 130 135 140

Tyr Lys Asn Val Glu Pro Thr Thr He Gly Phe Asn Lys Ser Leu Thr 145 150 155 160

Glu Gly Asn Thr He Asn Ser Asp Ala Met Ala Gin Phe Lys Glu Gin 165 170 175

Phe Leu Asp Arg Asp He Lys Phe Asp Ser Tyr Leu Asp Thr His Leu 180 185 190

Thr Ala Gin Gin Val Ser Ser Lys Glu Arg Val He Leu Lys Val Thr 195 200 205

Val Pro Ser Gly Lys Gly Ser Thr Thr Pro Thr Lys Ala Gly Val He 210 215 220

Leu Asn Asn Ser Glu Tyr Lys Met Leu He Asp Asn Gly Tyr Met Val 225 230 235 240

His Val Asp

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 3:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 182 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid (D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 3:

Met Lys Asn Tyr Glu Glu Trp Ala Lys Asp Leu Thr Asp Ser Gin Arg 1 5 10 15

Glu Ala Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ala Arg Gin Asp Tyr Lys Glu He Asn Asn 20 25 30

Tyr Leu Arg Asn Gin Gly Gly Ser Gly Asn Glu Lys Leu Asp Ala Gin 35 40 45

He Lys Asn He Ser Asp Ala Leu Gly Lys Lys Pro He Pro Glu Asn 50 55 60

He Thr Val Tyr Arg Trp Cys Gly Met Pro Glu Phe Gly Tyr Gin He 65 70 75 80

Ser Asp Pro Leu Pro Ser Leu Lys Asp Phe Glu Glu Gin Phe Leu Asn 85 90 95

Thr He Lys Glu Asp Lys Gly Tyr Met Ser Thr Ser Leu Ser Ser Glu 100 105 110

Arg Leu Ala Ala Phe Gly Ser Arg Lys He He Leu Arg Leu Gin Val 115 120 125

Pro Lys Gly Ser Thr Gly Ala Tyr Leu Ser Ala He Gly Gly Phe Ala 130 135 140

Ser Glu Lys Glu He Leu Leu Asp Lys Asp Ser Lys Tyr His He Asp 145 150 155 160

Lys Val Thr Glu Val He He Lys Gly Val Lys Arg Tyr Val Val Asp 165 170 175

Ala Thr Leu Leu Thr Asn 180

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 4:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 2655 base pairs

(B) TYPE: nucleic acid

(C) STPΛNDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic) (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO (iii) ANTI-SENSE: NO

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus cereus

(B) STRAIN: AB78

(C) INDIVIDUAL ISOLATE: NRRL B-21058

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: CDS

(B) LOCATION: 1..2652

(C) IDENTIFICATION METHOD: experimental

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /product= "100 kDa protein VIP-1"

/evidence= EXPERIMENTAL

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 4:

ATG AAA AAT ATG AAG AAA AAG TTA GCA AGT GTT GTA ACG TGT ACG TTA 48 Met Lys Asn Met Lys Lys Lys Leu Ala Ser Val Val Thr Cys Thr Leu 1 5 10 15

TTA GCT CCT ATG TTT TTG AAT GGA AAT GTG AAT GCT GTT TAC GCA GAC 96 Leu Ala Pro Met Phe Leu Asn Gly Asn Val Asn Ala Val Tyr Ala Asp 20 25 30

AGC AAA ACA AAT CAA ATT TCT ACA ACA CAG AAA AAT CAA CAG AAA GAG 144 Ser Lys Thr Asn Gin He Ser Thr Thr Gin Lys Asn Gin Gin Lys Glu 35 40 45

ATG GAC CGA AAA GGA TTA CTT GGG TAT TAT TTC AAA GGA AAA GAT TTT 192 Met Asp Arg Lys Gly Leu Leu Gly Tyr Tyr Phe Lys Gly Lys Asp Phe 50 55 60

AGT AAT CTT ACT ATG TTT GCA CCG ACA CGT GAT AGT ACT CTT ATT TAT 240 Ser Asn Leu Thr Met Phe Ala Pro Thr Arg Asp Ser Thr Leu He Tyr 65 70 75 80

GAT CAA CAA ACA GCA AAT AAA CTA TTA GAT AAA AAA CAA CAA GAA TAT 288 Asp Gin Gin Thr Ala Asn Lys Leu Leu Asp Lys Lys Gin Gin Glu Tyr

85 90 95

CAG TCT ATT CGT TGG ATT GGT TTG ATT CAG AGT AAA GAA ACG GGA GAT 336 Gin Ser He Arg Trp He Gly Leu He Gin Ser Lys Glu Thr Gly Asp 100 105 110

TTC ACA TTT AAC TTA TCT GAG GAT GAA CAG GCA ATT ATA GAA ATC AAT 384 Phe Thr Phe Asn Leu Ser Glu Asp Glu Gin Ala He He Glu He Asn 115 120 125

GGG AAA ATT ATT TCT AAT AAA GGG AAA GAA AAG CAA GTT GTC CAT TTA 432 Gly Lys He He Ser Asn Lys Gly Lys Glu Lys Gin Val Val His Leu 130 135 140

GAA AAA GGA AAA TTA GTT CCA ATC AAA ATA GAG TAT CAA TCA GAT ACA 480 Glu Lys Gly Lys Leu Val Pro He Lys He Glu Tyr Gin Ser Asp Thr 145 150 155 160

AAA TTT AAT ATT GAC AGT AAA ACA TTT AAA GAA CTT AAA TTA TTT AAA 528 Lys Phe Asn He Asp Ser Lys Thr Phe Lys Glu Leu Lys Leu Phe Lys 165 170 175

ATA GAT AGT CAA AAC CAA CCC CAG CAA GTC CAG CAA GAT GAA CTG AGA 576 He Asp Ser Gin Asn Gin Pro Gin Gin Val Gin Gin Asp Glu Leu Arg 180 185 190

AAT CCT GAA TTT AAC AAG AAA GAA TCA CAG GAA TTC TTA GCG AAA CCA 624 Asn Pro Glu Phe Asn Lys Lys Glu Ser Gin Glu Phe Leu Ala Lys Pro 195 200 205

TCG AAA ATA AAT CTT TTC ACT CAA MAA ATG AAA AGG GAA ATT GAT GAA 672 Ser Lys He Asn Leu Phe Thr Gin Xaa Met Lys Arg Glu He Asp Glu 210 215 220

GAC ACG GAT ACG GAT GGG GAC TCT ATT CCT GAC CTT TGG GAA GAA AAT 720 Asp Thr Asp Thr Asp Gly Asp Ser He Pro Asp Leu Trp Glu Glu Asn 225 230 235 240

GGG TAT ACG ATT CAM AAT AGA ATC GCT GTA AAG TGG GAC GAT TCT CTA 768 Gly Tyr Thr He Xaa Asn Arg He Ala Val Lys Trp Asp Asp Ser Leu 245 250 255

GCA AGT AAA GGG TAT ACG AAA TTT GTT TCA AAT CCA CTA GAA AGT CAC 816 Ala Ser Lys Gly Tyr Thr Lys Phe Val Ser Asn Pro Leu Glu Ser His 260 265 270

ACA GTT GGT GAT CCT TAT ACA GAT TAT GAA AAG GCA GCA AGA GAT CTA 864 Thr Val Gly Asp Pro Tyr Thr Asp Tyr Glu Lys Ala Ala Arg Asp Leu 275 280 285

GAT TTG TCA AAT GCA AAG GAA ACG TTT AAC CCA TTG GTA GCT GCT TTT 912 Asp Leu Ser Asn Ala Lys Glu Thr Phe Asn Pro Leu Val Ala Ala Phe 290 295 300

CCA AGT GTG AAT GTT AGT ATG GAA AAG GTG ATA TTA TCA CCA AAT GAA 960 Pro Ser Val Asn Val Ser Met Glu Lys Val He Leu Ser Pro Asn Glu 305 310 315 320

AAT TTA TCC AAT AGT GTA GAG TCT CAT TCA TCC ACG AAT TGG TCT TAT 1008 Asn Leu Ser Asn Ser Val Glu Ser His Ser Ser Thr Asn Trp Ser Tyr

325 330 335

ACA AAT ACA GAA GGT GCT TCT GTT GAA GCG GGG ATT GGA CCA AAA GGT 1056 Thr Asn Thr Glu Gly Ala Ser Val Glu Ala Gly He Gly Pro Lys Gly 340 345 350

ATT TCG TTC GGA GTT AGC GTA AAC TAT CAA CAC TCT GAA ACA GTT GCA 1104 He Ser Phe Gly Val Ser Val Asn Tyr Gin His Ser Glu Thr Val Ala 355 360 365

CAA GAA TGG GGA ACA TCT ACA GGA AAT ACT TCG CAA TTC AAT ACG GCT 1152 Gin Glu Trp Gly Thr Ser Thr Gly Asn Thr Ser Gin Phe Asn Thr Ala 370 375 380

TCA GCG GGA TAT TTA AAT GCA AAT GTT CGA TAT AAC AAT GTA GGA ACT 1200 Ser Ala Gly Tyr Leu Asn Ala Asn Val Arg Tyr Asn Asn Val Gly Thr 385 390 395 400

GGT GCC ATC TAC GAT GTA AAA CCT ACA ACA AGT TTT GTA TTA AAT AAC 1248 Gly Ala He Tyr Asp Val Lys Pro Thr Thr Ser Phe Val Leu Asn Asn 405 410 415

GAT ACT ATC GCA ACT ATT ACG GCG AAA TCT AAT TCT ACA GCC TTA AAT 1296 Asp Thr He Ala Thr He Thr Ala Lys Ser Asn Ser Thr Ala Leu Asn 420 425 430

ATA TCT CCT GGA GAA AGT TAC CCG AAA AAA GGA CAA AAT GGA ATC GCA 1344 He Ser Pro Gly Glu Ser Tyr Pro Lys Lys Gly Gin Asn Gly He Ala 435 440 445

ATA ACA TCA ATG GAT GAT TTT AAT TCC CAT CCG ATT ACA TTA AAT AAA 1392 He Thr Ser Met Asp Asp Phe Asn Ser His Pro He Thr Leu Asn Lys 450 455 460

AAA CAA GTA GAT AAT CTG CTA AAT AAT AAA CCT ATG ATG TTG GAA ACA 1440 Lys Gin Val Asp Asn Leu Leu Asn Asn Lys Pro Met Met Leu Glu Thr 465 470 475 480

AAC CAA ACA GAT GGT GTT TAT AAG ATA AAA GAT ACA CAT GGA AAT ATA 1488 Asn Gin Thr Asp Gly Val Tyr Lys He Lys Asp Thr His Gly Asn He 485 490 495

GTA ACT GGC GGA GAA TGG AAT GGT GTC ATA CAA CAA ATC AAG GCT AAA 1536 Val Thr Gly Gly Glu Trp Asn Gly Val He Gin Gin He Lys Ala Lys 500 505 510

ACA GCG TCT ATT ATT GTG GAT GAT GGG GAA CGT GTA GCA GAA AAA CGT 1584 Thr Ala Ser He He Val Asp Asp Gly Glu Arg Val Ala Glu Lys Arg 515 520 525

GTA GCG GCA AAA GAT TAT GAA AAT CCA GAA GAT AAA ACA CCG TCT TTA 1632 Val Ala Ala Lys Asp Tyr Glu Asn Pro Glu Asp Lys Thr Pro Ser Leu 530 535 540

ACT TTA AAA GAT GCC CTG AAG CTT TCA TAT CCA GAT GAA ATA AAA GAA 1680 Thr Leu Lys Asp Ala Leu Lys Leu Ser Tyr Pro Asp Glu He Lys Glu 545 550 555 560

ATA GAG GGA TTA TTA TAT TAT AAA AAC AAA CCG ATA TAC GAA TCG AGC 1728 He Glu Gly Leu Leu Tyr Tyr Lys Asn Lys Pro He Tyr Glu Ser Ser

565 570 575

GTT ATG ACT TAC TTA GAT GAA AAT ACA GCA AAA GAA GTG ACC AAA CAA 1776 Val Met Thr Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn Thr Ala Lys Glu Val Thr Lys Gin 580 585 590

TTA AAT GAT ACC ACT GGG AAA TTT AAA GAT GTA AGT CAT TTA TAT GAT 1824 Leu Asn Asp Thr Thr Gly Lys Phe Lys Asp Val Ser His Leu Tyr Asp 595 600 605

GTA AAA CTG ACT CCA AAA ATG AAT GTT ACA ATC AAA TTG TCT ATA CTT 1872 Val Lys Leu Thr Pro Lys Met Asn Val Thr He Lys Leu Ser He Leu 610 615 620

TAT GAT AAT GCT GAG TCT AAT GAT AAC TCA ATT GGT AAA TGG ACA AAC 1920 Tyr Asp Asn Ala Glu Ser Asn Asp Asn Ser He Gly Lys Trp Thr Asn 625 630 635 640

ACA AAT ATT GTT TCA GGT GGA AAT AAC GGA AAA AAA CAA TAT TCT TCT 1968 Thr Asn He Val Ser Gly Gly Asn Asn Gly Lys Lys Gin Tyr Ser Ser 645 650 655

AAT AAT CCG GAT GCT AAT TTG ACA TTA AAT ACA GAT GCT CAA GAA AAA 2016 Asn Asn Pro Asp Ala Asn Leu Thr Leu Asn Thr Asp Ala Gin Glu Lys 660 665 670

TTA AAT AAA AAT CGT GAC TAT TAT ATA AGT TTA TAT ATG AAG TCA GAA 2064 Leu Asn Lys Asn Arg Asp Tyr Tyr He Ser Leu Tyr Met Lys Ser Glu 675 680 685

AAA AAC ACA CAA TGT GAG ATT ACT ATA GAT GGG GAG ATT TAT CCG ATC 2112 Lys Asn Thr Gin Cys Glu He Thr He Asp Gly Glu He Tyr Pro He 690 695 700

ACT ACA AAA ACA GTG AAT GTG AAT AAA GAC AAT TAC AAA AGA TTA GAT 2160 Thr Thr Lys Thr Val Asn Val Asn Lys Asp Asn Tyr Lys Arg Leu Asp 705 710 715 720

ATT ATA GCT CAT AAT ATA AAA AGT AAT CCA ATT TCT TCA CTT CAT ATT 2208 He He Ala His Asn He Lys Ser Asn Pro He Ser Ser Leu His He 725 730 735

AAA ACG AAT GAT GAA ATA ACT TTA TTT TGG GAT GAT ATT TCT ATA ACA 2256 Lys Thr Asn Asp Glu He Thr Leu Phe Trp Asp Asp He Ser He Thr 740 745 750

GAT GTA GCA TCA ATA AAA CCG GAA AAT TTA ACA GAT TCA GAA ATT AAA 2304 Asp Val Ala Ser He Lys Pro Glu Asn Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu He Lys 755 760 765

CAG ATT TAT AGT AGG TAT GGT ATT AAG TTA GAA GAT GGA ATC CTT ATT 2352 Gin He Tyr Ser Arg Tyr Gly He Lys Leu Glu Asp Gly He Leu He 770 775 780

GAT AAA AAA GGT GGG ATT CAT TAT GGT GAA TTT ATT AAT GAA GCT AGT 2400 Asp Lys Lys Gly Gly He His Tyr Gly Glu Phe He Asn Glu Ala Ser 785 790 795 800

TTT AAT ATT GAA CCA TTG CCA AAT TAT GTG ACC AAA TAT GAA GTT ACT 2448 Phe Asn He Glu Pro Leu Pro Asn Tyr Val Thr Lys Tyr Glu Val Thr

805 810 815

TAT AGT AGT GAG TTA GGA CCA AAC GTG AGT GAC ACA CTT GAA AGT GAT 2496 Tyr Ser Ser Glu Leu Gly Pro Asn Val Ser Asp Thr Leu Glu Ser Asp 820 825 830

AAA ATT TAC AAG GAT GGG ACA ATT AAA TTT GAT TTT ACC AAA TAT AGT 2544 Lys He Tyr Lys Asp Gly Thr He Lys Phe Asp Phe Thr Lys Tyr Ser 835 840 845

AAA AAT GAA CAA GGA TTA TTT TAT GAC AGT GGA TTA AAT TGG GAC TTT 2592 Lys Asn Glu Gin Gly Leu Phe Tyr Asp Ser Gly Leu Asn Trp Asp Phe 850 855 860

AAA ATT AAT GCT ATT ACT TAT GAT GGT AAA GAG ATG AAT GTT TTT CAT 2640 Lys He Asn Ala He Thr Tyr Asp Gly Lys Glu Met Asn Val Phe His 865 870 875 880

AGA TAT AAT AAA TAG 2655 Arg Tyr Asn Lys

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 5:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 884 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid (D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 5:

Met Lys Asn Met Lys Lys Lys Leu Ala Ser Val Val Thr Cys Thr Leu 1 5 10 15

Leu Ala Pro Met Phe Leu Asn Gly Asn Val Asn Ala Val Tyr Ala Asp 20 25 30

Ser Lys Thr Asn Gin He Ser Thr Thr Gin Lys Asn Gin Gin Lys Glu 35 40 45

Met Asp Arg Lys Gly Leu Leu Gly Tyr Tyr Phe Lys Gly Lys Asp Phe 50 55 60

Ser Asn Leu Thr Met Phe Ala Pro Thr Arg Asp Ser Thr Leu He Tyr 65 70 75 80

Asp Gin Gin Thr Ala Asn Lys Leu Leu Asp Lys Lys Gin Gin Glu Tyr 85 90 95

Gin Ser He Arg Trp He Gly Leu He Gin Ser Lys Glu Thr Gly Asp 100 105 110

Phe Thr Phe Asn Leu Ser Glu Asp Glu Gin Ala He He Glu He Asn 115 120 125

Gly Lys He He Ser Asn Lys Gly Lys Glu Lys Gin Val Val His Leu 130 135 • 140

Glu Lys Gly Lys Leu Val Pro He Lys He Glu Tyr Gin Ser Asp Thr 145 150 155 160

Lys Phe Asn He Asp Ser Lys Thr Phe Lys Glu Leu Lys Leu Phe Lys 165 170 175

He Asp Ser Gin Asn Gin Pro Gin Gin Val Gin Gin Asp Glu Leu Arg 180 185 190

Asn Pro Glu Phe Asn Lys Lys Glu Ser Gin Glu Phe Leu Ala Lys Pro 195 200 205

Ser Lys He Asn Leu Phe Thr Gin Xaa Met Lys Arg Glu He Asp Glu 210 215 220

Asp Thr Asp Thr Asp Gly Asp Ser He Pro Asp Leu Trp Glu Glu Asn 225 230 235 240

Gly Tyr Thr He Xaa Asn Arg He Ala Val Lys Trp Asp Asp Ser Leu 245 250 255

Ala Ser Lys Gly Tyr Thr Lys Phe Val Ser Asn Pro Leu Glu Ser His 260 265 270

Thr Val Gly Asp Pro Tyr Thr Asp Tyr Glu Lys Ala Ala Arg Asp Leu 275 280 285

Asp Leu Ser Asn Ala Lys Glu Thr Phe Asn Pro Leu Val Ala Ala Phe 290 295 300

Pro Ser Val Asn Val Ser Met Glu Lys Val He Leu Ser Pro Asn Glu 305 310 315 320

Asn Leu Ser Asn Ser Val Glu Ser His Ser Ser Thr Asn Trp Ser Tyr 325 330 335

Thr Asn Thr Glu Gly Ala Ser Val Glu Ala Gly He Gly Pro Lys Gly 340 345 350

He Ser Phe Gly Val Ser Val Asn Tyr Gin His Ser Glu Thr Val Ala 355 360 365

Gin Glu Trp Gly Thr Ser Thr Gly Asn Thr Ser Gin Phe Asn Thr Ala 370 375 380

Ser Ala Gly Tyr Leu Asn Ala Asn Val Arg Tyr Asn Asn Val Gly Thr 385 390 395 400

Gly Ala He Tyr Asp Val Lys Pro Thr Thr Ser Phe Val Leu Asn Asn 405 410 415

Asp Thr He Ala Thr He Thr Ala Lys Ser Asn Ser Thr Ala Leu Asn 420 425 430

He Ser Pro Gly Glu Ser Tyr Pro Lys Lys Gly Gin Asn Gly He Ala 435 440 445

He Thr Ser Met Asp Asp Phe Asn Ser His Pro He Thr Leu Asn Lys 450 455 460

Lys Gin Val Asp Asn Leu Leu Asn Asn Lys Pro Met Met Leu Glu Thr 465 470 475 480

Asn Gin Thr Asp Gly Val Tyr Lys He Lys Asp Thr His Gly Asn He 485 490 495

Val Thr Gly Gly Glu Trp Asn Gly Val He Gin Gin He Lys Ala Lys 500 505 510

Thr Ala Ser He He Val Asp Asp Gly Glu Arg Val Ala Glu Lys Arg 515 520 525

Val Ala Ala Lys Asp Tyr Glu Asn Pro Glu Asp Lys Thr Pro Ser Leu 530 535 540

Thr Leu Lys Asp Ala Leu Lys Leu Ser Tyr Pro Asp Glu He Lys Glu 545 550 555 560

He Glu Gly Leu Leu Tyr Tyr Lys Asn Lys Pro He Tyr Glu Ser Ser 565 570 575

Val Met Thr Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn Thr Ala Lys Glu Val Thr Lys Gin 580 585 590

Leu Asn Asp Thr Thr Gly Lys Phe Lys Asp Val Ser His Leu Tyr Asp 595 600 605

Val Lys Leu Thr Pro Lys Met Asn Val Thr He Lys Leu Ser He Leu 610 615 620

Tyr Asp Asn Ala Glu Ser Asn Asp Asn Ser He Gly Lys Trp Thr Asn 625 630 635 640

Thr Asn He Val Ser Gly Gly Asn Asn Gly Lys Lys Gin Tyr Ser Ser 645 650 655

Asn Asn Pro Asp Ala Asn Leu Thr Leu Asn Thr Asp Ala Gin Glu Lys 660 665 670

Leu Asn Lys Asn Arg Asp Tyr Tyr He Ser Leu Tyr Met Lys Ser Glu 675 680 685

Lys Asn Thr Gin Cys Glu He Thr He Asp Gly Glu He Tyr Pro He 690 695 700

Thr Thr Lys Thr Val Asn Val Asn Lys Asp Asn Tyr Lys Arg Leu Asp 705 710 715 720

He He Ala His Asn He Lys Ser Asn Pro He Ser Ser Leu His He 725 730 735

Lys Thr Asn Asp Glu He Thr Leu Phe Trp Asp Asp He Ser He Thr 740 745 750

Asp Val Ala Ser He Lys Pro Glu Asn Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu He Lys 755 760 765

Gin He Tyr Ser Arg Tyr Gly He Lys Leu Glu Asp Gly He Leu He 770 775 780

Asp Lys Lys Gly Gly He His Tyr Gly Glu Phe He Asn Glu Ala Ser 785 790 795 800

Phe Asn He Glu Pro Leu Pro Asn Tyr Val Thr Lys Tyr Glu Val Thr 805 810 815

Tyr Ser Ser Glu Leu Gly Pro Asn Val Ser Asp Thr Leu Glu Ser Asp 820 825 830

Lys He Tyr Lys Asp Gly Thr He Lys Phe Asp Phe Thr Lys Tyr Ser 835 840 845

Lys Asn Glu Gin Gly Leu Phe Tyr Asp Ser Gly Leu Asn Trp Asp Phe 850 855 860

Lys He Asn Ala He Thr Tyr Asp Gly Lys Glu Met Asn Val Phe His 865 870 875 880

Arg Tyr Asn Lys

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 6:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 2004 base pairs

(B) TYPE: nucleic acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic) (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO (iii) ANTI-SENSE: NO

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus cereus

(B) STRAIN: AB78

(C) INDIVIDUAL ISOLATE: NRRL B-21058

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: CDS

(B) LOCATION: 1..2001

(C) IDENTIFICATION METHOD: experimental

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /product= "80 kDa protein VIP-1"

/evidence= EXPERIMENTAL

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 6:

ATG AAA AGG GAA ATT GAT GAA GAC ACG GAT ACG GAT GGG GAC TCT ATT 48 Met Lys Arg Glu He Asp Glu Asp Thr Asp Thr Asp Gly Asp Ser He 1 5 10 15

CCT GAC CTT TGG GAA GAA AAT GGG TAT ACG ATT CAM AAT AGA ATC GCT 96 Pro Asp Leu Trp Glu Glu Asn Gly Tyr Thr He Xaa Asn Arg He Ala 20 25 30

GTA AAG TGG GAC GAT TCT CTA GCA AGT AAA GGG TAT ACG AAA TTT GTT 144

Val Lys Trp Asp Asp Ser Leu Ala Ser Lys Gly Tyr Thr Lys Phe Val 35 40 45

TCA AAT CCA CTA GAA AGT CAC ACA GTT GGT GAT CCT TAT ACA GAT TAT 192 Ser Asn Pro Leu Glu Ser His Thr Val Gly Asp Pro Tyr Thr Asp Tyr 50 55 60

GAA AAG GCA GCA AGA GAT CTA GAT TTG TCA AAT GCA AAG GAA ACG TTT 240 Glu Lys Ala Ala Arg Asp Leu Asp Leu Ser Asn Ala Lys Glu Thr Phe 65 70 75 80

AAC CCA TTG GTA GCT GCT TTT CCA AGT GTG AAT GTT AGT ATG GAA AAG 288 Asn Pro Leu Val Ala Ala Phe Pro Ser Val Asn Val Ser Met Glu Lys 85 90 95

GTG ATA TTA TCA CCA AAT GAA AAT TTA TCC AAT AGT GTA GAG TCT CAT 336 Val He Leu Ser Pro Asn Glu Asn Leu Ser Asn Ser Val Glu Ser His 100 105 110

TCA TCC ACG AAT TGG TCT TAT ACA AAT ACA GAA GGT GCT TCT GTT GAA 384 Ser Ser Thr Asn Trp Ser Tyr Thr Asn Thr Glu Gly Ala Ser Val Glu 115 120 125

GCG GGG ATT GGA CCA AAA GGT ATT TCG TTC GGA GTT AGC GTA AAC TAT 432 Ala Gly He Gly Pro Lys Gly He Ser Phe Gly Val Ser Val Asn Tyr 130 135 140

CAA CAC TCT GAA ACA GTT GCA CAA GAA TGG GGA ACA TCT ACA GGA AAT 480 Gin His Ser Glu Thr Val Ala Gin Glu Trp Gly Thr Ser Thr Gly Asn 145 150 155 160

ACT TCG CAA TTC AAT ACG GCT TCA GCG GGA TAT TTA AAT GCA AAT GTT 528 Thr Ser Gin Phe Asn Thr Ala Ser Ala Gly Tyr Leu Asn Ala Asn Val 165 170 175

CGA TAT AAC AAT GTA GGA ACT GGT GCC ATC TAC GAT GTA AAA CCT ACA 576 Arg Tyr Asn Asn Val Gly Thr Gly Ala He Tyr Asp Val Lys Pro Thr 180 185 190

ACA AGT TTT GTA TTA AAT AAC GAT ACT ATC GCA ACT ATT ACG GCG AAA 624 Thr Ser Phe Val Leu Asn Asn Asp Thr He Ala Thr He Thr Ala Lys 195 200 205

TCT AAT TCT ACA GCC TTA AAT ATA TCT CCT GGA GAA AGT TAC CCG AAA 672 Ser Asn Ser Thr Ala Leu Asn He Ser Pro Gly Glu Ser Tyr Pro Lys 210 215 220

AAA GGA CAA AAT GGA ATC GCA ATA ACA TCA ATG GAT GAT TTT AAT TCC 720 Lys Gly Gin Asn Gly He Ala He Thr Ser Met Asp Asp Phe Asn Ser 225 230 235 240

CAT CCG ATT ACA TTA AAT AAA AAA CAA GTA GAT AAT CTG CTA AAT AAT 768 His Pro He Thr Leu Asn Lys Lys Gin Val Asp Asn Leu Leu Asn Asn 245 250 255

AAA CCT ATG ATG TTG GAA ACA AAC CAA ACA GAT GGT GTT TAT AAG ATA 816 Lys Pro Met Met Leu Glu Thr Asn Gin Thr Asp Gly Val Tyr Lys He 260 265 270

AAA GAT ACA CAT GGA AAT ATA GTA ACT GGC GGA GAA TGG AAT GGT GTC 864

Lys Asp Thr His Gly Asn He Val Thr Gly Gly Glu Trp Asn Gly Val 275 280 285

ATA CAA CAA ATC AAG GCT AAA ACA GCG TCT ATT ATT GTG GAT GAT GGG 912 He Gin Gin He Lys Ala Lys Thr Ala Ser He He Val Asp Asp Gly 290 295 300

GAA CGT GTA GCA GAA AAA CGT GTA GCG GCA AAA GAT TAT GAA AAT CCA 960 Glu Arg Val Ala Glu Lys Arg Val Ala Ala Lys Asp Tyr Glu Asn Pro 305 310 315 320

GAA GAT AAA ACA CCG TCT TTA ACT TTA AAA GAT GCC CTG AAG CTT TCA 1008 Glu Asp Lys Thr Pro Ser Leu Thr Leu Lys Asp Ala Leu Lys Leu Ser 325 330 335

TAT CCA GAT GAA ATA AAA GAA ATA GAG GGA TTA TTA TAT TAT AAA AAC 1056 Tyr Pro Asp Glu He Lys Glu He Glu Gly Leu Leu Tyr Tyr Lys Asn 340 345 350

AAA CCG ATA TAC GAA TCG AGC GTT ATG ACT TAC TTA GAT GAA AAT ACA 1104 Lys Pro He Tyr Glu Ser Ser Val Met Thr Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn Thr 355 360 365

GCA AAA GAA GTG ACC AAA CAA TTA AAT GAT ACC ACT GGG AAA TTT AAA 1152 Ala Lys Glu Val Thr Lys Gin Leu Asn Asp Thr Thr Gly Lys Phe Lys 370 375 380

GAT GTA AGT CAT TTA TAT GAT GTA AAA CTG ACT CCA AAA ATG AAT GTT 1200 Asp Val Ser His Leu Tyr Asp Val Lys Leu Thr Pro Lys Met Asn Val 385 390 395 400

ACA ATC AAA TTG TCT ATA CTT TAT GAT AAT GCT GAG TCT AAT GAT AAC 1248 Thr He Lys Leu Ser He Leu Tyr Asp Asn Ala Glu Ser Asn Asp Asn 405 410 415

TCA ATT GGT AAA TGG ACA AAC ACA AAT ATT GTT TCA GGT GGA AAT AAC 1296 Ser He Gly Lys Trp Thr Asn Thr Asn He Val Ser Gly Gly Asn Asn 420 425 430

GGA AAA AAA CAA TAT TCT TCT AAT AAT CCG GAT GCT AAT TTG ACA TTA 1344 Gly Lys Lys Gin Tyr Ser Ser Asn Asn Pro Asp Ala Asn Leu Thr Leu 435 440 445

AAT ACA GAT GCT CAA GAA AAA TTA AAT AAA AAT CGT GAC TAT TAT ATA 1392 Asn Thr Asp Ala Gin Glu Lys Leu Asn Lys Asn Arg Asp Tyr Tyr He 450 455 460

AGT TTA TAT ATG AAG TCA GAA AAA AAC ACA CAA TGT GAG ATT ACT ATA 1440 Ser Leu Tyr Met Lys Ser Glu Lys Asn Thr Gin Cys Glu He Thr He 465 470 475 480

GAT GGG GAG ATT TAT CCG ATC ACT ACA AAA ACA GTG AAT GTG AAT AAA 1488 Asp Gly Glu He Tyr Pro He Thr Thr Lys Thr Val Asn Val Asn Lys 485 490 495

GAC AAT TAC AAA AGA TTA GAT ATT ATA GCT CAT AAT ATA AAA AGT AAT 1536 Asp Asn Tyr Lys Arg Leu Asp He He Ala His Asn He Lys Ser Asn 500 505 510

CCA ATT TCT TCA CTT CAT ATT AAA ACG AAT GAT GAA ATA ACT TTA TTT 1584

Pro He Ser Ser Leu His He Lys Thr Asn Asp Glu He Thr Leu Phe 515 520 525

TGG GAT GAT ATT TCT ATA ACA GAT GTA GCA TCA ATA AAA CCG GAA AAT 1632 Trp Asp Asp He Ser He Thr Asp Val Ala Ser He Lys Pro Glu Asn 530 535 540

TTA ACA GAT TCA GAA ATT AAA CAG ATT TAT AGT AGG TAT GGT ATT AAG 1680 Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu He Lys Gin He Tyr Ser Arg Tyr Gly He Lys 545 550 555 560

TTA GAA GAT GGA ATC CTT ATT GAT AAA AAA GGT GGG ATT CAT TAT GGT 1728 Leu Glu Asp Gly He Leu He Asp Lys Lys Gly Gly He His Tyr Gly 565 570 575

GAA TTT ATT AAT GAA GCT AGT TTT AAT ATT GAA CCA TTG CCA AAT TAT 1776 Glu Phe He Asn Glu Ala Ser Phe Asn He Glu Pro Leu Pro Asn Tyr 580 585 590

GTG ACC AAA TAT GAA GTT ACT TAT AGT AGT GAG TTA GGA CCA AAC GTG 1824 Val Thr Lys Tyr Glu Val Thr Tyr Ser Ser Glu Leu Gly Pro Asn Val 595 600 605

AGT GAC ACA CTT GAA AGT GAT AAA ATT TAC AAG GAT GGG ACA ATT AAA 1872 Ser Asp Thr Leu Glu Ser Asp Lys He Tyr Lys Asp Gly Thr He Lys 610 615 620

TTT GAT TTT ACC AAA TAT AGT AAA AAT GAA CAA GGA TTA TTT TAT GAC 1920 Phe Asp Phe Thr Lys Tyr Ser Lys Asn Glu Gin Gly Leu Phe Tyr Asp 625 630 635 640

AGT GGA TTA AAT TGG GAC TTT AAA ATT AAT GCT ATT ACT TAT GAT GGT 1968 Ser Gly Leu Asn Trp Asp Phe Lys He Asn Ala He Thr Tyr Asp Gly 645 650 655

AAA GAG ATG AAT GTT TTT CAT AGA TAT AAT AAA TAG 2004

Lys Glu Met Asn Val Phe His Arg Tyr Asn Lys 660 665

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 7:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 667 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid (D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: protein

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 7:

Met Lys Arg Glu He Asp Glu Asp Thr Asp Thr Asp Gly Asp Ser He 1 5 10 15

Pro Asp Leu Trp Glu Glu Asn Gly Tyr Thr He Xaa Asn Arg He Ala 20 25 30

Val Lys Trp Asp Asp Ser Leu Ala Ser Lys Gly Tyr Thr Lys Phe Val 35 40 45

Ser Asn Pro Leu Glu Ser His Thr Val Gly Asp Pro Tyr Thr Asp Tyr 50 55 60

Glu Lys Ala Ala Arg Asp Leu Asp Leu Ser Asn Ala Lys Glu Thr Phe 65 70 75 80

Asn Pro Leu Val Ala Ala Phe Pro Ser Val Asn Val Ser Met Glu Lys 85 90 95

Val He Leu Ser Pro Asn Glu Asn Leu Ser Asn Ser Val Glu Ser His 100 105 110

Ser Ser Thr Asn Trp Ser Tyr Thr Asn Thr Glu Gly Ala Ser Val Glu 115 120 125

Ala Gly He Gly Pro Lys Gly He Ser Phe Gly Val Ser Val Asn Tyr 130 135 140

Gin His Ser Glu Thr Val Ala Gin Glu Trp Gly Thr Ser Thr Gly Asn 145 150 155 160

Thr Ser Gin Phe Asn Thr Ala Ser Ala Gly Tyr Leu Asn Ala Asn Val 165 170 175

Arg Tyr Asn Asn Val Gly Thr Gly Ala He Tyr Asp Val Lys Pro Thr 180 185 190

Thr Ser Phe Val Leu Asn Asn Asp Thr He Ala Thr He Thr Ala Lys 195 200 205

Ser Asn Ser Thr Ala Leu Asn He Ser Pro Gly Glu Ser Tyr Pro Lys 210 215 220

Lys Gly Gin Asn Gly He Ala He Thr Ser Met Asp Asp Phe Asn Ser 225 230 235 240

His Pro He Thr Leu Asn Lys Lys Gin Val Asp Asn Leu Leu Asn Asn 245 250 255

Lys Pro Met Met Leu Glu Thr Asn Gin Thr Asp Gly Val Tyr Lys He 260 265 270

Lys Asp Thr His Gly Asn He Val Thr Gly Gly Glu Trp Asn Gly Val 275 280 285

He Gin Gin He Lys Ala Lys Thr Ala Ser He He Val Asp Asp Gly 290 295 300

Glu Arg Val Ala Glu Lys Arg Val Ala Ala Lys Asp Tyr Glu Asn Pro 305 310 315 320

Glu Asp Lys Thr Pro Ser Leu Thr Leu Lys Asp Ala Leu Lys Leu Ser 325 330 335

Tyr Pro Asp Glu He Lys Glu He Glu Gly Leu Leu Tyr Tyr Lys Asn 340 345 350

Lys Pro He Tyr Glu Ser Ser Val Met Thr Tyr Leu Asp Glu Asn Thr 355 360 365

Ala Lys Glu Val Thr Lys Gin Leu Asn Asp Thr Thr Gly Lys Phe Lys 370 375 380

Asp Val Ser His Leu Tyr Asp Val Lys Leu Thr Pro Lys Met Asn Val 385 390 395 400

Thr He Lys Leu Ser He Leu Tyr Asp Asn Ala Glu Ser Asn Asp Asn 405 410 415

Ser He Gly Lys Trp Thr Asn Thr Asn He Val Ser Gly Gly Asn Asn 420 425 430

Gly Lys Lys Gin Tyr Ser Ser Asn Asn Pro Asp Ala Asn Leu Thr Leu 435 440 445

Asn Thr Asp Ala Gin Glu Lys Leu Asn Lys Asn Arg Asp Tyr Tyr He 450 455 460

Ser Leu Tyr Met Lys Ser Glu Lys Asn Thr Gin Cys Glu He Thr He 465 470 475 480

Asp Gly Glu He Tyr Pro He Thr Thr Lys Thr Val Asn Val Asn Lys 485 490 495

Asp Asn Tyr Lys Arg Leu Asp He He Ala His Asn He Lys Ser Asn 500 505 510

Pro He Ser Ser Leu His He Lys Thr Asn Asp Glu He Thr Leu Phe 515 520 525

Trp Asp Asp He Ser He Thr Asp Val Ala Ser He Lys Pro Glu Asn 530 535 540

Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu He Lys Gin He Tyr Ser Arg Tyr Gly He Lys 545 550 555 560

Leu Glu Asp Gly He Leu He Asp Lys Lys Gly Gly He His Tyr Gly 565 570 575

Glu Phe He Asn Glu Ala Ser Phe Asn He Glu Pro Leu Pro Asn Tyr 580 585 590

Val Thr Lys Tyr Glu Val Thr Tyr Ser Ser Glu Leu Gly Pro Asn Val 595 600 605

Ser Asp Thr Leu Glu Ser Asp Lys He Tyr Lys Asp Gly Thr He Lys 610 615 620

Phe Asp Phe Thr Lys Tyr Ser Lys Asn Glu Gin Gly Leu Phe Tyr Asp 625 630 635 640

Ser Gly Leu Asn Trp Asp Phe Lys He Asn Ala He Thr Tyr Asp Gly 645 650 655

Lys Glu Met Asn Val Phe His Arg Tyr Asn Lys 660 665

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 8:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH : 16 amino acids

(B) TYPE : amino acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS : single

(D) TOPOLOGY : linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus cereus

(B) STRAIN: AB78

(C) INDIVIDUAL ISOLATE : NRRL B-21058

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..16

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal sequence of protein purified from strain AB78"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 8:

Lys Arg Glu He Asp Glu Asp Thr Asp Thr Asx Gly Asp Ser He Pro 1 5 10 15

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 9:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 21 base pairs

(B) TYPE: nucleic acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic) (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO (iii) ANTI-SENSE: NO

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: misc_feature

(B) LOCATION: 1..21

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "Oligonucleotide probe based on amino acids 3 to 9 of SEQ ID NO:8, using codon usage of Bacillus thuringiensis"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 9:

GAAATTGATC AAGATACNGA T 21

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 10:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 14 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus thuringiensis

(B) STRAIN: AB88

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..14

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal amino acid sequence of protein known as anion exchange fraction 23 (smaller)"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 10:

Xaa Glu Pro Phe Val Ser Ala Xaa Xaa Xaa Gin Xaa Xaa Xaa 1 5 10

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 11:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 13 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid

(C) STRiVNDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus thuringiensis

(B) STRAIN: AB88

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..13

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal amino acid sequence of protein known as anion exchange fraction 23 (larger)"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 11:

Xaa Glu Tyr Glu Asn Val Glu Pro Phe Val Ser Ala Xaa 1 5 10

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 12:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 14 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus thurigiensis

(B) STRAIN: AB88

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..1

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal sequence of 80 kDa VIP active against Agrotis ipsilon"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 12:

Met Asn Lys Asn Asn Thr Lys Leu Pro Thr Arg Ala Leu Pro 1 5 10

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 13:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 15 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus thuringiensis

(B) STRAIN: AB88

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..15

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal amino acid sequence of 35 kDa VIP active against Agrotis ipsilon"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 13:

Ala Leu Ser Glu Asn Thr Gly Lys Asp Gly Gly Tyr He Val Pro 1 5 10 15

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 14:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 9 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide

(iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus thuringiensis

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..9

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal sequence of a 130 kDa delta-endotoxin"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 14:

Met Asp Asn Asn Pro Asn He Asn Glu 1 5

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 15:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 9 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..9

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal sequence of 80 kDa delta-endotoxin"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 15:

Met Asp Asn Asn Pro Asn He Asn Glu 1 5

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 16:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 11 amino acids

(B) TYPE: amino acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: peptide

(iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO

(v) FRAGMENT TYPE: N-terminal

(vi) ORIGINAL SOURCE:

(A) ORGANISM: Bacillus thuringiensis

(ix) FEATURE:

(A) NAME/KEY: Peptide

(B) LOCATION: 1..11

(D) OTHER INFORMATION: /note= "N-terminal sequence from 60 kDa delta-endotoxin"

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 16:

Met Asn Val Leu Asn Ser Gly Arg Thr Thr He 1 5 10

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO: 17:

(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS:

(A) LENGTH: 2655 base pairs

(B) TYPE: nucleic acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS: single

(D) TOPOLOGY: linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic) (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO (iii) ANTI-SENSE: NO

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 17:

ATGAAGAACA TGAAGAAGAA GCTGGCCAGC GTGGTGACCT GCACCCTGCT GGCCCCCATG 60

TTCCTGAACG GCAACGTGAA CGCCGTGTAC GCCGACAGCA AGACCAACCA GATCAGCACC 120

ACCCAGAAGA ACCAGCAGAA GGAGATGGAC CGCAAGGGCC TGCTGGGCTA CTACTTCAAG 180

GGCAAGGACT TCAGCAACCT GACCATGTTC GCCCCCACGC GTGACAGCAC CCTGATCTAC 240

GACCAGCAGA CCGCCAACAA GCTGCTGGAC AAGAAGCAGC AGGAGTACCA GAGCATCCGC 300

TGGATCGGCC TGATCCAGAG CAAGGAGACC GGCGACTTCA CCTTCAACCT GAGCGAGGAC 360

GAGCAGGCCA TCATCGAGAT CAACGGCAAG ATCATCAGCA ACAAGGGCAA GGAGAAGCAG 420

GTGGTGCACC TGGAGAAGGG CAAGCTGGTG CCCATCAAGA TCGAGTACCA GAGCGACACC 480

AAGTTCAACA TCGACAGCAA GACCTTCAAG GAGCTGAAGC TTTTCAAGAT CGACAGCCAG 540

AACCAGCCCC AGCAGGTGCA GCAGGACGAG CTGCGCAACC CCGAGTTCAA CAAGAAGGAG 600

AGCCAGGAGT TCCTGGCCAA GCCCAGCAAG ATCAACCTGT TCACCCAGCA GATGAAGCGC 660

GAGATCGACG AGGACACCGA CACCGACGGC GACAGCATCC CCGACCTGTG GGAGGAGAAC 720

GGCTACACCA TCCAGAACCG CATCGCCGTG AAGTGGGACG ACAGCCTGGC TAGCAAGGGC 780

TACACCAAGT TCGTGAGCAA CCCCCTGGAG AGCCACACCG TGGGCGACCC CTACACCGAC 840

TACGAGAAGG CCGCCCGCGA CCTGGACCTG AGCAACGCCA AGGAGACCTT CAACCCCCTG 900

GTGGCCGCCT TCCCCAGCGT GAACGTGAGC ATGGAGAAGG TGATCCTGAG CCCCAACGAG 960

AACCTGAGCA ACAGCGTGGA GAGCCACTCG AGCACCAACT GGAGCTACAC CAACACCGAG 1020

GGCGCCAGCG TGGAGGCCGG CATCGGTCCC AAGGGCATCA GCTTCGGCGT GAGCGTGAAC 1080

TACCAGCACA GCGAGACCGT GGCCCAGGAG TGGGGCACCA GCACCGGCAA CACCAGCCAG 1140

TTCAACACCG CCAGCGCCGG CTACCTGAAC GCCAACGTGC GCTACAACAA CGTGGGCACC 1200

GGCGCCATCT ACGACGTGAA GCCCACCACC AGCTTCGTGC TGAACAACGA CACCATCGCC 1260

ACCATCACCG CCAAGTCGAA TTCCACCGCC CTGAACATCA GCCCCGGCGA GAGCTACCCC 1320

AAGAAGGGCC AGAACGGCAT CGCCATCACC AGCATGGACG ACTTCAACAG CCACCCCATC 1380

ACCCTGAACA AGAAGCAGGT GGACAACCTG CTGAACAACA AGCCCATGAT GCTGGAGACC 1440

AACCAGACCG ACGGCGTCTA CAAGATCAAG GACACCCACG GCAACATCGT GACCGGCGGC 1500

GAGTGGAACG GCGTGATCCA GCAGATCAAG GCCAAGACCG CCAGCATCAT CGTCGACGAC 1560

GGCGAGCGCG TGGCCGAGAA GCGCGTGGCC GCCAAGGACT ACGAGAACCC CGAGGACAAG 1620

ACCCCCAGCC TGACCCTGAA GGACGCCCTG AAGCTGAGCT ACCCCGACGA GATCAAGGAG 1680

ATCGAGGGCC TGCTGTACTA CAAGAACAAG CCCATCTACG AGAGCAGCGT GATGACCTAT 1740

CTAGACGAGA ACACCGCCAA GGAGGTGACC AAGCAGCTGA ACGACACCAC CGGCAAGTTC 1800

AAGGACGTGA GCCACCTGTA CGACGTGAAG CTGACCCCCA AGATGAACGT GACCATCAAG 1860

CTGAGCATCC TGTACGACAA CGCCGAGAGC AACGACAACA GCATCGGCAA GTGGACCAAC 1920

ACCAACATCG TGAGCGGCGG CAACAACGGC AAGAAGC GT ACAGCAGCAA CAACCCCGAC 1980

GCCAACCTGA CCCTGAACAC CGACGCCCAG GAGAAGCTGA ACAAGAACCG CGACTACTAC 2040

ATCAGCCTGT ACATGAAGAG CGAGAAGAAC ACCCAGTGCG AGATCACCAT CGACGGCGAG 2100

ATATACCCCA TCACCACCAA GACCGTGAAC GTGAACAAGG ACAACTACAA GCGCCTGGAC 2160

ATCATCGCCC ACAACATCAA GAGCAACCCC ATCAGCAGCC TGCACATCAA GACCAACGAC 2220

GAGATCACCC TGTTCTGGGA CGACATATCG ATTACCGACG TCGCCAGCAT CAAGCCCGAG 2280

AACCTGACCG ACAGCGAGAT CAAGCAGATA TACAGTCGCT ACGGCATCAA GCTGGAGGAC 2340

GGCATCCTGA TCGACAAGAA GGGCGGCATC CACTACGGCG AGTTCATCAA CGAGGCCAGC 2400

TTCAACATCG AGCCCCTGCA GAACTACGTG ACCAAGTACG AGGTGACCTA CAGCAGCGAG 2460

CTGGGCCCCA ACGTGAGCGA CACCCTGGAG AGCGACAAGA TTTACAAGGA CGGCACCATC 2520

AAGTTCGACT TCACCAAGTA CAGCAAGAAC GAGCAGGGCC TGTTCTACGA CAGCGGCCTG 2580

AACTGGGACT TCAAGATCAA CGCCATCACC TACGACGGCA AGGAGATGAA CGTGTTCCAC 2640

CGCTACAACA AGTAG 2655 (2 ) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO : 18 :

( i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS :

(A) LENGTH : 2010 base pairs

(B) TYPE : nucleic acid

(C) STRANDEDNESS : single

(D) TOPOLOGY : linear

(ii) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic) (iii) HYPOTHETICAL: NO (iii) ANTI-SENSE: NO

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 18:

GGATCCATGA AGCGCGAGAT CGACGAGGAC ACCGACACCG ACGGCGACAG CATCCCCGAC 60

CTGTGGGAGG AGAACGGCTA CACCATCCAG AACCGCATCG CCGTGAAGTG GGACGACAGC 120

CTGGCTAGCA AGGGCTACAC CAAGTTCGTG AGCAACCCCC TGGAGAGCCA CACCGTGGGC 180

GACCCCTACA CCGACTACGA GAAGGCCGCC CGCGACCTGG ACCTGAGCAA CGCCAAGGAG 240

ACCTTCAACC CCCTGGTGGC CGCCTTCCCC AGCGTGAACG TGAGCATGGA GAAGGTGATC 300

CTGAGCCCCA ACGAGAACCT GAGCAACAGC GTGGAGAGCC ACTCGAGCAC CAACTGGAGC 360

TACACCAACA CCGAGGGCGC CAGCGTGGAG GCCGGCATCG GTCCCAAGGG CATCAGCTTC 420

GGCGTGAGCG TGAACTACCA GCACAGCGAG ACCGTGGCCC AGGAGTGGGG CACCAGCACC 480

GGCAACACCA GCCAGTTCAA CACCGCCAGC GCCGGCTACC TGAACGCCAA CGTGCGCTAC 540

AACAACGTGG GCACCGGCGC CATCTACGAC GTGAAGCCCA CCACCAGCTT CGTGCTGAAC 600

AACGACACCA TCGCCACCAT CACCGCCAAG TCGAATTCCA CCGCCCTGAA CATCAGCCCC 660

GGCGAGAGCT ACCCCAAGAA GGGCCAGAAC GGCATCGCCA TCACCAGCAT GGACGACTTC 720

AACAGCCACC CCATCACCCT GAACAAGAAG CAGGTGGACA ACCTGCTGAA CAACAAGCCC 780

ATGATGCTGG AGACCAACCA GACCGACGGC GTCTACAAGA TCAAGGACAC CCACGGCAAC 840

ATCGTGACCG GCGGCGAGTG GAACGGCGTG ATCCAGCAGA TCAAGGCCAA GACCGCCAGC 900

ATCATCGTCG ACGACGGCGA GCGCGTGGCC GAGAAGCGCG TGGCCGCCAA GGACTACGAG 960

AACCCCGAGG ACAAGACCCC CAGCCTGACC CTGAAGGACG CCCTGAAGCT GAGCTACCCC 1020

GACGAGATCA AGGAGATCGA GGGCCTGCTG TACTACAAGA ACAAGCCCAT CTACGAGAGC 1080

AGCGTGATGA CCTATCTAGA CGAGAACACC GCCAAGGAGG TGACCAAGCA GCTGAACGAC 1140

ACCACCGGCA AGTTCAAGGA CGTGAGCCAC CTGTACGACG TGAAGCTGAC CCCCAAGATG 1200

AACGTGACCA TCAAGCTGAG CATCCTGTAC GACAACGCCG AGAGCAACGA CAACAGCATC 1260

GGCAAGTGGA CCAACACCAA CATCGTGAGC GGCGGCAACA ACGGCAAGAA GCAGTACAGC 1320

AGCAACAACC CCGACGCCAA CCTGACCCTG AACACCGACG CCCAGGAGAA GCTGAACAAG 1380

AACCGCGACT ACTACATCAG CCTGTACATG AAGAGCGAGA AGAACACCCA GTGCGAGATC 1440

ACCATCGACG GCGAGATATA CCCCATCACC ACCAAGACCG TGAACGTGAA CAAGGACAAC 1500

TACAAGCGCC TGGACATCAT CGCCCACAAC ATCAAGAGCA ACCCCATCAG CAGCCTGCAC 1560

ATCAAGACCA ACGACGAGAT CACCCTGTTC TGGGACGACA TATCGATTAC CGACGTCGCC 1620

AGCATCAAGC CCGAGAACCT GACCGACAGC GAGATCAAGC AGATATACAG TCGCTACGGC 1680

ATCAAGCTGG AGGACGGCAT CCTGATCGAC AAGAAGGGCG GCATCCACTA CGGCGAGTTC 1740

ATCAACGAGG CCAGCTTCAA CATCGAGCCC CTGCAGAACT ACGTGACCAA GTACGAGGTG 1800

ACCTACAGCA GCGAGCTGGG CCCCAACGTG AGCGACACCC TGGAGAGCGA CAAGATTTAC 1860

AAGGACGGCA CCATCAAGTT CGACTTCACC AAGTACAGCA AGAACGAGCA GGGCCTGTTC 1920

TACGACAGCG GCCTGAACTG GGACTTCAAG ATCAACGCCA TCACCTACGA CGGCAAGGAG 1980

ATGAACGTGT TCCACCGCTA CAACAAGTAG 2010

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule 13bis)

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule ttbis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 41 , line 1—

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture

Collection (NRRL) International Depositary Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

18 March 1993 (18.03.93) NRRL B-21059

C. .ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listedbelow will be submitted to the International Bureau later (specify the general nature of ' th indications e.g., "Accession Number of Deposit")

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORG/_NISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 48 . line 1 8-70

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. university Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

18 March 1993 ( 18.03.93) NRRL B-21060

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (ifthe indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the general nature of the indications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit")

For Intemational Bureau use only

I I This sheet was received by the International Bureau on:

Authorized officer

Form PCT/RO/134 (July 1992)

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

A.

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet [

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture

Collection (NRRL) International Depositary Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

18 March 1993 (18.03.93 ) NRRL B-21061

C. .ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet [

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if tlie indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the International Bureau later (specify the genera I nature of the indications eg., "Accession Number of Deposit")

For Intemational Bureau use only

I I This sheet was received by the Intemational Bureau on:

Authorized officer

Form PCT/RO/134 Jul 1992

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule 13bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 42 , line 21-24

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet { |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21222

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet Q

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for aU designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the general nature of the indications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit")

For Intemational Bureau use only j I This sheet was received by the Intemational Bureau on:

Authorized officer

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 53 . line 18

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet | |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21224

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet Q

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the general nature of theindicationse.g., 'Accession Number of Deposit')

For Intemational Bureau use only

I I This sheet was received by the Intemational Bureau on:

Authorized officer

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule 13bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 51 , line 8-10

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet j

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21225

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the general nature of the indications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit')

For International Bureau use only

[_J This sheet was received by the Intemational Bureau on:

Authorized officer

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 52 , line 3-6

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet | j

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21226

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet Q

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (ifthe indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the general nature φhe indications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit")

For Intemational Bureau use only

I I This sheet was received by the International Bureau on:

Authorized officer

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 52 , line 3-6

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21227

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet Q

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for all designated Slates)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the genera I nature of the indications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit')

For International Bureau use only

I I This sheet was received by the Intemational Bureau on:

Authorized officer

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule 13bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 52 . line 3-6

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21228

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet Q

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the general nature of the indications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit')

For Intemational Bureau use only

I I This sheet was received by the International Bureau on:

Authorized officer

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 52 , line 3-6

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21229

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed belowwill be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify t e general nature of iheindications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit")

For Intemational Bureau use only

I I This sheet was received by the International Bureau on:

Authorized officer

INDICATIONS RELATING TO A DEPOSITED MICROORGANISM

(PCT Rule I3bis)

A. The indications made below relate to the microorganism referred to in the description on page 53 , line 1-4

B. IDENTIFICATION OF DEPOSIT Further deposits are identified on an additional sheet | |

Name of depositary institution Agricultural Research Culture Collection (NRRL)

International Depository Authority

Address of depositary institution (including postal code and country)

1815 N. University Street

Peoria, IL 61604

USA

Date of deposit Accession Number

09 March 1994 (09.03.94) NRRL B-21230

C. ADDITIONAL INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable) This information is continued on an additional sheet j"

We request the Expert Solution where available

D. DESIGNATED STATES FOR WHICH INDICATIONS ARE MADE (if the indications are not for all designated States)

E. SEPARATE FURNISHING OF INDICATIONS (leave blank if not applicable)

The indications listed below will be submitted to the Intemational Bureau later (specify the general nature φhe indications eg., 'Accession Number of Deposit")

For Intemational Bureau use only

Pj This sheet was received by the Intemational Bureau on:

Authorized officer